A report on Mel Blanc and Tex Avery

Blanc in 1959
The cast of The Jack Benny Program, from left to right: Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Dennis Day, Phil Harris, Mary Livingstone, Jack Benny, Don Wilson, and Mel Blanc
Avery's yearbook photo, North Dallas High School, 1926
Blanc in 1975
Blanc's gravesite marker

In December 1936, Mel Blanc joined Leon Schlesinger Productions, which was producing theatrical cartoon shorts for Warner Bros. After sound man Treg Brown was put in charge of cartoon voices, and Carl Stalling became music director, Brown introduced Blanc to animation directors Tex Avery, Bob Clampett, Friz Freleng, and Frank Tashlin, who loved his voices.

- Mel Blanc

Daffy was an almost completely crazy "darn fool duck" who frequently bounced around the film frame in double-speed, screaming "Hoo-hoo! hoo-hoo" in a high-pitched, sped-up voice provided by the voice artist Mel Blanc, who, with this cartoon, also took over providing the voice of Porky Pig.

- Tex Avery
Blanc in 1959

13 related topics with Alpha

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Bugs Bunny

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Bugs' preliminary debut (as "Happy Rabbit") in Porky's Hare Hunt (1938).
Bugs' first appearance in A Wild Hare (1940).
Evolution of Bugs' design over the years.
Bugs as he appears in The Looney Tunes Show Season 2.
Mel Blanc was the original voice of Bugs and voiced the character for nearly five decades.
Bugs' star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Statue evoking Bugs Bunny at Butterfly Park Bangladesh.

Bugs Bunny is an animated cartoon character created in the late 1930s by Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) and voiced originally by Mel Blanc.

Bugs is best known for his starring roles in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated short films, produced by Warner Bros. Though an early prototype of the character first appeared in the WB cartoon Porky's Hare Hunt (1938) and a few subsequent shorts, the definitive characterization of Bugs Bunny is widely credited to have debuted in director Tex Avery's Oscar-nominated film A Wild Hare (1940), which Bob Givens is credited for Bugs Bunny's character design.

Looney Tunes opening title used in the 1947–1948 season

Looney Tunes

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American animated comedy short film series produced by Warner Bros. from 1930 to 1969, concurrently with the related Merrie Melodies, during the golden age of American animation.

American animated comedy short film series produced by Warner Bros. from 1930 to 1969, concurrently with the related Merrie Melodies, during the golden age of American animation.

Looney Tunes opening title used in the 1947–1948 season

However, the shorts gained a higher profile upon the debuts of directors Tex Avery and Chuck Jones and voice actor Mel Blanc later in the decade.

Porky Pig

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Animated character in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons.

Animated character in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons.

Bob Clampett's Porky Pig intro in 1938–1939

Tex Avery was hired to the studio in 1935, and his film Gold Diggers of '49 reused much of the cast from I Haven't Got a Hat, albeit in wildly different roles.

Mel Blanc replaced Dougherty in 1937.

Warner Bros. Cartoons

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The in-house animation division of Warner Bros. during the Golden Age of American animation.

The in-house animation division of Warner Bros. during the Golden Age of American animation.

Leon Schlesinger Productions studio, (also nicknamed Termite Terrace) part of the Old Warner Brothers Studio, 1351 North Van Ness Avenue, Los Angeles, CA
Former Leon Schlesinger-Warner Bros. Cartoons studio, 2003

Many of the creative staff members at the studio, including directors and animators such as Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson, Tex Avery, Robert Clampett, Arthur Davis, and Frank Tashlin, are considered major figures in the art and history of traditional animation.

Mel Blanc

Bob Clampett

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American animator, director, producer and puppeteer.

American animator, director, producer and puppeteer.

Porky in Wackyland was inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2000, deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
Clampett speaking at the 1976 San Diego Comic Convention

After Schlesinger realized he needed another unit, he made a deal with Tex Avery, naming Clampett his collaborator.

In addition, Mel Blanc (the voice actor who had worked with Clampett at the same studio for ten years) also accused Clampett of being an "egotist who took credit for everything."

