Mexican cuisine in the United States

Mexican food in the United StatesUnited States
What many recognize as Mexican cuisine is the product of a storied fusion of cultures and flavors.wikipedia
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Mexican cuisine

MexicanMexican foodMexico
What many recognize as Mexican cuisine is the product of a storied fusion of cultures and flavors. Some of Mexican cuisine's entrance into the United States can in part be attributed to the United States' expansion into what was then Northern Mexico as a result of the Mexican-American War and its termination with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848.
Mexican food in the United States is based on the food of northern Mexico.

Latin American cuisine

Latin AmericanCentral American cuisineLatin America
Mexican-Americans in the United States have developed regional cuisines largely incorporating the ingredients and cooking styles of authentic Mexican cuisines.

Tortilla

tortillasflour or corn tortillaHistory of the tortilla
Culinary staples like tortillas, salsa, chips, chili, burritos, and tacos help to formulate many Americans' notions of Mexican food.

Salsa (sauce)

salsasalsaschile sauce
Culinary staples like tortillas, salsa, chips, chili, burritos, and tacos help to formulate many Americans' notions of Mexican food.

Chili con carne

chilichile verdechilis
Culinary staples like tortillas, salsa, chips, chili, burritos, and tacos help to formulate many Americans' notions of Mexican food.

Burrito

burritosCalifornia burritobean burrito
Culinary staples like tortillas, salsa, chips, chili, burritos, and tacos help to formulate many Americans' notions of Mexican food.

Taco

tacosfish tacofish tacos
Culinary staples like tortillas, salsa, chips, chili, burritos, and tacos help to formulate many Americans' notions of Mexican food.

Maize

cornZea mayscorn (maize)

Tomatillo

tomatillosPhysalis philadelphicaPhysalis ixocarpa
Native-grown vegetables included squash, tomatillo, tomato, cactus, and chile.

Tomato

tomatoesSolanum lycopersicumLycopersicon esculentum
Native-grown vegetables included squash, tomatillo, tomato, cactus, and chile.

Cactus

Cactaceaecacticactus family
Native-grown vegetables included squash, tomatillo, tomato, cactus, and chile.

Chili pepper

chilichillichili peppers
Native-grown vegetables included squash, tomatillo, tomato, cactus, and chile. Instead of further changing their cuisine to match that of Spain, patriotism in the new country led Mexicans to embrace their history of spicy foods, using chile as an integral part of many dishes.

Tamale

Masa

masa harinacorn flourcorn dough

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
Spanish conquistadors hoped to find foods in the New World similar to those they were familiar with from Spain.

New World

NewThe New WorldAmericas
Spanish conquistadors hoped to find foods in the New World similar to those they were familiar with from Spain.

Aztecs

AztecAztec EmpireMexica
Aztec cuisine proved to be quite different, and the staple crops had not been developed sufficiently to support the livestock and populations the Spaniards hoped to establish.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish colonies
The Spanish introduced wheat to the natives, who used it to make flour tortillas.

European cuisine

EuropeanWesternWestern cuisine
It took time for natives to acclimate to these European tastes, but over time, cultural blending did occur.

Mexican Revolution

RevolutionrevolutionaryMexican Civil War
This served as a contrast between Mexican cuisine at the time of the Mexican Revolution.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
Instead of further changing their cuisine to match that of Spain, patriotism in the new country led Mexicans to embrace their history of spicy foods, using chile as an integral part of many dishes.

Texas

TXTexanState of Texas
American soldiers first came in contact with Mexican flavors during military endeavors in Texas throughout the 19th century, and some reports indicate that a handful of Mexican staple foods were further popularized during the 1893 World's Colombian Exposition in Chicago.

World's Columbian Exposition

Chicago World's FairColumbian ExpositionWorld Columbian Exposition
American soldiers first came in contact with Mexican flavors during military endeavors in Texas throughout the 19th century, and some reports indicate that a handful of Mexican staple foods were further popularized during the 1893 World's Colombian Exposition in Chicago.

United States territorial acquisitions

Westward Expansionwestward expansion of the United Statesexpanded westward
Some of Mexican cuisine's entrance into the United States can in part be attributed to the United States' expansion into what was then Northern Mexico as a result of the Mexican-American War and its termination with the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848.