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Club drug

club drugsparty drugsdrug use
Methaqualone became increasingly popular as a recreational drug and club drug in the late 1960s and 1970s, known variously as "ludes" or "sopers" (also "soaps") in the U.S. and "mandrakes" and "mandies" in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.
Club drugs range from entactogens such as MDMA ("ecstasy"), 2C-B ("nexus") and inhalants (e.g., nitrous oxide and poppers) to stimulants (e.g., amphetamine and cocaine), depressants/sedatives (Quaaludes, GHB, Rohypnol) and psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs (LSD, magic mushrooms and DMT).

Muscle relaxant

skeletal muscle relaxantmuscle relaxantsmuscle relaxation
Its use peaked in the early 1970s for the treatment of insomnia, and as a sedative and muscle relaxant.
Other skeletal muscle relaxants of that type used around the world come from a number of drug categories and other drugs used primarily for this indication include orphenadrine (anticholinergic), chlorzoxazone, tizanidine (clonidine relative), diazepam, tetrazepam and other benzodiazepines, mephenoxalone, methocarbamol, dantrolene, baclofen, Drugs once but no longer or very rarely used to relax skeletal muscles include meprobamate, barbiturates, methaqualone, glutethimide and the like; some subcategories of opioids have muscle relaxant properties, and some are marketed in combination drugs with skeletal and/or smooth muscle relaxants such as whole opium products, some ketobemidone, piritramide and fentanyl preparations and Equagesic.

Hypnotic

sleeping pillssleeping pillsoporific
Methaqualone, formerly sold under the brand name Quaalude and Mandrax, was a sedative and hypnotic medication.
Examples of quinazolinones include cloroqualone, diproqualone, etaqualone (Aolan, Athinazone, Ethinazone), mebroqualone, mecloqualone (Nubarene, Casfen), and methaqualone (Quaalude).

Recreational drug use

recreational drugdrug usedrugs
Methaqualone became increasingly popular as a recreational drug and club drug in the late 1960s and 1970s, known variously as "ludes" or "sopers" (also "soaps") in the U.S. and "mandrakes" and "mandies" in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.
methaqualone (Sopor, Mandrax; "Quaaludes")

Quinazolinone

quinazolone
It is a member of the quinazolinone class.
Methaqualone (Quaalude)

Drug overdose

overdoseoverdosingoverdosed
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.
Methaqualone

Mecloqualone

The DEA has also added the methaqualone analogue mecloqualone (also a result of some incomplete clandestine syntheses) to Schedule I
Mecloqualone (Nubarene, Casfen) is a Quinazolinone-class GABAergic and is an analogue of methaqualone that was first made in 1960 and marketed mainly in France and some other European countries.

Bill Cosby sexual assault cases

sexual assault allegationssexual assault accusationsBill Cosby allegations
Bill Cosby sexual assault allegations
In his testimony, Cosby admitted to casual sex involving recreational use of the sedative-hypnotic methaqualone (Quaaludes) with a series of young women, and he acknowledged that his dispensing the prescription drug was illegal.

Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

Schedule IVSchedule ISchedule 1
In Canada, methaqualone is listed in Schedule III of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and requires a prescription but is Schedule I according to NAPRA.
Methaqualone (2-methyl-3-(2-methylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone) and any salt thereof

Controlled Substances Act

Schedule ISchedule IIschedule III
In the United States it was withdrawn in 1982 and made a Schedule I drug in 1984.
Methaqualone (Quaalude, Sopor, Mandrax), a sedative that was previously used for similar purposes as barbiturates, until it was rescheduled.

Syed Husain Zaheer

Methaqualone was first synthesized in India in 1951 by Indra Kishore Kacker and Syed Husain Zaheer, for use as an antimalarial drug.
In 1951, along with Indra Kishore Kacker, he was the first to synthesize Methaqualone.

Sedative

sedativessedative-hypnoticsedating
Its use peaked in the early 1970s for the treatment of insomnia, and as a sedative and muscle relaxant. Methaqualone, formerly sold under the brand name Quaalude and Mandrax, was a sedative and hypnotic medication. Methaqualone is a sedative that increases the activity of the GABA receptors in the brain and nervous system.

Insomnia

sleeplessnesstrouble sleepingdifficulty sleeping
Its use peaked in the early 1970s for the treatment of insomnia, and as a sedative and muscle relaxant.

Free base

freebasingfreebasefree-base
The substance was sold both as a free base and as salt (hydrochloride).

GABA receptor

GABAGABA A receptorsGABA A
Methaqualone is a sedative that increases the activity of the GABA receptors in the brain and nervous system.

Pregnancy category

pregnancy category Cpregnancy category Dpregnancy categories
Methaqualone was not recommended for use while pregnant and is in pregnancy category D.

Delirium

deliriouscognitive impairmentsconfusion
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Convulsion

convulsionsconvulsiveconvulsing
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Hypertonia

muscle rigidityhypertonicmuscle hypertonia
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Hyperreflexia

Hyperactive reflexesoverresponsive reflexesAbnormally fast reflexes
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Vomiting

emeticvomitemesis
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Kidney failure

renal failurekidney problemsrenal impairment
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Coma

comatoseunresponsivecomatose state
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Death

mortalitydeaddeceased
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Cardiac arrest

sudden cardiac deathsudden deathcardiopulmonary arrest
An overdose can cause delirium, convulsions, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death through cardiac or respiratory arrest.