Mexico

Depiction of the founding myth of Mexico-Tenochtitlan from the Codex Mendoza. The eagle perched on a cactus has been incorporated into the Mexican flag since its independence, and was a motif in colonial-era art.
View of the Pyramid of the Sun of Teotihuacan with first human establishment in the area dating back to 600 BCE
Cultivation of maize, shown in the Florentine Codex (1576) drawn by an indigenous scribe, with text in Nahuatl on this folio
1945 mural by Diego Rivera depicting the view from the Tlatelolco markets into Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the largest city in the Americas at the time
Hernán Cortés and his multilingual cultural translator, Doña Marina ("Malinche"), meeting Moctezuma II from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala, a document created ca. 1550 by the Tlaxcalans to remind the Spanish of their loyalty and the importance of Tlaxcala during the conquest of the Aztec Empire.
Smallpox depicted by an indigenous artist in the 1576 Florentine Codex
View of the Plaza Mayor (today Zócalo) in Mexico City (ca. 1695) by Cristóbal de Villalpando
New Spain was essential to the Spanish global trading system. White represents the route of the Spanish Manila Galleons in the Pacific and the Spanish convoys in the Atlantic. (Blue represents Portuguese routes.)
Silver peso mined and minted in colonial Mexico, which became a global currency
Viceroyalty of New Spain following the signing of the 1819 Adams-Onís Treaty
Luis de Mena, Virgin of Guadalupe and castas, showing race mixture and hierarchy as well as fruits of the realm, ca. 1750
Father Hidalgo used this banner of the Virgin of Guadalupe as their emblem
Siege of the Alhondiga de Granaditas, Guanajuato, 28 Sept. 1810.
Flag of the Army of the Three Guarantees, the force formed by ex-royalist Iturbide and insurgent Vicente Guerrero in February 1821
Flag of the First Mexican Empire under Agustín I, 1822-23, with the eagle wearing a crown
Flag of the First Republic of Mexico, with the eagle without a crown, signaling the new republic
General Antonio López de Santa Anna
Portrait of Liberal President Benito Juárez
The Execution of Emperor Maximilian, 19 June 1867. Gen. Tomás Mejía, left, Maximiian, center, Gen. Miguel Miramón, right. Painting by Édouard Manet 1868.
President Porfirio Díaz linking himself to independence hero Hidalgo and liberal hero Juárez September 1910.
Francisco I. Madero, who challenged Díaz in the fraudulent 1910 election and was elected president when Díaz was forced to resign in May 1911.
Revolutionary Generals Pancho Villa (left) and Emiliano Zapata (right)
General Álvaro Obregón (far left) shown with a cigar in his left hand and his right arm missing, center with the white beard is First Chief Venustiano Carranza
Logo of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, which incorporates the colors of the Mexican flag
Pemex, the national oil company created in 1938 for reasons of economic nationalism; it continues to provide major revenues for the government
NAFTA signing ceremony, October 1992. From left to right: (standing) President Carlos Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), President George H. W. Bush (U.S.), and Prime Minister Brian Mulroney (Canada)
Zapatista leader Comandanta Ramona
Vicente Fox and his opposition National Action Party won the 2000 general election, ending one-party rule.
Topographic map of Mexico
Mexico map of Köppen climate classification
Mexican wolf
Gray whale
The National Palace on the east side of Plaza de la Constitución or Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City; it was the residence of viceroys and Presidents of Mexico and now the seat of the Mexican government.
Andrés Manuel López Obrador President of Mexico
Alfonso García Robles diplomat who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1982
A Mexican Navy Eurocopter
Demonstration on 26 September 2015, in the first anniversary of the disappearance of the 43 students in the Mexican town of Iguala
The territorial evolution of Mexico after independence: secession of Central America (purple), Chiapas annexed from Guatemala (blue), losses to the U.S. (red, white and orange) and the reannexation of the Republic of Yucatán (red)
A proportional representation of Mexico's exports. The country has the most complex economy in Latin America.
Historical GDP per capita development of Mexico
Mexican Stock Exchange building
Telmex Tower, Mexico City.
