Mediterranean diet

MediterraneandietMediterranean staplesdiet, mediterraneanMediterranean-styleMediterranean-style diet
The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.wikipedia
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UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanityintangible cultural heritageUNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
UNESCO included the Mediterranean diet to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, Cyprus, and Croatia.

Gluten-related disorders

gluten intolerancegluten-sensitive enteropathygluten sensitivity
As the Mediterranean diet usually includes products containing gluten like pasta and bread, increasing use of the diet may have contributed to the growing rate of gluten-related disorders.
The increase may be explained by the progressive westernization of diet, the expanded reach of the Mediterranean diet (which includes a lot of foods that incorporate gluten), the growing replacement of rice by wheat in many countries, the development of new types of wheat with a higher amount of gluten peptides, and the higher content of gluten in bread and bakery products, due to the reduction of dough fermentation time.

Greece

Greek🇬🇷Greeks
UNESCO included the Mediterranean diet to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, Cyprus, and Croatia. The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.
Greek cuisine is characteristic of the healthy Mediterranean diet, which is epitomised by dishes of Crete.

Cardiovascular disease

heart diseasecardiac diseaseheart condition
There is preliminary evidence that regular consumption of olive oil may lower all-cause mortality and the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, and several chronic diseases.
Evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet may improve cardiovascular outcomes.

Italy

🇮🇹ItalianITA
UNESCO included the Mediterranean diet to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, Cyprus, and Croatia.
In comparison to other Western countries, Italy has a relatively low rate of adult obesity (below 10% ), as there are several health benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

Mediterranean Diet Pyramid

These proportions are sometimes represented in the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid.
It summarizes the Mediterranean Diet pattern of eating, suggesting the types and frequency of foods that should be enjoyed every day.

Monounsaturated fat

monounsaturatedmonounsaturated fatty acidsmonounsaturated fatty acid
The Mediterranean diet often is cited as beneficial for being low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber.
The Mediterranean diet is one heavily influenced by monounsaturated fats.

Ancel Keys

Dr. Ancel Keys
Although it was first publicized in 1975 by the American biologist Ancel Keys and chemist Margaret Keys (his wife and collaborator), the Mediterranean diet failed to gain widespread recognition until the 1990s.
He examined the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and was responsible for two famous diets: K-rations, formulated as balanced meals for combat soldiers in World War II, and the Mediterranean diet, which he popularized with his wife Margaret.

Alzheimer's disease

AlzheimerAlzheimer’sAlzheimer’s disease
According to a 2013 systematic review, greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is correlated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and slower cognitive decline.
People who maintain a healthy, Japanese, or Mediterranean diet have a reduced risk of AD. A Mediterranean diet may improve outcomes in those with the disease.

Gluten

glutinouswheat glutenglutin
As the Mediterranean diet usually includes products containing gluten like pasta and bread, increasing use of the diet may have contributed to the growing rate of gluten-related disorders.
This can possibly be explained by the growing westernization of diets, the increasing use of wheat-based foods included in the Mediterranean diet, the progressive replacement of rice by wheat in many countries in Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa, the development in recent years of new types of wheat with a higher amount of cytotoxic gluten peptides, and the higher content of gluten in bread and bakery products due to the reduction of dough fermentation time.

Mediterranean cuisine

MediterraneanMediterranean foodMediterranean restaurants
Although there are many different "Mediterranean diets" among different countries and populations of the Mediterranean basin, because of ethnical, cultural, economic and religious diversities, the distinct Mediterranean cuisines generally include the same key components, in addition to regular physical activity:
The cooking of the area is not to be confused with the Mediterranean diet, made popular because of the apparent health benefits of a diet rich in olive oil, wheat and other grains, fruits, vegetables, and a certain amount of seafood, but low in meat and dairy products.

Middle Eastern cuisine

Middle EasternMiddle EastWest Asia
In both North Africa and the Middle East, sheep's tail fat and rendered butter (samna) are traditional staple fats.
In North America, Middle Eastern food first came became popular in the 1990s with the so-called Mediterranean diet.

Seven Countries Study

Objective data showing that Mediterranean diet is healthful originated from results of epidemiological studies in Naples and Madrid, confirmed later by the Seven Countries Study first published in 1970, and a book-length report in 1980.
The Seven Countries Study was investigated further in regard to an eating pattern loosely characterized as the Mediterranean Diet. What exactly is meant by "Mediterranean Diet" today, was detailed by Antonia Trichopoulou (wife of Dimitrios Trichopoulos), and Anna Ferro-Luzzi.

Mediterranean Diet Foundation

Mediterranean Diet Foundation
The Mediterranean Diet Foundation (Fundación Dieta Mediterránea, F.D.M.) is a non-profit organization based in Barcelona that aims to promote the study, investigation and dissemination of the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

Sustainable diet

Sustainable diet
Other regionalized diets include the Mediterranean diet and the Nordic diet which emphasizes the consumption of local foodstuffs.

Fad diet

crash dietfad dietsfood faddism
By 2011, the Mediterranean diet was included by some authors as a fad diet promoted for losing weight.
Mediterranean diet

List of diets

crash dietDiets (list)invalid cookery
List of diets
Mediterranean diet: A diet based on habits of some southern European countries. One of the more distinct features is that olive oil is used as the primary source of fat.

Dieting

dietdietsweight loss
The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.

Southern Italy

Southern ItaliansouthernSouth
The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.

Spain

🇪🇸SpanishESP
UNESCO included the Mediterranean diet to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, Cyprus, and Croatia. The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.

Olive oil

oilextra virgin olive oilextra-virgin olive oil
The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.

Whole food

whole foodswholefoodswhole-food
The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.

Fish as food

fishfood fishtable fish
The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.

Cheese

cheesesrindCheese making
The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.

Yogurt

yoghurtdahicurd
The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.