Metropolitan Railway

MetropolitanMetropolitan and St John's Wood RailwayMetropolitan Railway CompanyHammersmith & City RailwayNorth Metropolitan RailwayRobert SelbieHammersmith extension railwayMetRMetropolitan RedSt. John’s Wood Extension line
The Metropolitan Railway (also known as the Met) was a passenger and goods railway that served London from 1863 to 1933, its main line heading north-west from the capital's financial heart in the City to what were to become the Middlesex suburbs.wikipedia
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Baker Street tube station

Baker StreetBaker Street stationBaker Street Underground station
The line was soon extended from both ends, and northwards via a branch from Baker Street. There were stations at Paddington (Bishop's Road) (now Paddington), Edgware Road, Baker Street, Portland Road (now Great Portland Street), Gower Street (now Euston Square), King's Cross (now King's Cross St Pancras), and Farringdon Street (now Farringdon).
It is one of the original stations of the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the world's first underground railway, opened in 1863.

London Underground

Undergroundtubetube station
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern.
The Underground has its origins in the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground passenger railway.

Metro-land

MetrolandAvengerlandGreater London
Unlike other railway companies in the London area, the Met developed land for housing, and after World War I promoted housing estates near the railway using the "Metro-land" brand.
Metro-land (or Metroland) is a name given to the suburban areas that were built to the north-west of London in the counties of Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Middlesex in the early part of the 20th century that were served by the Metropolitan Railway.

Circle line (London Underground)

CircleCircle lineInner Circle
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern. Southern branches, directly served, reached Hammersmith in 1864, Richmond in 1877 and the original completed the Inner Circle in 1884, but the most important routes were those north-west into Middlesex countryside, stimulating the development of new suburbs.
The first section became operational in 1863 when the Metropolitan Railway opened the world's first underground line between Paddington and with wooden carriages and steam locomotives.

Metropolitan line

Metropolitanrail
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern.
In 1863 the Metropolitan Railway began the world's first underground railway between Paddington and with wooden carriages and steam locomotives, but its most important route became the line north into the Middlesex countryside, where it stimulated the development of new suburbs.

Farringdon Road

Farringdon Street
The first section was built beneath the New Road using the "cut-and-cover" method between Paddington and King's Cross and in tunnel and cuttings beside Farringdon Road from King's Cross to near Smithfield, near the City.
Its construction also included the building of the world's first stretch of underground railway, a branch of the Metropolitan Railway that later became part of the London Underground running beneath Farringdon Road from into the City at.

Hammersmith & City line

Hammersmith & CityHammersmith & City RailwayHammersmith and City
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern.
In 1863, the Metropolitan Railway began the world's first underground railway service between and Farringdon with wooden carriages and steam locomotives.

Middlesex

County of MiddlesexMiddlesex, EnglandMiddlesex County
The Metropolitan Railway (also known as the Met) was a passenger and goods railway that served London from 1863 to 1933, its main line heading north-west from the capital's financial heart in the City to what were to become the Middlesex suburbs.
The line to Windsor through Middlesex was completed in 1848, and the railway to Potters Bar in 1850; and the Metropolitan and District Railways started a series of extensions into the county in 1878.

Jubilee line

JubileeFleet lineFleet
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern.
The Jubilee line's first section opened in 1932, when the Metropolitan Railway built a branch from its main line at Wembley Park to Stanmore.

District line

District '''DistrictDistrict Lines
Former Met tracks and stations are used by the London Underground's Metropolitan, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Jubilee and Victoria lines, and by Chiltern Railways and Great Northern.
The first line opened in December 1868, with services from South Kensington to Westminster; these were operated by the Metropolitan Railway using wooden carriages hauled by steam locomotives.

Sir John Fowler, 1st Baronet

John FowlerSir John FowlerJohn Folwer
A bill was published in November 1852 and in January 1853 the directors held their first meeting and appointed John Fowler as its engineer.
In the 1850s and 1860s, he was engineer for the world's first underground railway, London's Metropolitan Railway, built by the "cut-and-cover" method under city streets.

Charles Pearson

Pearson, Charles
Charles Pearson, Solicitor to the City, was a leading promoter of several schemes and in 1846 proposed a central railway station to be used by multiple railway companies.
The resulting Metropolitan Railway was the first underground railway in the world and led to the development of the extensive London Underground network and the rapid expansion of the capital.

London Paddington station

London PaddingtonPaddingtonPaddington station
By 1850 there were seven railway termini around the urban centre of London: London Bridge and Waterloo to the south, Shoreditch and Fenchurch Street to the east, Euston and King's Cross to the north, and Paddington to the west.
Paddington was first served by London Underground trains in 1863, as the original western terminus of the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground railway.

