Metis in the United States

MétisMetisMétis in the United StatesMétis AmericansMétis peopleMétis people (United States)Métis in the northern parts of the USUnited States.American Métis
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.wikipedia
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Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
The Métis in the U.S. are fewer in number than the neighboring Métis in Canada.
Canadian Métis represent the majority of people that identify as Métis, although there are a number of Métis in the United States.

Métis

Métis peopleMetisMetis people
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade. "Métis" is the French term for "mixed-blood".
The Métis have homelands and communities in the U.S., as well as in Canada, that have been separated by the drawing of the U.S.-Canada border at the 49th parallel North.

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians

Turtle Mountain ChippewaTurtle Mountain Band of ChippewaTurtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota
Many members of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians (a federally recognized Tribe) identify as Métis or Michif rather than as strictly Ojibwe.
The Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians (Ojibwe language: Mikinaakwajiw-ininiwag) is a Native American tribe of Ojibwa and Métis peoples, based on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota.

Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin

Marie BaldwinMarie Louise Bottineu Baldwin
Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952), was a Métis Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Attorney and Native American rights activist.

Northern Michigan

NorthernNorthern Lower Michigannorthern part
As late as 1829, the Métis were dominant in the economy of present-day Wisconsin and Northern Michigan.
Between 1795 and 1815 a system of Métis (descendants of indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish) fur trappers and traders) settlements and trading posts was established throughout Michigan, Wisconsin, and to a lesser extent in Illinois and Indiana.

North Dakota

NDNorthState of North Dakota
As of 2018, Métis people were living in Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Montana.
Historically, North Dakota was populated by the Mandan, Hidatsa, Lakota, and Ojibwe, and later by the Sanish and Métis.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
As of 2018, Métis people were living in Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Montana.
The state also has a small Métis population, and 1990 census data indicated that people from as many as 275 different tribes lived in Montana.

Josiah Francis (Hillis Hadjo)

Francis the ProphetJosiah FrancisHillis Hadjo
Francis was a métis, with a white father and Creek mother.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.

Alexander McGillivray

Alex McGillivrayChief Alexander McGillivray
Alexander's mother, Sehoy Marchand, was the daughter of Sehoy, a mixed-race Creek woman of the prestigious Wind Clan ("Hutalgalgi"), and of Jean Baptiste Louis DeCourtel Marchand, a French officer at Fort Toulouse.

Mixed-blood

mixed bloodmixed-race
"Métis" is the French term for "mixed-blood".

Half-Breed Tract

Half Breed TractDes Moines Half-Breed Reservationtract of land
A Half-Breed Tract was a segment of land designated in the western states by the United States government in the 19th century specifically for Métis of American Indian and European or European-American ancestry, at the time commonly known as half-breeds.

Solomon Juneau

Josette JuneauJuneau Town
In 1820, Juneau married Josette, the Métis daughter of Jacques Vieau, a fur trader who had built a trading post overlooking the Menomonee Valley years before, and his Menominee wife.

Territorial era of Minnesota

territorial era
A notable result of this trade network was the Métis people, a mixed-race community descended from Native Americans and French traders, as well as other mixed-race peoples.

Michif

Michif languagecrgFrench Cree
Michif is the name of creole language spoken by the Métis people of western Canada and adjacent areas of the United States, mostly a mix of Cree and Canadian French.
Michif (also Mitchif, Mechif, Michif-Cree, Métif, Métchif, French Cree) is the language of the Métis people of Canada and the United States, who are the descendants of First Nations women (mainly Cree, Nakota, and Ojibwe) and fur trade workers of European ancestry (mainly French and Scottish Canadians).

La Baye

Another major Métis settlement was La Baye, located at the present site of Green Bay, Wisconsin.
In 1816 La Baye had a population of about 40 families, who were virtually all Métis.

Mestizos in the United States

MestizoMestizo AmericansMestizos
This group does not include Métis people of the United States (usually with Anglo-Indigenous mixed ancestry) or Métis people of Canada (usually with Franco-Indigenous or Scottish-Indigenous mixed ancestry) residing in the US, nor does it include Tejanos, Nuevomexicanos, nor Multiracial Americans, whose ethnic identity is Native American or Latin American Indian.

Mestizo

Mestizosmestizamestizaje
The word is a cognate of the Spanish word mestizo and the Portuguese word mestiço.
In the United States, Métis Americans and Mestizo Americans are two distinct racial and ethno-racial identities, as reflected in the use of French and Spanish loanwords, respectively.

European Americans

European AmericanEuropean-AmericanEuropean
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.

French people

FrenchFrenchmanFrenchmen
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.

Scottish people

ScottishScotsScot
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmen
The Métis in the United States are a specific culture and community of Métis people, who descend from unions between Native American and early European colonist parents - usually Indigenous women who married French (and later Scottish, English ) men who worked as fur trappers and traders during the 18th and 19th centuries at the height of the fur trade.