The Central Eólica Sureste I, Fase II in Oaxaca. The Isthmus of Tehuantepec is the region of Mexico with the highest capacity for wind energy. (see Tehuantepecer, a strong wind that affects the region)
Guillermo Haro Observatory in Cananea, Sonora.
Cancun and the Riviera Maya is the most visited region in Latin America
The Baluarte Bridge is the highest cable-stayed bridge in the world, the fifth-highest bridge overall and the highest bridge in the Americas.
El Cajon Dam
Mexican states by population density
Las castas. Casta painting showing 16 racial groupings. Anonymous, 18th century, oil on canvas, 148×104 cm, Museo Nacional del Virreinato, Tepotzotlán, Mexico.
Colonial caste painting of Mexican family in Viceroyalty of New Spain
Octavio Paz was awarded the 1981 Miguel de Cervantes Prize, the 1982 Neustadt International Prize for Literature, and the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature.
Our Lady of Guadalupe, patron saint of Mexico. This painting of her at the Basilica of Guadalupe is among her most notable depictions. Scientists debate if it should be dated 1531, the year of the first apparition was said to appear, or the 1550s.
Cathedral of Zacatecas
General Hospital of Mexico in Mexico City.
Central Library of the National Autonomous University of Mexico
Olga Sánchez Cordero, Minister of the Interior (Gobernacion) in President López Obrador's cabinet
Palacio de Bellas Artes (Palace of Fine Arts), with murals, other artwork, and a major performance space
Mexican Muralism. A cultural expression starting in the 1920s created by a group of Mexican painters after the Mexican Revolution.
Monument to Cuauhtémoc, Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City (1887)
Teotihuacán, State of Mexico
The colonial-era Cathedral Mexico City dominates one side of the main square of the capital
Museo Soumaya in Mexico City building
David Alfaro Siqueiros by Héctor García Cobo at Lecumberri prison, Mexico City, 1960.
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, "The Tenth Muse." Posthmous portrait Juan Cabrera
Actress Dolores del Río, Hollywood star in the 1920s and 1930s and prominent figure of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema in the 1940s and 1950s
Mole sauce, which has dozens of varieties across the Republic, is seen as a symbol of Mexicanidad and is considered Mexico's national dish.
Portrait of composer Carlos Chávez by Carl van Vechten
Azteca Stadium, Mexico City.
Logo for the 1968 Mexico Olympics
Plaque in Mexico City commemorating Lucha libre as an intangible cultural heritage
View of the Pyramid of the Sun of Teotihuacan, the first human establishment in the area dating back to 600 BCE
Temple of Kukulcán (El Castillo) in the maya city of Chichen Itza
Storming of the Teocalli by Cortez and his Troops (1848)
New Spain was essential to the Spanish global trading system. White represents the route of the Spanish Manila Galleons in the Pacific and the Spanish convoys in the Atlantic. (Blue represents Portuguese routes.)
Map of the First Mexican Empire
Students in a burned bus during the protests of 1968
Pico de Orizaba, the highest mountain in Mexico
Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the Congress of Mexico
Andrés Manuel López Obrador President of Mexico
Headquarters of the Secretariat of Foreign Affairs
Mexican Federal Police celebration.
Mexico City, the financial center of Mexico
Mexican Stock Exchange building
Large Millimeter Telescope in Puebla.
The Baluarte Bridge is the highest cable-stayed bridge in the world, the fifth-highest bridge overall and the highest bridge in the Americas.
Lake Chapala is Mexico's largest freshwater lake.
Regional variation of ancestry according to a study made by Ruiz-Linares in 2014, each dot represents a volunteer, with most coming from south Mexico and Mexico City.
Map for the year 2000 of the indigenous languages of Mexico having more than 100,000 speakers.
Mexico–United States barrier between San Diego's border patrol offices in California, USA (left) and Tijuana, Mexico (right)
Secretary of Health, Mexico City, Mexico.
Central Library of the National Autonomous University of Mexico
Frida Kahlo, the most famous woman artist in Mexican history.
Palacio de Bellas Artes (Palace of Fine Arts), with murals, other artwork, and a major performance space
Octavio Paz was awarded the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature
Azteca Stadium, Mexico City.
El Santo, one of the most famous and iconic Mexican luchadores

