Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodistsWesleyanWesleyansMethodist movementMethodist chapelMethodist ChurchesUnited MethodistWesleyan Methodist
Methodism, also known as the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their practice and belief from the life and teachings of John Wesley.wikipedia
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George Whitefield

George WhitfieldWhitefieldReverend George Whitefield
George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley were also significant early leaders in the movement. Conversely, George Whitefield (1714–1770), Howell Harris (1714–1773), and Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon (1707–1791) were notable for being Calvinistic Methodists.
George Whitefield (27 December 1714 – 30 September 1770), also spelled Whitfield, was an English Anglican cleric and evangelist who was one of the founders of Methodism and the evangelical movement.

Charles Wesley

CharlesWesleyWesley, Charles
George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley were also significant early leaders in the movement.
Charles Wesley (18 December 1707 – 29 March 1788) was an English leader of the Methodist movement, most widely known for writing about 6,500 hymns.

John Wesley

JohnWesleyanWesley
Methodism, also known as the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their practice and belief from the life and teachings of John Wesley.
John Wesley (28 June 1703 – 2 March 1791) was an English cleric, theologian and evangelist who was a leader of a revival movement within the Church of England known as Methodism.

Imparted righteousness

imparted
Distinguishing Methodist doctrines include the new birth, assurance, imparted righteousness, the possibility of entire sanctification, the works of piety, and the primacy of Scripture.
Imparted righteousness, in Methodist theology, is that gracious gift of God given at the moment of the new birth which enables a Christian disciple to strive for holiness and sanctification.

United Methodist Church

United MethodistMethodistThe United Methodist Church
Denominations that descend from the British Methodist tradition are generally less ritualistic, while American Methodism is more so, the United Methodist Church in particular. Many Methodist bodies, such as the African Methodist Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church, base their doctrinal standards on Wesley's Articles of Religion, an abridgment of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England that excised its Calvinist features.
The United Methodist Church (UMC) is a mainline Protestant denomination and a major part of Methodism.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Methodism, also known as the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their practice and belief from the life and teachings of John Wesley.
Adventist, Baptist, Methodist, Pentecostal, and other Protestant confessions arose in the following centuries.

Christian revival

revivalrevivalismrevivalist
It originated as a revival movement within the 18th-century Church of England and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death.
The Methodist revival of John Wesley, Charles Wesley and George Whitefield in England and Daniel Rowland, Howel Harris and William Williams, Pantycelyn in Wales and the Great Awakening in America prior to the Revolution.

Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon

Selina, Countess of HuntingdonCountess of HuntingdonLady Huntingdon
Conversely, George Whitefield (1714–1770), Howell Harris (1714–1773), and Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon (1707–1791) were notable for being Calvinistic Methodists.
Selina, Countess of Huntingdon (24 August 1707 – 17 June 1791) was an English religious leader who played a prominent part in the religious revival of the 18th century and the Methodist movement in England and Wales.

High church

high-churchHigh AnglicanHigh
The movement has a wide variety of forms of worship, ranging from high church to low church in liturgical usage.
Other contemporary denominations that contain high church wings include some Lutheran, Presbyterian, and Methodist churches.

Holy Club

Oxford Methodist SocietyThe Oxford Holy Club
The Wesley brothers founded the "Holy Club" at the University of Oxford, where John was a fellow and later a lecturer at Lincoln College.
The "Holy Club" was an organization at Christ Church, Oxford, formed in 1729 by brothers John and Charles Wesley, who later contributed to the formation of the Methodist Church.

Arminianism

ArminianArminiansArminian theology
Most Methodists teach that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, died for all of humanity and that salvation is available for all; in theology, this view is known as Arminianism.
Many Christian denominations have been influenced by Arminian views on the will of man being freed by Grace prior to regeneration, notably the Baptists in the 16th century, the Methodists in the 18th century and the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the 19th century.

Works of mercy

corporal works of mercySeven Works of Mercyacts of mercy
In addition to evangelism, Methodism emphasises charity and support for the sick, the poor, and the afflicted through the works of mercy.
In addition, the Methodist church teaches that the works of mercy are a means of grace which lead to holiness and aid in sanctification.