Felix the Cat in The Goose That Laid the Golden Egg by Van Beuren

Golden age of American animation

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Period in the history of American animation that began with the popularization of sound cartoons in the late 1920s when animated films started to feature sound and gradually ended in the 1970s with the closing of Walter Lantz Productions and Terrytoons.

Period in the history of American animation that began with the popularization of sound cartoons in the late 1920s when animated films started to feature sound and gradually ended in the 1970s with the closing of Walter Lantz Productions and Terrytoons.

Felix the Cat in The Goose That Laid the Golden Egg by Van Beuren

Also in 1935, Schlesinger hired a new animation director who proceeded to revitalize the studio: Tex Avery.

This includes The Changing World, a series intended to educate the masses about the events that would lead up to World War II and starred Mel Blanc, and The Carpenters, a 1941 one-shot that also starred Blanc.

Schlesinger in 1917

Leon Schlesinger

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American film producer who founded Leon Schlesinger Productions, which later became the Warner Bros. Cartoons studio, during the Golden Age of American animation.

American film producer who founded Leon Schlesinger Productions, which later became the Warner Bros. Cartoons studio, during the Golden Age of American animation.

Schlesinger in 1917

Freleng's talent quickly shone through, and Schlesinger's hiring of Robert McKimson, Tex Avery, Chuck Jones and Frank Tashlin further increased the quality of the studio's output.

He later added Carl Stalling and Mel Blanc, and collectively these men created such famous characters as Porky Pig, Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny.

Elmer Fudd

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Animated cartoon character in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies series and the archenemy of Bugs Bunny.

Animated cartoon character in the Warner Bros. Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies series and the archenemy of Bugs Bunny.

"Egghead" as he appeared in 1939's A Day at the Zoo
Elmer Fudd, resembling Egghead early in his career, is annoyed by a rabbit in Elmer's Candid Camera.
Elmer in Rabbit Fire (1951)

But it was evidenced that the true origins of Elmer was that he was actually created by Fred "Tex" Avery in 1937, as a "Running Gag" character with small, sometimes squinty eyes, with a derby hat and with a green suit.' His aim is to hunt Bugs, but he usually ends up seriously injuring himself and other antagonizing characters.

Mel Blanc (as Egghead; Egghead Rides Again, and Egghead when he "woo-hoos" in Daffy Duck & Egghead).

Theatrical release poster by Steven Chorney

Who Framed Roger Rabbit

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1988 American live-action/animated comedy mystery film directed by Robert Zemeckis, produced by Frank Marshall and Robert Watts, and loosely adapted by Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman from Gary K. Wolf's 1981 novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit?.

1988 American live-action/animated comedy mystery film directed by Robert Zemeckis, produced by Frank Marshall and Robert Watts, and loosely adapted by Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman from Gary K. Wolf's 1981 novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit?.

Theatrical release poster by Steven Chorney
Bob Hoskins played the role of Eddie Valiant.
The plot incorporated the actual closing of Pacific Electric.
Judge Doom (played by Christopher Lloyd) threatens Roger Rabbit before introducing him to the dip. Mime artists, puppeteers, mannequins, and robotic arms were commonly used during filming to help the actors interact with "open air and imaginative cartoon characters".
Who Framed Roger Rabbit marks the first and only time in animation history that Disney's Mickey Mouse and Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny (as well as Donald Duck and Daffy Duck) have ever officially appeared on-screen together. Warners agreed that their biggest cartoon stars, Bugs and Daffy, would each receive an equal amount of screen time as Disney's Mickey and Donald.

Mel Blanc voiced Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, and Sylvester the Cat.

Zemeckis wanted the film to imbue "Disney's high quality of animation, Warner Bros.' characterization, and Tex Avery humor."

Lobby card

A Wild Hare

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Lobby card

A Wild Hare is a 1940 Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies cartoon directed by Tex Avery.

In a rare promotional broadcast, A Wild Hare was loosely adapted for the radio as a sketch performed by Mel Blanc and Arthur Q. Bryan on the April 11, 1941, edition of The Al Pearce Show.