Mexican Cession

cessioncededterritory acquiredterritory lost to the United StatesAmerican annexation of Mexican landannexationannexation of 525,000 square miles of Mexican territoryannexed Mexican territoriesannexed the northern half of Mexicoannexed what is now the Southwest U.S.
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.wikipedia
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Mexican–American War

Mexican-American WarMexican WarMexican American War
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.
The 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, forced onto the remnant Mexican government, ended the war and enforced the Mexican Cession of the northern territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo México to the United States.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.
Victory in the Mexican–American War resulted in the 1848 Mexican Cession of California and much of the present-day American Southwest.

Alta California

Mexican CaliforniaCaliforniaUpper California
Most of the area had been the Mexican territory of Alta California, while a southeastern strip on the Rio Grande had been part of Santa Fe de Nuevo México, most of whose area and population were east of the Rio Grande on land that had been claimed by the Republic of Texas since 1835, but never controlled or even approached aside from the Texan Santa Fe Expedition.
Most of the areas formerly composing Alta California were ceded to the United States in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the Mexican–American War in 1848.

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo1848 Treaty of Guadalupe HidalgoTreaty of Guadalupe
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.
In the United States, the 1.36 million km² (525,000 square miles) of the area between the Adams-Onis and Guadalupe Hidalgo boundaries outside the 1007935 km2 claimed by the Republic of Texas is known as the Mexican Cession.

Texas

TXTexanState of Texas
This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new state of Texas.
In return, for US$18,250,000, Mexico gave the U.S. undisputed control of Texas, ceded the Mexican Cession in 1848, most of which today is called the American Southwest, and Texas's borders were established at the Rio Grande.

Utah

UTState of UtahUtah, U.S.
Soon after the war started and long before negotiation of the new Mexico–United States border, the question of slavery in the territories to be acquired polarized the Northern and Southern United States in the bitterest sectional conflict up to this time, which lasted for a deadlock of four years during which the Second Party System broke up, Mormon pioneers settled Utah, the California Gold Rush settled California, and New Mexico under a federal military U.S government turned back Texas's attempt to assert control over territory Texas claimed as far west as the Rio Grande.
The entire Southwest became U.S. territory upon the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, February 2, 1848.

Compromise of 1850

compromise billCompromise Measures of 1850Crisis of 1850
Eventually the Compromise of 1850 preserved the Union, but only for another decade.
The Compromise of 1850 was a package of five separate bills passed by the United States Congress in September 1850 that defused a political confrontation between slave and free states on the status of territories acquired in the Mexican–American War.

Wilmot Proviso

Proviso
The Wilmot Proviso was an unsuccessful 1846 proposal in the United States Congress to ban slavery in territory acquired from Mexico in the Mexican–American War.

Santa Fe de Nuevo México

Nuevo MéxicoNew MexicoSanta Fe de Nuevo Mexico
Most of the area had been the Mexican territory of Alta California, while a southeastern strip on the Rio Grande had been part of Santa Fe de Nuevo México, most of whose area and population were east of the Rio Grande on land that had been claimed by the Republic of Texas since 1835, but never controlled or even approached aside from the Texan Santa Fe Expedition.
The U.S. Army under Stephen Kearny occupied the territory in 1846 during the Mexican–American War, a provisional government was established, and Mexico recognized its loss to the United States in 1848 with the Mexican Cession in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

David Wilmot

He is best known for being the prime sponsor and namesake of the Wilmot Proviso, a failed proposal to ban the expansion of slavery to western lands gained in the Mexican Cession.

All of Mexico Movement

annexation of all of Mexicoall ofall of Mexico
There was even an All of Mexico Movement proposing complete annexation of Mexico among Eastern Democrats, but opposed by Southerners like John C. Calhoun who wanted additional territory for their crops but not the large population of central Mexico.
The controversy was eventually ended by the Mexican Cession, which added the territories of Alta California and Nuevo México to the United States, both more sparsely populated than the rest of Mexico.

Daniel Webster

WebsterDan'l WebsterAmerican politician of the same name
The U.S. Senate approved the treaty, rejecting amendments from both Jefferson Davis to also annex most of northeastern Mexico and Daniel Webster not to take even Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo México.
Nonetheless, because Webster opposed the acquisition of Mexican territory (with the exception of San Francisco), he voted against the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, in which the United States acquired the Mexican Cession.

Zachary Taylor

TaylorPresident TaylorGeneral Zachary Taylor
Debate over the status of slavery in the Mexican Cession dominated the political agenda and led to threats of secession from Southerners.

Stephen A. Douglas

Stephen DouglasDouglasStephen Arnold Douglas
The United States defeated Mexico in the Mexican–American War and acquired the Mexican Cession in the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

State of Deseret

DeseretProvisional State of Deseretchurch governed civil affairs
The provisional state encompassed most of the territory that had been acquired from Mexico the previous year as the Mexican Cession.

Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
Months after the speech, the Senate ratified the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, in which Mexico ceded hundreds of thousands of square miles of territory known as the Mexican Cession.

Transcontinental railroad

transcontinentaltranscontinental railwaytranscontinental rail line
It quickly became apparent that the Mexican Cession did not include a feasible route for a transcontinental railroad connecting to a southern port.

Slave states and free states

slave statefree stateslave states
The admission of Texas (1845) and the acquisition of the vast new Mexican Cession territories (1848), after the Mexican–American War, created further North-South conflict.

Southwestern United States

American SouthwestSouthwestSouthwestern
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
The Mexican Cession is the region in the modern-day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 after the Mexican–American War.

Rio Grande

Río GrandeRío BravoRío Bravo del Norte
Most of the area had been the Mexican territory of Alta California, while a southeastern strip on the Rio Grande had been part of Santa Fe de Nuevo México, most of whose area and population were east of the Rio Grande on land that had been claimed by the Republic of Texas since 1835, but never controlled or even approached aside from the Texan Santa Fe Expedition. This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new state of Texas.

Republic of Texas

TexasTexas RepublicRepublic
Most of the area had been the Mexican territory of Alta California, while a southeastern strip on the Rio Grande had been part of Santa Fe de Nuevo México, most of whose area and population were east of the Rio Grande on land that had been claimed by the Republic of Texas since 1835, but never controlled or even approached aside from the Texan Santa Fe Expedition. This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new state of Texas.

Texas annexation

annexation of Texasannexationannexed Texas
This region had not been part of the areas east of the Rio Grande which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas annexation resolution two years earlier had not specified the southern and western boundary of the new state of Texas.

Louisiana Purchase

LouisianaLouisiana TerritorySale of Louisiana
The largest was the Louisiana Purchase, with some 827,000 sq.