Christian denomination

denominationdenominationsChristian denominations
Methodism, also known as the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their practice and belief from the life and teachings of John Wesley.
As such, diverse groups such as Adventists, Anabaptists, Baptists, Binitarians, Charismatics, Congregationalists, Evangelicals, Holiness churches, Methodists, Moravians, Pentecostals, Presbyterians, Reformed, and Unitarians (depending on one's classification scheme) are all a part of the same family but have distinct doctrinal variations within each group – Lutherans see themselves not to be a part of the rest of what they call "Reformed Protestantism" due to radical differences in sacramental theology and historical approach to the Reformation itself (both Reformed and Lutherans see their reformation in the sixteenth century to be a 'reforming' of the Catholic Church, not a rejection of it entirely).

Assurance (theology)

assuranceassurance of salvationassurance of faith
Distinguishing Methodist doctrines include the new birth, assurance, imparted righteousness, the possibility of entire sanctification, the works of piety, and the primacy of Scripture.
Based on the writings of St. Augustine of Hippo, assurance was historically a very important doctrine in Lutheranism and Calvinism, and remains a distinguishing doctrine of Methodism.

Black church

African-American churchBlack Protestantblack churches
In the United States, it became the religion of many slaves who later formed black churches in the Methodist tradition.
Evangelical Baptist and Methodist preachers traveled throughout the South in the Great Awakening of the late 18th century.

African Methodist Episcopal Church

African Methodist EpiscopalAME ChurchAME
Many Methodist bodies, such as the African Methodist Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church, base their doctrinal standards on Wesley's Articles of Religion, an abridgment of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England that excised its Calvinist features.
The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the A.M.E. Church or AME, is a predominantly African-American Methodist denomination.

Articles of Religion (Methodist)

Articles of ReligionMethodist Articles of ReligionArticles of Religion of the Methodist Church
Many Methodist bodies, such as the African Methodist Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church, base their doctrinal standards on Wesley's Articles of Religion, an abridgment of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England that excised its Calvinist features.
The Articles of Religion are an official doctrinal statement of Methodism.

Christian perfection

entire sanctificationperfectionsanctification
Distinguishing Methodist doctrines include the new birth, assurance, imparted righteousness, the possibility of entire sanctification, the works of piety, and the primacy of Scripture.
It is also taught in mainline Methodist churches and those of the holiness movement, in which it is usually known as Wesleyan perfection, Christian perfection or entire sanctification.

Wesleyan theology

WesleyanWesleyan-ArminianWesleyanism
Wesleyan theology, which is upheld by the Methodist Churches, focuses on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian.
Wesleyan–Arminian theology, manifest today in Methodism (inclusive of the Holiness movement), is named for its founders, the Wesleys, as well as for Jacob Arminius, since it is a subset of Arminian theology.

Book of Common Prayer

Prayer BookThe Book of Common Prayer1662 Book of Common Prayer
George Whitefield's preference for extemporaneous prayer rather than the fixed forms of prayer in the Book of Common Prayer, in addition to his insistence on the necessity of the New Birth, set him at odds with Anglican clergy.
Traditional English Lutheran, Methodist and Presbyterian prayer books have borrowed from the Book of Common Prayer and the marriage and burial rites have found their way into those of other denominations and into the English language.

Evangelicalism

evangelicalevangelical ChristianEvangelicals
At a Moravian service in Aldersgate on 24 May 1738, John experienced what has come to be called his evangelical conversion, when he felt his "heart strangely warmed".
Its origins are usually traced to 1738, with various theological streams contributing to its foundation, including English Methodism, the Moravian Church (in particular its bishop Nicolaus Zinzendorf and his community at Herrnhut), and German Lutheran Pietism.

Holiness movement

HolinessHoliness churchesHoliness Church
Methodism, inclusive of the holiness movement, thus teaches that "justification [is made] conditional on obedience and progress in sanctification", emphasizing "a deep reliance upon Christ not only in coming to faith, but in remaining in the faith."
The Holiness movement involves a set of beliefs and practices which emerged chiefly within 19th-century Methodism, and to a lesser extent other traditions such as Quakerism and Anabaptism.

Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism

Credulity, Superstition and Fanaticism
In one of his prints, William Hogarth likewise attacked Methodists as "enthusiasts" full of "Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism".
It ridicules secular and religious credulity, and lampoons the exaggerated religious "enthusiasm" (excessive emotion, not keenness) of the Methodist movement.

Cell group

cell groupssmall groupclass meeting
Specifically Methodist means, such as the class meetings, provided his chief examples for these prudential means of grace.
In Methodism, they are known as class meetings and are a means of grace.

Outward holiness

HolinessHoliness Methodist standardsholiness standards
The doctrine is prevalent among denominations emerging during the revival movements, including the Lutheran Pietists and Methodists (especially those in the Holiness Movement), as well as Pentecostals.