Mental prayer

mentallyprayer
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.wikipedia
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Teresa of Ávila

Teresa of AvilaSaint Teresa of ÁvilaSaint Teresa of Avila
One of the foremost writers on mental prayer, Teresa of Avila, stated: "Contemplative prayer [oración mental] is nothing else than a close sharing between friends; it means taking time frequently to be alone with him who we know loves us." Among the Carmelites, there was no regulation for mental prayer until Teresa of Avila introduced it, practicing it for two hours daily.
A Carmelite nun, prominent Spanish mystic, religious reformer, author, theologian of the contemplative life and mental prayer, she earned the rare distinction of being declared a Doctor of the Church over four centuries after her death.

Christian meditation

meditationmeditationsconcentrate intensely
According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, meditation and contemplation which take place in mental prayer are "major expressions of the life of prayer" in the Christian tradition.
In The Way of Perfection, St. Theresa of Avila taught her nuns how to try to get to know Christ by using meditation and mental prayer.

Mother Teresa

Mother Teresa of CalcuttaTeresa of CalcuttaSaint Teresa of Calcutta
The practice of mental prayer is necessary for reaching the goal of Christian perfection, said Mother Teresa.
She wrote, "It is only by mental prayer and spiritual reading that we can cultivate the gift of prayer."

Alphonsus Liguori

St. Alphonsus LiguoriAlphonsus Maria de LiguoriSaint Alphonsus Liguori
Alphonsus Liguori, the Catholic Church's Doctor of moral theology, in his work Necessity and Power of Prayer, The Great Means of Salvation and Perfection, explained: "Mental prayer is the blessed furnace in which souls are inflamed with the love of God. All the saints have become saints by mental prayer."

Prayer

prayprayerspraying
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

Dialogue

dialoguesdialogspoken dialogue
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

Meditation

meditativemeditatemeditating
Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

Catechism of the Catholic Church

CatechismCatholic CatechismCompendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church
According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, meditation and contemplation which take place in mental prayer are "major expressions of the life of prayer" in the Christian tradition.

Christian contemplation

theoriacontemplative prayercontemplation
According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, meditation and contemplation which take place in mental prayer are "major expressions of the life of prayer" in the Christian tradition. Mental prayer is a form of prayer recommended in the Catholic Church whereby one loves God through dialogue, meditating on God's words, and contemplation of Christ's face.

Christian perfection

entire sanctificationperfectionsanctification
The practice of mental prayer is necessary for reaching the goal of Christian perfection, said Mother Teresa.

Ignatius of Loyola

St. Ignatius of LoyolaIgnatius LoyolaSaint Ignatius of Loyola
Ignatius of Loyola, the Church's patron of retreats, popularized meditation and contemplation through his thirty-day retreat or Spiritual Exercises, which he customarily administered to laypersons.

John Cassian

CassianSaint John CassianCassianus
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

John Climacus

Johannes ClimacusJohn of the LadderSt. John Climacus
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Augustine of Hippo

AugustineSt. AugustineSaint Augustine
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

John Chrysostom

ChrysostomSt. John ChrysostomSaint John Chrysostom
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Jerome

Saint JeromeSt. JeromeSt Jerome
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Basil

Ocimum basilicumsweet basilbasil seeds
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Boethius

Anicius Manlius Severinus BoethiusBoëthiusBoetius
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Bernard of Clairvaux

St. BernardSaint Bernard of ClairvauxSaint Bernard
John Cassian (5th century) and John Climacus (6th century) discussed the ways of mental prayer, and many Fathers of the Church gave their own recommendations for it: Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Jerome, Basil, Boethius, and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Dominican Order

DominicanO.P.Dominicans
Early in the sixteenth century, the Dominican chapter of Milan prescribed mental prayer for half an hour during the morning and the evening.

Franciscans

FranciscanFranciscan OrderFriars Minor
Among the Franciscans, there is mention of methodical mental prayer about the middle of that century.

Carmelites

CarmeliteCarmelite OrderO. Carm.
Among the Carmelites, there was no regulation for mental prayer until Teresa of Avila introduced it, practicing it for two hours daily.

Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola

Spiritual ExercisesSpiritual Exercises of St. IgnatiusIgnatian exercises
Ignatius of Loyola, the Church's patron of retreats, popularized meditation and contemplation through his thirty-day retreat or Spiritual Exercises, which he customarily administered to laypersons.