Country in the southern portion of North America.

- Mexico

358 related topics

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North American Free Trade Agreement

NAFTA GDP – 2012 : IMF – World Economic Outlook Databases (Oct 2013)
Back row, left to right: Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, U.S. President George H. W. Bush, and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, at the initialing of the draft North American Free Trade Agreement in October 1992. In front are Mexican Secretary of Commerce and Industrial Development Jaime Serra Puche, United States Trade Representative Carla Hills, and Canadian Minister of International Trade Michael Wilson.
Obama, Peña Nieto and Harper at the IX North American Leaders' Summit (informally known as the Three Amigos Summit) in Toluca
Former President Enrique Peña Nieto with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and then-President Barack Obama of the United States at the 2016 North American Leaders' Summit
Chrystia Freeland, Luis Videgaray Caso and Rex Tillerson in Mexico City in 2018

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA ; Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte, TLCAN; Accord de libre-échange nord-américain, ALÉNA) was an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States that created a trilateral trade bloc in North America.

Conquest of Mexico by Cortés, oil on canvas Conquista de México por Cortés

Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire

One of the primary events in the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

One of the primary events in the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

Conquest of Mexico by Cortés, oil on canvas Conquista de México por Cortés
Cortés and his counselor, the Nahua woman La Malinche, meet Moctezuma in Tenochtitlan, 8 November 1519
The death of Moctezuma, depicted in the Florentine Codex
Smallpox depicted in Book XII on the conquest of Mexico in the Florentine Codex
The capture of Cuauhtemoc. 17th century, oil on canvas.
Bernal Díaz del Castillo's True History of the Conquest of Mexico
Tlaxcalan allies of the Spanish, showing their leaders, porters, as well as a Spanish warrior and a Spanish war dog. Lienzo de Tlaxcala
A comet seen by Moctezuma, interpreted as a sign of impending peril. Diego Durán's account from indigenous informants.
Aztec empire on the eve of the Spanish Invasion
Diego de Velázquez, who commissioned Cortés's limited expedition of exploration in 1519
Hernán Cortés in his later years; his coat of arms on the upper left corner. Painting reproduced in the book America (R. Cronau 19th century).
Map depicting Cortés' conquest route
Codex Azcatitlan depicting the Spanish-Tlaxcalan army, with Cortés and La Malinche, along with an African slave in front the meeting with Moctezuma. The facing page is no longer extant.
Coat of arms of Villa Rica, Veracruz; the first town council founded by the Spanish. The tile mosaic is located in Mexico City.
Cortés scuttling fleet off Veracruz coast
Meeting of Cortés and Xicotencatl
The massacre of Cholula. Lienzo de Tlaxcala
Cholula Massacre, by Felix Parra, 1877.
Map of the Valley of Mexico on the eve of the Spanish conquest
"Motecuhzuma receives Cortés. Mexican dances in the lake." by Juan González and Miguel González. 1698
Conquistadors and their Tlaxcalan allies enter Tenochtitlan
La Noche Triste depicted in the 17th century
A page from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala, depicting the battle of Otumba
"The Last Days of Tenochtitlan, Conquest of Mexico by Cortez", a 19th-century painting by William de Leftwich Dodge.
Hernan Cortés fight with two Aztecs.
Nuño de Guzmán, a rival of Cortés, led Spanish soldiers with Tlaxcalan allies in the conquest of Michoacan.
Pedro de Alvarado's death in 1541, depicted in the indigenous Codex Telleriano-Remensis. The glyph to the right of his head represents his Nahuatl name, Tonatiuh ("Sun").
Evangelization of Mexico
Scene from the opera La Conquista, 2005

The fall of the Aztec Empire was the key event in the formation of the Spanish Empire overseas, with New Spain, which later became Mexico.

2000 Mexican general election

Fox campaign items.
Cárdenas and Fox campaign buttons.
Labastida campaign buttons.
Fox campaign watches.
Fox campaign bottles
Camacho Solís and Bartlett (as PRI presidential pre-candidate) campaign buttons.

General elections were held in Mexico on Sunday, 2 July 2000.

Chiapas

Jaguar sculpture from Cintalapa dating between 1000 and 400 BCE on display at the Regional Museum of Anthropology and History of Chiapas.
The Palace at Palenque
The Royal Crown centered in the main plaza of Chiapa de Corzo built in 1562.
Remnants of frescos at the Saint Mark Cathedral of Tuxtla Gutiérrez
Comitán's declaration of independence from 1823
Copy of the 1825 state constitution
1856 map of the state
The Palace of Government of Chiapas (Governor's Office) at Tuxtla Gutiérrez
Palacio Legislativo (Legislative Palace) at Tuxtla Gutiérrez.
Sugar cane mill from Tapachula on display at the Regional Museum in Chiapas
Area of the Lacandon Jungle burned to plant crops
Zapatistas Territory sign in Chiapas, Mexico
Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) graffiti in Chiapas, Mexico
An EZLN mural in Chiapas, Mexico depicting a story about Compañero José written in Spanish and Mayan
Mount Tacaná
View of the Sumidero Canyon from atop the ridge
Lake at the Parque Nacional Lagunas de Montebello
Jungle area near Group C at the Palenque archeological site
Miramar Lake surrounded by the Lacandon Jungle
View of Sierra Madre de Chiapas from the Soconusco Region
View of the waterfalls at Agua Azul
Usumacinta River and Lacandon Jungle on the Chiapas side
Grijalva River flowing through the central region
Overlooking part of the Malpaso or Nezahualcoyotl Reservoir
Tzeltal woman in Palenque
Ranch near Palenque
Boats at the docks of Frontera Corozal, which mostly serves the nearby Yaxchilan archeological site
Misol-Há Waterfall
Drink called taxcalate
Cristo de Chiapas, a monumental cross in Tuxtla Gutiérrez constructed in 2011
Subcomandante Marcos of the Zapatistas entered into an alliance with Chiapas Muslims in the 1990s.
Olmec style stone sculpture from Tiltepec at the Regional Museum of Chiapas
View of Port Chiapas
Ángel Albino Corzo International Airport

