Memory of the World Programme

Logo of the Memory of the World Programme
The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1789) was used to disseminate to the political community the first French Constitution.
The Jikji is the earliest known book printed with movable metal type in 1377.

International initiative launched to safeguard the documentary heritage of humanity against collective amnesia, neglect, the ravages of time and climatic conditions, and willful and deliberate destruction.

- Memory of the World Programme
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UNESCO

Specialised agency of the United Nations (UN) aimed at promoting world peace and security through international cooperation in education, arts, sciences and culture.

Specialised agency of the United Nations (UN) aimed at promoting world peace and security through international cooperation in education, arts, sciences and culture.

Flag of UNESCO
UNESCO offices in Brasília
UNESCO Institute for Water Education in Delft
The Garden of Peace at UNESCO headquarters
Carondelet Palace, Presidential Palace – with changing of the guards. The Historic Center of Quito, Ecuador, is one of the largest, least-altered and best-preserved historic centres in the Americas. This centre was, together with the historic centre of Kraków in Poland, the first to be declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO on 18 September 1978.

Memory of the World International Register, since 1997

Australia's The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906) is the first full-length narrative feature film produced anywhere in the world.

Memory of the World Register – Asia and the Pacific

Australia's The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906) is the first full-length narrative feature film produced anywhere in the world.
Cambodia’s Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum contains photographs of over 5,000 prisoners, as well as "confessions", many extracted under torture, and other biographical records.
The Rigveda is the fountain source of the so-called Aryan culture that spread beyond the Indian subcontinent.
The Shâhnâmeh (Book of Kings) of Iran is one of the classics of the Persian-speaking world, on a par with the Iliad and The Aeniad of the Greco-Roman cultural communities.
The Korean version of the Buddhist scriptures, Tripitaka Koreana, is one of the most important and most complete corpus of Buddhist doctrinal texts in the world.
The Holy Koran Mushaf of Othman manuscript, held by the Muslim Board of Uzbekistan, is the earliest existent written version of the Koran.

The first inscriptions on UNESCO's Memory of the World Register were made in 1997.

A Japanese soldier pictured with the corpses of Chinese civilians by Qinhuai River

Nanjing Massacre

The mass murder of Chinese civilians in Nanjing, the capital of the Republic of China, immediately after the Battle of Nanjing in the Second Sino-Japanese War, by the Imperial Japanese Army.

The mass murder of Chinese civilians in Nanjing, the capital of the Republic of China, immediately after the Battle of Nanjing in the Second Sino-Japanese War, by the Imperial Japanese Army.

A Japanese soldier pictured with the corpses of Chinese civilians by Qinhuai River
An article on the "Contest to kill 100 people using a sword" published in the Tokyo Nichi Nichi Shimbun. The headline reads, Incredible Record' (in the Contest to Cut Down 100 People) – Mukai 106–105 Noda – Both 2nd Lieutenants Go into Extra Innings".
A sword used in the "contest" is on display at the Republic of China Armed Forces Museum in Taipei, Taiwan
Prince Yasuhiko Asaka in 1935.
Iwane Matsui enters Nanjing.
Photo taken in Xuzhou, showing the body of a woman who was profaned in a way similar to the teenager described in case 5 of John Magee's film
Case 5 of John Magee's film: on December 13, 1937, about 30 Japanese soldiers murdered all but two of 11 Chinese in the house at No. 5 Xinlukou. A woman and her two teenaged daughters were raped, and Japanese soldiers rammed a bottle and a cane into her vagina. An eight-year-old girl was stabbed, but she and her younger sister survived. They were found alive two weeks after the killings by the elderly woman shown in the photo. Bodies of the victims can also be seen in the photo.
A boy killed by a Japanese soldier with the butt of a rifle, reportedly because he did not take off his hat
Bodies of Chinese massacred by Japanese troops along a river in Nanjing
A Chinese POW about to be beheaded by a Japanese officer using a shin-guntō
A mass grave from the Nanjing Massacre
Harold John Timperley's telegram of 17 January 1938 describing the atrocities
Photo in the album taken in Nanjing by Itou Kaneo of the Kisarazu Air Unit of the Imperial Japanese Navy
A picture of a dead child. Probably taken by Bernhard Sindberg
Prisoners being buried alive<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.history.ucsb.edu/faculty/marcuse/classes/133p/133p04papers/JChapelNanjing046.htm|first=Joseph|last=Chapel|title=Denial of the Holocaust and the Rape of Nanking|year=2004}}</ref>
Skeletons of the massacre's victims
The International Military Tribunal for the Far East was convened at "Ichigaya Court," formally Imperial Japanese Army HQ building in Ichigaya, Tokyo.
General Iwane Matsui<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.history.gr.jp/~koa_kan_non/16-4.html|title=「松井石根研究会」の必要性について|work=history.gr.jp|url-status=dead|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20110721122627/http://www.history.gr.jp/~koa_kan_non/16-4.html|archive-date=July 21, 2011}}</ref>
General Hisao Tani<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.people.com.cn/media/200112/12/NewsMedia_147412.jpg|access-date=March 26, 2009|url-status=dead|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20100218182317/http://www.people.com.cn/media/200112/12/NewsMedia_147412.jpg|archive-date=February 18, 2010|title=Hisao Tani}}</ref>
Yanziji Nanjing Massacre Memorial in 2004
A memorial stone at Yanziji in Nanjing, for victims in the Nanjing Massacre
John Rabe's former residence, now the "John Rabe and International Safety Zone Memorial Hall", in Nanjing, July 2008