Hammersmith tube station (Circle and Hammersmith & City lines)

HammersmithHammersmith (Circle/Hammersmith & City)Hammersmith tube station
Southern branches, directly served, reached Hammersmith in 1864, Richmond in 1877 and the original completed the Inner Circle in 1884, but the most important routes were those north-west into Middlesex countryside, stimulating the development of new suburbs.
The present station is situated on Beadon Road and opened on 1 December 1868, replacing the original station slightly north of here which opened on 13 June 1864 when the Metropolitan Railway's extension was built from Paddington.

District Railway

Metropolitan District RailwayDistrictMetropolitan and District
The design proved so successful that eventually 120 were built to provide traction on the Metropolitan, the District Railway (in 1871) and all other 'cut and cover' underground lines.
The Metropolitan Railway operated all services until the District introduced its own trains in 1871.

London King's Cross railway station

London King's CrossKing's CrossKing's Cross station
By 1850 there were seven railway termini around the urban centre of London: London Bridge and Waterloo to the south, Shoreditch and Fenchurch Street to the east, Euston and King's Cross to the north, and Paddington to the west. Its first line connected the main-line railway termini at,, and King's Cross to the City.
In 1866, a connection was made via the Metropolitan Railway to the London, Chatham and Dover Railway at, with goods and passenger services to South London via.

Farringdon station

FarringdonFarringdon Streetstation of the same name
There were stations at Paddington (Bishop's Road) (now Paddington), Edgware Road, Baker Street, Portland Road (now Great Portland Street), Gower Street (now Euston Square), King's Cross (now King's Cross St Pancras), and Farringdon Street (now Farringdon).
It was opened in 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway, which was the world's first underground railway.

Richmond station (London)

RichmondRichmond stationRichmond railway station
Southern branches, directly served, reached Hammersmith in 1864, Richmond in 1877 and the original completed the Inner Circle in 1884, but the most important routes were those north-west into Middlesex countryside, stimulating the development of new suburbs. Between 1 October 1877 and 31 December 1906 some services on the H&CR were extended to Richmond over the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) via its station at Hammersmith (Grove Road).
On 1 October 1877, the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan line) restarted the former GWR service to Richmond via Grove Road station.

GWR Metropolitan Class

Metropolitan ClassGreat Western Railway Metropolitan ClassGWR Metropolitan class 2-4-0T
Initially the railway was worked by GWR broad-gauge Metropolitan Class steam locomotives and rolling stock.
The Great Western Railway Metropolitan Class 2-4-0T broad gauge steam locomotives with condensing apparatus were used for working trains on the Metropolitan Railway.

Underground Electric Railways Company of London

Underground GroupUnderground Electric Railways of LondonUERL
On 1 July 1933, the Met was amalgamated with the Underground Electric Railways Company of London and the capital's tramway and bus operators to form the London Passenger Transport Board.
Before its takeover, the DR had carried out some joint electrification experiments with the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the other sub-surface line with which the DR shared the Inner Circle.

Middle Circle

This became known as the Middle Circle and ran until January 1905; from 1 July 1900 trains terminated at Earl's Court.
The route was from the District Railway station at Mansion House to Earl's Court, then via the West London Railway to Latimer Road on to the Hammersmith & City Railway and then via the Metropolitan Railway to the City of London.

Wood Lane tube station (Metropolitan line)

Wood Lanestation of the same nameWood Lane Metropolitan station
Additional stations were opened at Westbourne Park (1866), Latimer Road (1868), Royal Oak (1871), Wood Lane (1908) and Goldhawk Road (1914).
It was opened in 1908 on the Hammersmith branch of the Metropolitan Railway (now the Hammersmith & City line), on the viaduct adjacent to the bridge over Wood Lane and close to a station of the same name but on the Central London Railway (now the Central line).

Moorgate station

MoorgateLondon MoorgateMoorgate Street
The extension to Aldersgate Street and Moorgate Street (now Barbican and Moorgate) had opened on 23 December 1865 and all four tracks were open on 1 March 1866.
The station was opened as Moorgate Street in 1865 by the Metropolitan Railway.

Harrow-on-the-Hill station

Harrow-on-the-HillHarrowHarrow on the Hill
Harrow was reached in 1880, and from 1897 having achieved the early patronage of the Duke of Buckingham and owners of Waddesdon Manor services extended for many years to, beyond Aylesbury, in Buckinghamshire, as the crow flies 46 mi from Baker Street, still further from the City of London beyond.
Had the governors of Harrow School not made objections during the planning stage it is possible that the Metropolitan Railway might have followed a different route taking it closer to the town centre on the hill.

Hammersmith (Grove Road) railway station

Hammersmith (Grove Road)Grove RoadHammersmith
Between 1 October 1877 and 31 December 1906 some services on the H&CR were extended to Richmond over the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) via its station at Hammersmith (Grove Road).
For much of its existence, the station was also served by the Metropolitan Railway (MR; the precursor to today's Metropolitan line) and the Great Western Railway (GWR).