Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage

Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English UsageEnglish usageMerriam-Webster DictionaryMerriam-Webster's DictionaryMerriam-Webster's Dictionary of English UsageThe Merriam-Webster Dictionary
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage is a usage dictionary published by Merriam-Webster, Inc., of Springfield, Massachusetts.wikipedia
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Merriam-Webster

Merriam WebsterMerriam–WebsterG. & C. Merriam Company
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage is a usage dictionary published by Merriam-Webster, Inc., of Springfield, Massachusetts.
Merriam-Webster has also published dictionaries of synonyms, English usage, geography (Merriam-Webster's Geographical Dictionary), biography, proper names, medical terms, sports terms, slang, Spanish/English, and numerous others.

Language-for-specific-purposes dictionary

usage dictionaryLanguage for specific purposes dictionaryLSP dictionary
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage is a usage dictionary published by Merriam-Webster, Inc., of Springfield, Massachusetts.

Rebranding

rebrandedrebrandre-branded
It was added as part of the rebranding campaign to emphasize the differences between Merriam–Webster's dictionaries and dictionaries of other publishers using the generic trademark Webster's.)

Generic trademark

genericized trademarkgenericizedgeneric
It was added as part of the rebranding campaign to emphasize the differences between Merriam–Webster's dictionaries and dictionaries of other publishers using the generic trademark Webster's.)

Geoffrey K. Pullum

Geoffrey PullumPullum, Geoffrey K.Geoff Pullum
It is critically acclaimed by the linguist Geoffrey Pullum, who calls it "the best usage book I know of... utterly wonderful."

Linguistic description

descriptivedescriptive linguisticslinguistic analysis
It is known for its historical scholarship, analysis, use of examples, and descriptive approach.

Garner's Modern English Usage

Garner's Modern American UsageA Dictionary of Modern American UsageModern American Usage

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines a people as "a body of persons that are united by a common culture, tradition, or sense of kinship, which typically have common language, institutions, and beliefs, and often constitute a politically organized group".

The Sense of Style

Pinker's prescriptions combine data from ballots given to the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary, the usage notes of several dictionaries and style guides, the historical analyses in Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, the meta-analysis in Roy Copperud's American Usage and Style: The Consensus, and views from modern linguistics represented in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language and the blog Language Log.

Apostrophe

apostrophespossessive apostrophe
In the words of Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage:

Fewer versus less

Fewer vs. lessfewerless", rather than "fewer
Some prescriptivists argue that even the extremely rare and completely unidiomatic "one fewer" should be used instead of "one less" (both when used alone or together with a singular, discretely quantifiable noun as in "there is one fewer cup on this table"), but Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage clearly states that common usage dictates "one less" in all cases.

Kombucha

BoochFermented teaKombucha (tea mushroom)
The Merriam-Webster Dictionary maintains that the use of kombucha in the English language likely stems from the misapplication of Japanese words: konbucha, kobucha (which translate to "tea made from kelp"), kobu, konbu (which mean "kelp") and cha (meaning “tea”).

Shall and will

shall'' and ''willshallwill
According to Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, the distinction between shall and will as future markers arose from the practice of Latin teaching in English schools in the 14th century.

Passive voice

passivepassivizationpassives
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage refers to three statistical studies of passive versus active sentences in various periodicals, stating: "the highest incidence of passive constructions was 13 percent. Orwell runs to a little over 20 percent in "Politics and the English Language". Clearly he found the construction useful in spite of his advice to avoid it as much as possible".

History of linguistic prescription in English

Thus, works such as the Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, appearing in 1993, attempt to describe usage issues of words and syntax as they are actually used by writers of note, rather than to judge them by standards derived from logic, fine distinctions, or Latin grammar.

Politics and the English Language

Politics and the English Language: The Six Rules
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage refers to three statistical studies of passive versus active sentences in various periodicals, stating: "the highest incidence of passive constructions was 13 percent. Orwell runs to a little over 20 percent in 'Politics and the English Language'. Clearly he found the construction useful in spite of his advice to avoid it as much as possible".

False title

Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage agrees that the construction is "highly unlikely outside journalism".

Split infinitive

splitLayamon examplesplit infinitives
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage says: "the objection to the split infinitive has never had a rational basis".

Inanimate whose

inanimate ''whoseto things as well as persons
Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage states that, amongst "the current books" that discussed the subject as of the late 20th century, "not one of them finds [inanimate] whose anything but standard".