On October 9, 2015, Documents of the Nanjing Massacre have been listed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

Movable type used to print the first known book printed with metal type, the Jikji, in Korea

Jikji

Abbreviated title of a Korean Buddhist document whose title can be translated to "Anthology of Great Buddhist Priests' Zen Teachings".

Abbreviated title of a Korean Buddhist document whose title can be translated to "Anthology of Great Buddhist Priests' Zen Teachings".

Movable type used to print the first known book printed with metal type, the Jikji, in Korea
Jikji, Selected Teachings of Buddhist Sages and Seon Masters, the earliest known book printed with movable metal type, 1377. Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris.

UNESCO confirmed Jikji as the world's oldest metalloid type in September 2001 and includes it in the Memory of the World Programme.

Baroque library hall in the National Library of the Czech Republic

National Library of the Czech Republic

Central library of the Czech Republic.

Central library of the Czech Republic.

Baroque library hall in the National Library of the Czech Republic
General reading room (former refectory of the Jesuit residence in Clementinum)

It also supported several pilot projects at the time of their creation and the first years of the UNESCO Memory of the World Programme (with the programme's first pilot project being from the National Library of the Czech Republic in 1993).

Portrait by Christoph Bernhard Francke, 1695

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

German polymath active as a mathematician, philosopher, scientist and diplomat.

German polymath active as a mathematician, philosopher, scientist and diplomat.

Portrait by Christoph Bernhard Francke, 1695
Engraving of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Stepped reckoner
Leibniz's correspondence, papers and notes from 1669 to 1704, National Library of Poland.
A page from Leibniz's manuscript of the Monadology
A diagram of I Ching hexagrams sent to Leibniz from Joachim Bouvet. The Arabic numerals were added by Leibniz.
Leibnizstrasse street sign Berlin
Commercium philosophicum et mathematicum (1745), a collection of letters between Leibnitz and Johann Bernoulli

The collection of manuscript papers of Leibniz at the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Bibliothek – Niedersächische Landesbibliothek was inscribed on UNESCO's Memory of the World Register in 2007.

Sopoanga in 2003

Saufatu Sopoanga

Tuvaluan politician who served as the eighth prime minister of Tuvalu from 2 August 2002 to 27 August 2004.

Tuvaluan politician who served as the eighth prime minister of Tuvalu from 2 August 2002 to 27 August 2004.

Sopoanga in 2003

In 2018, he became a member of Tuvalu's Memory of the World Committee.

Hudson's Bay Company

Historically Anglo-Canadian but now American-owned retail business group.

Historically Anglo-Canadian but now American-owned retail business group.

