Meno

Meno's paradoxeponymous dialogueme'''noMeno problem
Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.wikipedia
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Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
It appears to attempt to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.
In Protagoras and Meno, for example, he states that the separate virtues cannot exist independently and offers as evidence the contradictions of acting with wisdom, yet in an unjust way; or acting with bravery (fortitude), yet without wisdom.

Socratic dialogue

dialoguedialoguesSocratic literature
Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.
Meno

Plato

dialoguesPlato's dialoguesPlatonic dialogue
Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.
In the Meno Plato refers to the Eleusinian Mysteries, telling Meno he would understand Socrates's answers better if he could stay for the initiations next week.

Meno (general)

MenoMenonMenon III of Pharsalus
The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia. Plato's Meno is a Socratic dialogue in which the two main speakers, Socrates and Meno (also transliterated as Menon), discuss human virtue: whether or not it can be taught, and what it is.
Probably from Pharsalus, he is famous both for the eponymous dialogue written by Plato and his role as one of the generals leading different contingents of Greek mercenaries in Xenophon's Anabasis.

Anamnesis (philosophy)

anamnesisTheory of Recollectiondoctrine of recollection
In response to Meno's paradox (or the learner's paradox), however, Socrates introduces positive ideas: the immortality of the soul, the theory of knowledge as recollection (anamnesis), which Socrates demonstrates by posing a mathematical puzzle to one of Meno's slaves, the method of hypothesis, and, in the final lines, the distinction between knowledge and true belief. One feature of the dialogue is Socrates' use of one of Meno's slaves to demonstrate his idea of anamnesis, that certain knowledge is innate and "recollected" by the soul through proper inquiry.
In philosophy, anamnesis is a concept in Plato's epistemological and psychological theory that he develops in his dialogues Meno and Phaedo, and alludes to in his Phaedrus.

Meno's slave

house slaveone of Meno's slaves
In response to Meno's paradox (or the learner's paradox), however, Socrates introduces positive ideas: the immortality of the soul, the theory of knowledge as recollection (anamnesis), which Socrates demonstrates by posing a mathematical puzzle to one of Meno's slaves, the method of hypothesis, and, in the final lines, the distinction between knowledge and true belief. Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly.
Meno's slave is a character in the Socratic dialogue Meno, which was written by Plato.

Aporia

aporeticaporeticallyquizzicality
The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia.
After a number of such failed attempts, the interlocutor admits he is in aporia about the examined concept, concluding that he does not know what it is. In Plato's Meno (84a-c), Socrates describes the purgative effect of reducing someone to aporia: it shows someone who merely thought he knew something that he does not in fact know it and instills in him a desire to investigate it.

Anytus

Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly. Coincidentally Anytus appears, whom Socrates praises as the son of Anthemion, who earned his fortune with intelligence and hard work.
He is best remembered as one of the prosecutors of the philosopher Socrates, and is depicted as an interlocutor in Plato's Meno.

Innatism

innate ideasinnate ideainnate knowledge
Socrates begins one of the most influential dialogues of Western philosophy regarding the argument for inborn knowledge.
In Plato's Meno, he recalls a situation in which Socrates, his mentor, questioned a slave boy about a geometry theorem.

Trial of Socrates

trialdeath of Socratestrial for impiety and corruption
Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly.
Meno

Aristides

He alludes to other notable male figures, such as Themistocles, Aristides, Pericles and Thucydides, and casts doubt on whether these men produced sons as capable of virtue as themselves.
Aristides is praised by Socrates in Plato's dialogues Gorgias and Meno as an exceptional instance of good leadership.

Protagoras (dialogue)

ProtagorasPlato's ProtagorasProtagoras'' (dialogue)
Meno's theme is also dealt with in the dialogue Protagoras, where Plato ultimately has Socrates arrive at the opposite conclusion, that virtue can be taught.
Socrates' uses a similar example in the Meno.

Arete

ἀρετήaretēvirtue
It appears to attempt to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.

Socratic method

Socraticmaieuticelenchus
The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia.

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
Plato's Meno is a Socratic dialogue in which the two main speakers, Socrates and Meno (also transliterated as Menon), discuss human virtue: whether or not it can be taught, and what it is.

Thessaly

ThessalianThessaliansThessalia
Meno is visiting Athens from Thessaly with a large entourage of slaves attending him.

Gorgias

GorgianicGorgias of Leontiniparadoxologia
Young, good-looking and well-born, Meno is a student of Gorgias, a prominent sophist whose views on virtue clearly influence Meno's.

Sophist

sophistrysophistssophistic
Young, good-looking and well-born, Meno is a student of Gorgias, a prominent sophist whose views on virtue clearly influence Meno's.

Slavery in antiquity

slavesslaveslavery
One feature of the dialogue is Socrates' use of one of Meno's slaves to demonstrate his idea of anamnesis, that certain knowledge is innate and "recollected" by the soul through proper inquiry.

Fallacy

informal fallacyfallaciesSophists
Socrates responds to this sophistical paradox with a mythos (poetic story) according to which souls are immortal and have learned everything prior to transmigrating into the human body.

Palmette

anthemionanthemionsanthemia
Coincidentally Anytus appears, whom Socrates praises as the son of Anthemion, who earned his fortune with intelligence and hard work.

Themistocles

Naval Law of ThemistoclesThemistokleous
He alludes to other notable male figures, such as Themistocles, Aristides, Pericles and Thucydides, and casts doubt on whether these men produced sons as capable of virtue as themselves.

Pericles

PericleanPericlean AthensPeriklean
He alludes to other notable male figures, such as Themistocles, Aristides, Pericles and Thucydides, and casts doubt on whether these men produced sons as capable of virtue as themselves.

Thucydides, son of Melesias

ThucydidesThucydides son of Melesias
He alludes to other notable male figures, such as Themistocles, Aristides, Pericles and Thucydides, and casts doubt on whether these men produced sons as capable of virtue as themselves.

Defamation

libelslanderdefamatory
Anytus becomes offended and accuses Socrates of slander, warning him to be careful expressing such opinions.