Medieval university

medieval universitiesuniversitiesuniversitystudiumfirst universitiesChristian universityeducationmedievalmedieval learningAcademia
A medieval university is a corporation organized during the Middle Ages for the purposes of higher education.wikipedia
267 Related Articles

Cathedral school

cathedral schoolscathedral song schoolsChoir School
These universities evolved from much older Christian cathedral schools and monastic schools, and it is difficult to define the exact date when they became true universities, though the lists of studia generalia for higher education in Europe held by the Vatican are a useful guide.
Cathedral schools began in the Early Middle Ages as centers of advanced education, some of them ultimately evolving into medieval universities.

University

universitiescollegecomprehensive university
These universities evolved from much older Christian cathedral schools and monastic schools, and it is difficult to define the exact date when they became true universities, though the lists of studia generalia for higher education in Europe held by the Vatican are a useful guide. The first Western European institutions generally considered universities were established in the Kingdom of Italy (then part of the Holy Roman Empire), the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of France, the Kingdom of Spain, and the Kingdom of Portugal between the 11th and 15th centuries for the study of the Arts and the higher disciplines of Theology, Law, and Medicine.
The modern university system has roots in the European medieval university, which was created in Italy and evolved from cathedral schools for the clergy during the High Middle Ages.

Scholasticism

scholasticScholasticsscholastic philosophy
The word universitas originally applied only to the scholastic guilds—that is, the corporation of students and masters—within the studium, and it was always modified, as universitas magistrorum, universitas scholarium, or universitas magistrorum et scholarium.
Scholasticism was a medieval school of philosophy that employed a critical method of philosophical analysis presupposed upon a Latin Christian theistic paradigm which dominated teaching in the medieval universities in Europe from about 1100 to 1700.

Liberal arts education

liberal artsliberal studiesArts
The first Western European institutions generally considered universities were established in the Kingdom of Italy (then part of the Holy Roman Empire), the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of France, the Kingdom of Spain, and the Kingdom of Portugal between the 11th and 15th centuries for the study of the Arts and the higher disciplines of Theology, Law, and Medicine.
It was in that two-fold form that the seven liberal arts were studied in the medieval Western university.

Monastic school

monastic schoolsmonasticmonastic "inner school
These universities evolved from much older Christian cathedral schools and monastic schools, and it is difficult to define the exact date when they became true universities, though the lists of studia generalia for higher education in Europe held by the Vatican are a useful guide.
In some places monastic schools evolved into medieval universities which eventually largely superseded both institutions as centers of higher learning.

University of Cambridge

Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUniversity
1167), University of Modena (1175), University of Palencia (1208), University of Cambridge (1209), University of Salamanca (1218), University of Montpellier (1220), University of Padua (1222), University of Toulouse (1229), University of Orleans (1235), University of Siena (1240), University of Valladolid (1241) University of Northampton (1261), University of Coimbra (1288), University of Pisa (1343), Charles University in Prague (1348), Jagiellonian University (1364), University of Vienna (1365), Heidelberg University (1386) and the University of St Andrews (1413) begun as private corporations of teachers and their pupils.
After Cambridge was described as a studium generale in a letter from Pope Nicholas IV in 1290, and confirmed as such in a bull by Pope John XXII in 1318, it became common for researchers from other European medieval universities to visit Cambridge to study or to give lecture courses.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
A medieval university is a corporation organized during the Middle Ages for the purposes of higher education.
Cathedral schools were in turn replaced by the universities established in major European cities.

High Middle Ages

high medievalHighhigh medieval period
In addition, some of the greatest theologians of the High Middle Ages, Thomas Aquinas and Robert Grosseteste, were products of the medieval university.
The first universities started operating in Bologna, Paris, Oxford, Salamanca, Cambridge and Modena.

Madrasa

madrasahmadrassamedrese
Some scholars such as Syed Farid Alatas have noted some parallels between Madrasahs and early European colleges and have thus inferred that the first universities in Europe were influenced by the Madrasahs in Islamic Spain and the Emirate of Sicily.
However, scholars like George Makdisi, Toby Huff and Norman Daniel argue that the European medieval university has no parallel in the medieval Islamic world.

Authentica habita

Constitutio Habit
Emperor Frederick I in Authentica Habita (1158) gave the first privileges to students in Bologna.
It is a key founding document in the history of the medieval university in Europe.

Christendom

Christian worldChristian EuropeChristian
Other scholars such as George Makdisi, Toby Huff and Norman Daniel, however, have questioned this, citing the lack of evidence for an actual transmission from the Islamic world to Christian Europe and highlighting the differences in the structure, methodologies, procedures, curricula and legal status of the "Islamic college" (madrasa) versus the European university.
Medieval Christianity created the first modern universities.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
These universities evolved from much older Christian cathedral schools and monastic schools, and it is difficult to define the exact date when they became true universities, though the lists of studia generalia for higher education in Europe held by the Vatican are a useful guide.
Christianity has had a significant impact on education, as the church created the bases of the Western system of education, and was the sponsor of founding universities in the Western world, as the university is generally regarded as an institution that has its origin in the Medieval Christian setting.

Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas AquinasAquinasSaint Thomas Aquinas
In addition, some of the greatest theologians of the High Middle Ages, Thomas Aquinas and Robert Grosseteste, were products of the medieval university.
This same year he was ordered by the Dominican Chapter of Agnani to teach at the studium conventuale at the Roman convent of Santa Sabina, founded some years before, in 1222.

Ancient higher-learning institutions

Medieval university (Asia)institutions of higher learningacademy of learning
From the early modern period onward, this Western-style organizational form gradually spread from the medieval Latin west across the globe, eventually replacing all other higher-learning institutions and becoming the preeminent model for higher education everywhere.

Charles University

Charles University in PragueUniversity of PraguePrague
1167), University of Modena (1175), University of Palencia (1208), University of Cambridge (1209), University of Salamanca (1218), University of Montpellier (1220), University of Padua (1222), University of Toulouse (1229), University of Orleans (1235), University of Siena (1240), University of Valladolid (1241) University of Northampton (1261), University of Coimbra (1288), University of Pisa (1343), Charles University in Prague (1348), Jagiellonian University (1364), University of Vienna (1365), Heidelberg University (1386) and the University of St Andrews (1413) begun as private corporations of teachers and their pupils.
The establishment of a medieval university in Prague was inspired by Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV.

University of Paris strike of 1229

strike at the University of ParisdispersedUniversity of Paris strike
This happened at the University of Paris strike of 1229 after a riot left a number of students dead.
The students protested with a "dispersion", or student strike, which lasted more than two years and led to a number of reforms of the medieval university.

Ancient universities of Scotland

ancient universitiesancient Scottish universitiesancient university
The ancient universities of Scotland are medieval and renaissance universities which continue to exist in the present day.

List of oldest universities in continuous operation

oldest universitiesoldest universities in continuous operationeducational
The origin of many medieval universities can be traced back to the Christian cathedral schools or monastic schools, which appeared as early as the 6th century and were run for hundreds of years as such before their formal establishment as universities in the high medieval period.

University of Bologna

BolognaBologna UniversityUniversità di Bologna
Among the earliest universities of this type were the University of Bologna (1088), University of Paris (teach.

Nation (university)

student nationnationsnation
Once widespread across Europe in medieval times, they are now largely restricted to the oldest universities of Sweden and Finland, in part because of the violent conflicts between the nations in university towns in other countries.

Studium generale

studiumstudia generaliaStudia Generali
These universities evolved from much older Christian cathedral schools and monastic schools, and it is difficult to define the exact date when they became true universities, though the lists of studia generalia for higher education in Europe held by the Vatican are a useful guide.
Studium generale is the old customary name for a medieval university in medieval Europe.

University of Montpellier

MontpellierMontpellier UniversityUniversité de Montpellier
1167), University of Modena (1175), University of Palencia (1208), University of Cambridge (1209), University of Salamanca (1218), University of Montpellier (1220), University of Padua (1222), University of Toulouse (1229), University of Orleans (1235), University of Siena (1240), University of Valladolid (1241) University of Northampton (1261), University of Coimbra (1288), University of Pisa (1343), Charles University in Prague (1348), Jagiellonian University (1364), University of Vienna (1365), Heidelberg University (1386) and the University of St Andrews (1413) begun as private corporations of teachers and their pupils.

University of Northampton (13th century)

University of NorthamptonNorthampton13th century University of Northampton
1167), University of Modena (1175), University of Palencia (1208), University of Cambridge (1209), University of Salamanca (1218), University of Montpellier (1220), University of Padua (1222), University of Toulouse (1229), University of Orleans (1235), University of Siena (1240), University of Valladolid (1241) University of Northampton (1261), University of Coimbra (1288), University of Pisa (1343), Charles University in Prague (1348), Jagiellonian University (1364), University of Vienna (1365), Heidelberg University (1386) and the University of St Andrews (1413) begun as private corporations of teachers and their pupils.

A History of the University in Europe

A History of the University in Europe. Vol. I: Universities in the Middle AgesA History of the University in Europe. Vol. II: Universities in Early Modern Europe (1500–1800)A History of the University in Europe, Volume 1: Universities in the Middle Ages
A History of the University in Europe is a four-volume book series on the history and development of the European university from the medieval origins of the institution until the present day.

Town and gown

town-gowntownietown-and-gown
This led to uneasy tensions with secular authorities—the demarcation between town and gown.
Students in the medieval universities enjoyed certain exemptions from the jurisdiction of the ordinary civil courts.