Metalloid

metalloidsMetallicmetalloid staircasemetaloidsemi-metalsemi-minerals
A metalloid is a type of chemical element which has properties in between, or that are a mixture of, those of metals and nonmetals.wikipedia
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Silicon

Sisilicon revolutionsilicium
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
It is a hard and brittle crystalline solid with a blue-grey metallic lustre; and it is a tetravalent metalloid and semiconductor.

Germanium

GeGe diodesGerman
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
It is a lustrous, hard-brittle, grayish-white metalloid in the carbon group, chemically similar to its group neighbours silicon and tin.

Arsenic

AsAs 2 Arsenate
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
Arsenic is a metalloid.

Antimony

Sbantimonialantimonium
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
A lustrous gray metalloid, it is found in nature mainly as the sulfide mineral stibnite (Sb 2 S 3 ).

Tellurium

Tenative telluriumtelluride
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
It is a brittle, mildly toxic, rare, silver-white metalloid.

Boron

Bboron-10 10 B
The six commonly recognised metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium.
Elemental boron is a metalloid that is found in small amounts in meteoroids but chemically uncombined boron is not otherwise found naturally on Earth.

Metal

metalsmetal ionsmetal ion
A metalloid is a type of chemical element which has properties in between, or that are a mixture of, those of metals and nonmetals.
In chemistry, two elements that would otherwise qualify (in physics) as brittle metals—arsenic and antimony—are commonly instead recognised as metalloids, on account of their predominately non-metallic chemistry.

Selenium

SeSe 3 selenium poisoning
Five elements are less frequently so classified: carbon, aluminium, selenium, polonium, and astatine.
It is a nonmetal (more rarely considered a metalloid) with properties that are intermediate between the elements above and below in the periodic table, sulfur and tellurium, and also has similarities to arsenic.

Nonmetal

non-metalReactive nonmetalnon-metals
A metalloid is a type of chemical element which has properties in between, or that are a mixture of, those of metals and nonmetals.
Metalloids such as boron, silicon, and germanium are sometimes counted as nonmetals.

Semiconductor

semiconductorssemiconductingsemiconductor material
They and their compounds are used in alloys, biological agents, catalysts, flame retardants, glasses, optical storage and optoelectronics, pyrotechnics, semiconductors, and electronics.
Some examples of semiconductors are silicon, germanium, gallium arsenide, and elements near the so-called "metalloid staircase" on the periodic table.

Astatine

AtAlabamiumelement 85
Five elements are less frequently so classified: carbon, aluminium, selenium, polonium, and astatine.
Astatine is usually classified as either a nonmetal or a metalloid; metal formation has also been predicted.

Properties of metals, metalloids and nonmetals

Periodic table (metals and non-metals)intermediate in natureperiodic table
Most of their other physical and chemical properties are intermediate in nature.
The chemical elements can be broadly divided into metals, metalloids and nonmetals according to their shared physical and chemical properties.

Post-transition metal

other metalPost-transition metalsB metals
The p-block metals, and nonmetals (such as carbon or nitrogen) that can form alloys with metals or modify their properties have also occasionally been considered as metalloids.
Post-transition metals are a set of metallic elements in the periodic table located between the transition metals to their left, and the metalloids to their right.

Chemical element

elementelementschemical elements
A metalloid is a type of chemical element which has properties in between, or that are a mixture of, those of metals and nonmetals.
A first distinction is between metals, which readily conduct electricity, nonmetals, which do not, and a small group, (the metalloids), having intermediate properties and often behaving as semiconductors.

Zinc

ZnZn 2+ zinc alloy
These elements include hydrogen, beryllium, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, zinc, gallium, tin, iodine, lead, bismuth, and radon.
Binary compounds of zinc are known for most of the metalloids and all the nonmetals except the noble gases.

Periodic table

periodic table of elementsperiodic table of the elementsperiodic system
This can be found, in varying configurations, on some periodic tables.
The p-block comprises the last six groups, which are groups 13 to 18 in IUPAC group numbering (3A to 8A in American group numbering) and contains, among other elements, all of the metalloids.

Oxide

oxidesmetal oxideO
Chemically, they mostly behave as (weak) nonmetals, have intermediate ionization energies and electronegativity values, and amphoteric or weakly acidic oxides.
Metals tend to form basic oxides, non-metals tend to form acidic oxides, and amphoteric oxides are formed by elements near the boundary between metals and non-metals (metalloids).

Lists of metalloids

such lists
On average, seven elements are included in such lists; individual classification arrangements tend to share common ground and vary in the ill-defined margins.
This is a list of 194 sources that each list metalloids: elements classified as metalloids.

Silicone

siliconespolysiloxanesilicone gel
Silicone gel can be applied to badly burned patients to reduce scarring.
Silicon is a chemical element, a hard dark-grey semiconducting metalloid which in its crystalline form is used to make integrated circuits ("electronic chips") and solar cells.

Intermetallic

intermetallic compoundintermetallic compoundsintermetallics
Writing early in the history of intermetallic compounds, the British metallurgist Cecil Desch observed that "certain non-metallic elements are capable of forming compounds of distinctly metallic character with metals, and these elements may therefore enter into the composition of alloys".
In common use, the research definition, including post-transition metals and metalloids, is extended to include compounds such as cementite, Fe 3 C. These compounds, sometimes termed interstitial compounds, can be stoichiometric, and share similar properties to the intermetallic compounds defined above.

Period (periodic table)

periodperiodsperiod 3
Going along a period, the nuclear charge increases with atomic number as do the number of electrons.
Completing the fourth period are the post-transition metals zinc and gallium, the metalloids germanium and arsenic, and the nonmetals selenium, bromine, and krypton.

Type metal

metalmetal type
Its alloys include pewter (a tin alloy with up to 20% antimony) and type metal (a lead alloy with up to 25% antimony).
Antimony (Sb) is a metalloid element, which melts at 630 C. Antimony has a crystalline appearance while being both brittle and fusible.

Block (periodic table)

d-blockp-blockf-block
On a standard periodic table, all eleven elements are located in a diagonal region of the p-block extending from boron at the upper left to astatine at lower right.
This block is the only one having all three types of elements: metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.

Stibnite

antimony sulfideAntimony glanceantimony sulphide
Antimony trisulfide Sb 2 S 3 is found in white-light fireworks and in flash and sound mixtures.
It is the most important source for the metalloid antimony.

Dividing line between metals and nonmetals

metal-nonmetal border
Some periodic tables include a dividing line between metals and nonmetals and the metalloids may be found close to this line.
One line separates metals and metalloids; the other metalloids and nonmetals.