Metropolis (1927 film)

Metropolis1927 film of the same namefilm of the same nameThe Complete MetropolisMariaMetropolis'' (1927 film)19271927 ''Metropolis1927 movie1927 silent movie
Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang.wikipedia
595 Related Articles

Science fiction film

science fictionsci-fiscience-fiction
Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang.
The next major example in the genre was the film Metropolis (1927).

Fritz Lang

LangFriedrich "Fritz" LangFriedrich Christian Anton Lang
Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang.
Lang's most famous films include the groundbreaking futuristic Metropolis (1927) and the also influential M (1931), a film noir precursor that he made before he moved to the United States.

Alfred Abel

Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.
His best-known performance was as Joh Fredersen in Fritz Lang's 1927 film, Metropolis.

Babelsberg Studio

Babelsberg StudiosStudio BabelsbergBabelsberg
Erich Pommer produced it in the Babelsberg Studios for Universum Film A.G. (UFA).
Hundreds of films, including Fritz Lang's Metropolis and Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel were filmed there.

Thea von Harbou

Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.
She is especially known as the screenwriter of the science fiction film classic Metropolis and the story on which it was based.

Rudolf Klein-Rogge

Rudolph Klein-Rogge
Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.
He is probably best known in popular culture, particularly to English-speaking audiences, for playing the archetypal mad scientist role of C. A. Rotwang in Lang's Metropolis and as the criminal genius Doctor Mabuse.

Brigitte Helm

Brigette Helm
Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.
Brigitte Helm (17 March 1906 – 11 June 1996) was a German actress, best remembered for her dual role as Maria and her double, the Maschinenmensch, in Fritz Lang's 1927 silent film Metropolis.

Erich Kettelhut

Critics found it pictorially beautiful and visually powerful—the film's art direction by Otto Hunte, Erich Kettelhut and Karl Vollbrecht draws influence from Bauhaus, Cubist and Futurist design, along with touches of the Gothic in the scenes in the catacombs, the cathedral and Rotwang's house —and lauded its complex special effects, but accused its story of naiveté.
Kettelhut is considered as one of the most important artists in the history of early German cinema, mainly for his set direction for Die Nibelungen (1924) and his design and visual effects for Metropolis (1927).

Erich Pommer

Eric PommerDas Cabinet des Erich PommerDecla-Bioscop
Erich Pommer produced it in the Babelsberg Studios for Universum Film A.G. (UFA).
As the head of production at Decla Film, Decla-Bioscop and from 1924 to 1926 at UFA Pommer was responsible for many of the best known movies of the Weimar Republic such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler (1922), Die Nibelungen (1924), Michael (1924), Der Letzte Mann / The Last Laugh (1924), Variety (1925), Tartuffe (1926), Manon Lescaut (1926) Faust (1926), Metropolis (1927) and The Blue Angel (1930).

Gustav Fröhlich

Gustav Froehlich
Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.
He landed secondary roles in a number of films and plays before landing his breakthrough role of Freder Fredersen in Fritz Lang's 1927 film Metropolis.

German Expressionism

German ExpressionistexpressionistGerman Expressionists
Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang.
Later films often categorized as part of the brief history of German Expressionism include Metropolis (1927) and M (1931), both directed by Fritz Lang.

Otto Hunte

Critics found it pictorially beautiful and visually powerful—the film's art direction by Otto Hunte, Erich Kettelhut and Karl Vollbrecht draws influence from Bauhaus, Cubist and Futurist design, along with touches of the Gothic in the scenes in the catacombs, the cathedral and Rotwang's house —and lauded its complex special effects, but accused its story of naiveté.
Hunte's architectural designs are found in many of the most important films of the period including Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen (1924), Metropolis (1927) and Der blaue Engel.

Rotwang

C. A. RotwangDr. Rotwang
Fredersen takes the maps to the inventor Rotwang to learn their meaning.
C. A. Rotwang is a fictional character in Fritz Lang's 1927 science fiction film Metropolis, as well as screenwriter Thea von Harbou's original novel Metropolis.

Silent film

silentsilent erasilent films
The silent film is regarded as a pioneering science-fiction movie, being among the first feature-length movies of that genre.
In 1984, an edited restoration of Metropolis (1927) was released with a new rock music score by producer-composer Giorgio Moroder.

Heinrich Gotho

He notably appeared in numerous movies by director Fritz Lang, among them Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922), Metropolis (1927) and M (1931).

Fritz Rasp

Fritz Rasp erzählt
He also portrayed the mysterious "Der Schmale" ("The Thin Man") in Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927).

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
The silent film is regarded as a pioneering science-fiction movie, being among the first feature-length movies of that genre.
1927's Metropolis, directed by Fritz Lang, is the first feature-length science fiction film.

UFA GmbH

UFAUniversum Film AGPrisma Film
Erich Pommer produced it in the Babelsberg Studios for Universum Film A.G. (UFA).
The resulting concentration on a few large German film companies, which came together to unite production, distribution and presentation under one UFA's managers made severe miscalculations with regard to two large-scale productions, Nibelungen and Metropolis in 1924-1926.

Dystopia

dystopiandystopicdystopian future
Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder, the wealthy son of the city master, and Maria, a saintly figure to the workers, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes in their city and bring the workers together with Joh Fredersen, the city master.
Dystopian political situations are depicted in novels such as We, Parable of the Sower, Darkness at Noon, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Brave New World, The Hunger Games, Divergent and Fahrenheit 451 and such films as Metropolis, Brazil, Battle Royale, FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions, Soylent Green, Logan's Run, and The Running Man.

Maschinenmensch

MariaMachine-ManMaria-robot
The Maschinenmensch – the robot built by Rotwang to resurrect his lost love Hel – was created by sculptor Walter Schulze-Mittendorff.
The Maschinenmensch (German for "robot" or literally "machine-person") is a fictional character in Fritz Lang's film Metropolis, played by German actress Brigitte Helm in both its robot form and human incarnation.

Loverboy

Matt FrenetteDoug JohnsonDoug Johnson (Loverboy)
In 1984 Italian music producer Giorgio Moroder released a truncated version with a soundtrack by rock artists including Freddie Mercury, Loverboy and Adam Ant.
Also in 1984, Loverboy recorded a song called "Destruction" which appeared on the 1984 soundtrack of a re-edited version of the film Metropolis (1927).

Eugen Schüfftan

Eugen SchufftanEugene ShufftanSchufftan
The effects expert Eugen Schüfftan created pioneering visual effects for Metropolis.
One of the first uses of the process was for Metropolis (1927), directed by Fritz Lang.

Miniature effect

miniaturesminiatureSlurpasaur
Among the effects used are miniatures of the city, a camera on a swing, and most notably, the Schüfftan process, in which mirrors are used to create the illusion that actors are occupying miniature sets.
Some of the most influential visual effects films of these early years such as Metropolis (1927), Citizen Kane (1941), Godzilla (1954) The Ten Commandments (1956).