Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.
MenoMeno's paradoxeponymous dialogueMeno problemme'''no

Virtue

virtuevirtuesvirtuous
It appears to attempt to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.
In Protagoras and Meno, for example, he states that the separate virtues cannot exist independently and offers as evidence the contradictions of acting with wisdom, yet in an unjust way; or acting with bravery (fortitude), yet without wisdom.

Meno (general)

MenoMenonMenon III of Pharsalus
The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia.
Probably from Pharsalus, he is famous both for the eponymous dialogue written by Plato and his role as one of the generals leading different contingents of Greek mercenaries in Xenophon's Anabasis.

Socratic dialogue

dialoguedialoguesSocratic literature
Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.

Anamnesis (philosophy)

anamnesisTheory of Recollectionmemory
In response to Meno's paradox (or the learner's paradox), however, Socrates introduces positive ideas: the immortality of the soul, the theory of knowledge as recollection (anamnesis), which Socrates demonstrates by posing a mathematical puzzle to one of Meno's slaves, the method of hypothesis, and, in the final lines, the distinction between knowledge and true belief.
In philosophy, anamnesis is a concept in Plato's epistemological and psychological theory that he develops in his dialogues Meno and Phaedo, and alludes to in his Phaedrus.

Plato

PlatoPlato’sdialogues
Meno (, Menōn) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.
Later in the Meno, Socrates uses a geometrical example to expound Plato's view that knowledge in this latter sense is acquired by recollection.

Meno's slave

one of Meno's slaveshouse slave
In response to Meno's paradox (or the learner's paradox), however, Socrates introduces positive ideas: the immortality of the soul, the theory of knowledge as recollection (anamnesis), which Socrates demonstrates by posing a mathematical puzzle to one of Meno's slaves, the method of hypothesis, and, in the final lines, the distinction between knowledge and true belief. Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly.
Meno's slave is a character in the Socratic dialogue Meno, which was written by Plato.

Anytus

Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly.
He is best remembered as one of the prosecutors of the philosopher Socrates, and is depicted as an interlocutor in Plato's Meno.

Aporia

aporiaaporeticaporetically
The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia.
After a number of such failed attempts, the interlocutor admits he is in aporia about the examined concept, concluding that he does not know what it is. In Plato's Meno (84a-c), Socrates describes the purgative effect of reducing someone to aporia: it shows someone who merely thought he knew something that he does not in fact know it and instills in him a desire to investigate it.

Innatism

innate ideasinnate ideainnatism
Socrates begins one of the most influential dialogues of Western philosophy regarding the argument for inborn knowledge.
In Plato's Meno, he recalls a situation in which Socrates, his mentor, questioned a slave boy about a geometry theorem.

Trial of Socrates

trial of Socratestrialdeath of Socrates
Additional participants in the dialogue include one of Meno's slaves and the Athenian politician Anytus, a prosecutor of Socrates with whom Meno is friendly.

Protagoras (dialogue)

ProtagorasProtagoras'' (dialogue)Plato's Protagoras
Meno's theme is also dealt with in the dialogue Protagoras, where Plato ultimately has Socrates arrive at the opposite conclusion, that virtue can be taught.
Socrates' uses a similar example in the Meno.

Aristides

He alludes to other notable male figures, such as Themistocles, Aristides, Pericles and Thucydides, and casts doubt on whether these men produced sons as capable of virtue as themselves.
Aristides is praised by Socrates in Plato's dialogues Gorgias and Meno as an exceptional instance of good leadership.

Plato's Problem

Plato's Problem is most clearly illustrated in the Meno dialogue, in which Socrates demonstrates that an uneducated boy nevertheless understands geometric principles.

Gettier problem

Gettier casesGettier problems#Fred Dreclarificationepistemic luck
Early instances are found in Plato's dialogues, notably Meno (97a–98b) and Theaetetus.

Theory of justification

justificationwarrantjustified
This is in part because of the influence of the definition of knowledge as "justified true belief" often associated with a theory discussed near the end of the Plato's dialogues Meno and Theaetetus.

Meno (disambiguation)

Meno is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.

Foundations of mathematics

foundations of mathematicsfoundation of mathematicsfoundations
In the Meno Plato's teacher Socrates asserts that it is possible to come to know this truth by a process akin to memory retrieval.

List of speakers in Plato's dialogues

SisyphusSisyphus of PharsalusThe Athenian stranger to Megillus and Clinias

Talk (play)

TalkTalk'' (play)
Influenced by Euripides' play The Bacchae, the entire play is held in the ruins of a museum of Greek antiquities, and has characters inspired by the Socratic dialogues (Phaedo, Crito, Meno, Apollodorus, and Ion) written by Plato, which attempts to determine the definition of virtue and the meaning of art.

Daedalus

DaedalusDedalusGreat Daedala
The Greek philosopher Socrates claimed to be a descendant of Daedalus in at least three of Plato's books: Euthyphro, Alcibaides, and Meno.

Latin translations of the 12th century

translated into LatinLatin translationLatin translations
Aristippus, himself, translated Plato's Meno and Phaedo into Latin, but it was left to an anonymous student at Salerno to travel to Sicily and translate the Almagest, as well as several works by Euclid, from Greek to Latin.

List of unsolved problems in philosophy

philosophical problemphilosophical problemsmany philosophical problems
Plato suggests, in his Theaetetus (210a) and Meno (97a–98b), that "knowledge" may be defined as justified true belief.

Paradox of analysis

paradox of analysis
Although the problem takes its origin from the conflict in Plato's Meno, it was formulated in its complete form by philosopher G. E. Moore in his book Principia Ethica, and first named by C. H. Langford in his 1942 article "The Notion of Analysis in Moore's Philosophy".