Chiapas (Tzotzil and Tzeltal: Chyapas ), officially the Free and Sovereign State of Chiapas (Estado Libre y Soberano de Chiapas), is one of the states that make up the 32 federal entities of Mexico.

National Action Party (Mexico)

Manuel Gómez Morín, founder of the PAN in 1939
Acción Juvenil official logo
Vicente Fox, first PANista to be elected president of Mexico (2000-06), ended more than 70 years of PRI rule.
Felipe Calderón, President of Mexico (2006-12)
States governments by PAN (2020)
Diego Fernandez de Cevallos
Luis Felipe Bravo

The National Action Party (Partido Acción Nacional, PAN) is a conservative political party in Mexico founded in 1939.

The languages of Spain

Hispanophone

Hispanophone and Hispanic refers to anything relating to the Spanish language (the Hispanosphere).

Hispanophone and Hispanic refers to anything relating to the Spanish language (the Hispanosphere).

The languages of Spain

In the same year Francisco Vásquez de Coronado led 2,000 Spaniards and Mexican Indians across today's Arizona–Mexico border and traveled as far as central Kansas, close to the exact geographic center of what is now the continental United States.

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List of World Heritage Sites in Mexico

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of importance to cultural or natural heritage as described in the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, established in 1972.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Sites are places of importance to cultural or natural heritage as described in the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, established in 1972.

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Mexico accepted the convention on 23 February 1984, making its historical sites eligible for inclusion on the list.

Share of population in extreme poverty over time

Poverty in Mexico

Share of population in extreme poverty over time
Marginalized settlement "Colinas del Río", in the municipality Benito Juárez, Nuevo León, 2005.
Poverty In The Streets
Differences in national income equality around the world as measured by the national Gini coefficient. A higher number means a higher income inequality
GDP by State in US Dollars (2008)

Poverty in Mexico deals with the incidence of poverty in Mexico and its measurement.

First anniversary protest of the Narvarte murder case, Mexico City, July 31, 2016

Crime in Mexico

First anniversary protest of the Narvarte murder case, Mexico City, July 31, 2016
Drug-war related murders in Mexico, 2006–2011.
Bricks of cocaine, a form in which it is commonly transported.
The mass kidnapping of the 43 students in Iguala on September 26, 2014 triggered a nationwide protest
Poster denouncing the forced disappearance of Felix Barrientos Campos, arrested on July 5, 1975 in Acapulco (Guerrero, Mexico) and whose whereabouts are unknown until the date of the poster's placement in 2010. The announcement was placed in the Alameda Central of Mexico City.
Demonstration against the murder of Javier Valdez Cárdenas in May 2017
Mexico's disappeared people
2007 protest by some victims' families demanding punishment of the killers
Police on the street in the high crime area of Iztapalapa, Mexico City.
TDR-EP guerrillas during a revolutionary meeting. See Terrorism in Mexico
Armed police at the Zócalo, Mexico City.
2011 Mexican protests against cartel violence and government disregard

Crime is one of the most urgent concerns facing Mexico, as Mexican drug trafficking rings play a major role in the flow of cocaine, methamphetamine, fentanyl, heroin, and marijuana transiting between Latin America and the United States.

The 17 countries identified as megadiverse by Conservation International

Megadiverse countries

The term megadiverse country refers to any one of a group of nations that harbor the majority of Earth's species and high numbers of endemic species.

The term megadiverse country refers to any one of a group of nations that harbor the majority of Earth's species and high numbers of endemic species.

The 17 countries identified as megadiverse by Conservation International
The 20 current like-minded megadiverse countries

In 2002, Mexico formed a separate organization focusing on Like-Minded Megadiverse Countries, consisting of countries rich in biological diversity and associated traditional knowledge.