Heraldic achievement of Hudson's Bay Company: Argent, a cross gules between four beavers passant proper. Crest: On a chapeau gules turned up ermine a fox sejant proper. Supporters: Two bucks proper. Latin Motto: pro pelle cutem apparently a play on Job, 2:4: Pellem pro pelle "skin for skin".
Rupert's Land, the drainage basin of Hudson Bay, the company's grant
Map of Samuel Hearne's and Henry Kelsey's expeditions
Logo on old fur trading fort
Trading at a Hudson's Bay Company trading post
Hudson's Bay Company officials in an express canoe crossing a lake, 1825
A Hudson's Bay Company post on Lake Winnipeg, c. 1884
Sketches of Hudson Bay Life: Running them down, by Harry Bullock-Webster
Coming in for Christmas (H. Bullock Webster)
A rough and tumble with a grizzly (Harry Bullock-Webster)
Simpson Tower, the company's former headquarters
Jackson and Banting on the S. S. Beothic, 1927
HBC's coat of arms logo (used from 2009 to 2013)
The Hudson's Bay Company building in Montreal, originally the Morgan's flagship store
Hudson's Bay downtown store in Winnipeg
Hudson's Bay Queen Street store in downtown Toronto, the chain's flagship store
The red Olympic mittens first sold for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.
Depiction of the first sale of Hudson's Bay fur at Garraway's Coffee House in London, 1671.
Depiction of the capture of York Factory by French forces in 1694.
Depiction of an Indigenous woman wearing a Hudson's Bay point blanket, c. 1850.
Depiction of the Battle of Seven Oaks, a violent confrontation between HBC and the North West Company during the Pemmican War.
Currency issued by the Hudson Bay Company, 1820.
A section of a map showing the routes explored during the Palliser expedition.
Map of British North America in 1870, prior to HBC ceded Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory to Canada.
A HBC store in Vancouver, c. 1890s.
Hudson's Bay Montreal Downtown. Originally the flagship store for Morgan's, the department store chain was acquired by HBC in 1960.
The Bay Queen Street in Toronto, 1999. It was formerly the flagship store for Simpson's before HBC converted it to Hudson Bay in 1991.
Hudson's Bay department store in Rotterdam in 2018.
A Zellers liquidation centre operating in Ottawa in 2014. HBC closed its last Zellers in 2020.
Lord & Taylor at the Prudential Tower in Boston. HBC owned the chain from 2012 to 2019.
Saks Fifth Avenue flagship store. Saks Fifth Avenue is a chain owned by HBC since 2013.
A Galeria Kaufhof in Köln. The chain was owned by HBC from 2015 to 2019.
Alexandre Bilodeau, a winter Olympian for Canada, wearing HBC apparel made officially for the Canadian Olympic team.

In 2007, Hudson's Bay Company Archives became part of the United Nations "Memory of the World Programme" project, under UNESCO.

Hungary

Landlocked country in Central Europe.

Landlocked country in Central Europe.

Roman provinces: Illyricum, Macedonia, Dacia, Moesia, Pannonia, Thracia
Attila, king of the Huns (434/444–453)
Italian fresco – Hungarian warrior shooting backwards
Hungarian Conquest (of the Carpathian Basin) – painting by Mihály Munkácsy
Hungarian raids in the 10th century
King Saint Stephen, the first King of Hungary, converted the nation to Christianity.
The Holy Crown (Szent Korona), one of the key symbols of Hungary
Christ Pantocrator on the Holy Crown of Hungary. Hungary is traditionally a Christian country.
A map of lands ruled by Louis the Great
Western conquests of Matthias Corvinus
Painting commemorating the Siege of Eger, a major victory against the Ottomans
Francis II Rákóczi, leader of the war of independence against Habsburg rule in 1703–11
Count István Széchenyi offered one year's income to establish the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
Lajos Kossuth, Regent-President during the Hungarian Revolution of 1848
The Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen consisted of the territories of the Kingdom of Hungary (16) and the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia (17).
5 July 1848: The opening ceremony of the first parliament which was based on popular representation. The members of the first responsible government are on the balcony.
Coronation of Francis Joseph I and Elisabeth Amalie at Matthias Church, Buda, 8 June 1867
Hungarian-built dreadnought battleship SMS Szent István during World War I
With the Treaty of Trianon, Hungary lost 72% of its territory, its sea ports and 3,425,000 ethnic Hungarians
Miklós Horthy, Regent of the Kingdom of Hungary (1920–1944)
Kingdom of Hungary, 1941–44
Jewish women being arrested on Wesselényi Street in Budapest during the Holocaust, c. undefined 20–22 October 1944
The Széchenyi Chain Bridge and the Buda Castle in ruins after World War II (1946)
A destroyed Soviet tank in Budapest during the Revolution of 1956. Times Man of the Year for 1956 was the Hungarian Freedom Fighter.
János Kádár, General Secretary of MSZMP, the Hungarian Socialist Workers' Party (1956–1988)
The Visegrád Group signing ceremony in February 1991
Geographic map of Hungary
The Sándor Palace is the official residence of the President of Hungary.
The Hungarian Parliament Building on the banks of the Danube in Budapest
The original and future seat of the Curia, Hungary's highest court
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Meeting of the leaders of the Visegrád Group, Germany and France in 2013
United Nations conference in the assembly hall of the House of Magnates in the Hungarian Parliament Building
HDF 34th Special Forces Battalion
JAS 39 Gripen multirole combat aircraft
Hungary is part of the European Union's internal market with 508 million consumers and part of Schengen Area
A proportional representation of Hungary's exports, 2019
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Albert Szent-Györgyi won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of Vitamin C. The Nobel Prize has been awarded to 13 Hungarians.
Founded in 1782, the Budapest University of Technology and Economics is the oldest institute of technology in the world.
The research and development centre of Gedeon Richter Plc., one of the largest biotechnology companies in Central and Eastern Europe, in Budapest.
Siemens Desiro passenger trains on the Hungarian State Railways network, which is one of the densest in the world.
Population density in Hungary by district
Budapest
Towns and villages in Hungary
Regions of Central and Eastern Europe inhabited by Hungarian speakers today
King Saint Stephen offering the Hungarian crown to Virgin Mary – painting by Gyula Benczúr, in the St. Stephen's Basilica
Rector's Council Hall of Budapest Business School, the first public business school in the world, founded in 1857
Szent István Hospital on Üllői Avenue, Budapest. Together with Szent László Hospital, they form the largest hospital complex in Hungary, built at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Eszterháza Palace, the "Hungarian Versailles", in Fertőd, Győr-Moson-Sopron County
Romanesque Ják Abbey, Vas County, built between 1220 and 1256
The Museum of Applied Arts, an Art Nouveau building designed by Ödön Lechner
The Hungarian State Opera House on Andrássy út (a World Heritage Site)
Ferenc Liszt, one of the greatest pianists of all time; a renowned composer and conductor
Béla Bartók, a composer of great influence in the early 20th century; one of the founders of ethnomusicology
The alphabet of the Székely-Hungarian runiform; the country switched to the Latin alphabet during the reign of King Saint Stephen (1000–1038)
The oldest extant Hungarian poem, the Old Hungarian Lamentations of Mary (1190s)
Sándor Petőfi, Hungarian poet and revolutionary
Sándor Márai, Hungarian writer and journalist
Hortobágyi palacsinta in Sopron
Dobos torte
The famous Tokaji wine. It was called Vinum Regum, Rex Vinorum ("Wine of Kings, King of Wines") by Louis XIV of France.
Hungarians in traditional garments / folk costumes dancing the csárdás
Hungary men's national water polo team is considered among the best in the world, holding the world record for Olympic golds and overall medals.
The Groupama Aréna, home of Ferencvárosi TC, a UEFA Category 4 Stadium
Ferenc Puskás, the greatest top division scorer of the 20th century. The FIFA Puskás Award is named in his honour.

Items from the Bibliotheca Corviniana were inscribed on UNESCO's Memory of the World Register in 2005.

Cuajimalpa

Borough (demarcación territorial) in the Mexico City.

Borough (demarcación territorial) in the Mexico City.

In the Desierto de los Leones National Park
Map showing area of conservation
Facade of the Parish of San Pedro
Chapel of the former monastery
Crucifixion scene on Good Friday in Cuajimalpa
Torre Arcos 2

In 1997, the document was named as part of the “Memory of the World” by UNESCO.