Michael Faraday

FaradayFaraday, MichaelM. FaradaySir Michael FaradayFaraday LecturesFaraday's ringFaradicProfessor Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday FRS (22 September 1791 – 25 August 1867) was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.wikipedia
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Fellow of the Royal Society

FRSForMemRSFellows of the Royal Society
Michael Faraday FRS (22 September 1791 – 25 August 1867) was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.
Fellowship of the Society, the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence, is a significant honour which has been awarded to many eminent scientists from history including Isaac Newton (1672), Charles Darwin (1839), Michael Faraday (1824), Ernest Rutherford (1903), Srinivasa Ramanujan (1918), Albert Einstein (1921), Winston Churchill (1941), Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (1944), Dorothy Hodgkin (1947), Alan Turing (1951) and Francis Crick (1959).

Electromagnetic induction

inductionmagnetic inductioninduced
His main discoveries include the principles underlying electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.
Michael Faraday is generally credited with the discovery of induction in 1831, and James Clerk Maxwell mathematically described it as Faraday's law of induction.

Electrolysis

electrolyticelectrolyzedelectrolyzer
His main discoveries include the principles underlying electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.
The word "electrolysis" was introduced by Michael Faraday in the 19th century, on the suggestion of the Rev. William Whewell, using the Greek words ἤλεκτρον "amber", which since the 17th century was associated with electric phenomena, and λύσις meaning "dissolution".

Benzene

benzene ringbenzolbenzene rings
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
Michael Faraday first isolated and identified benzene in 1825 from the oily residue derived from the production of illuminating gas, giving it the name bicarburet of hydrogen.

Diamagnetism

diamagneticdiamagnetLandau diamagnetism
His main discoveries include the principles underlying electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.
In 1845, Michael Faraday demonstrated that it was a property of matter and concluded that every material responded (in either a diamagnetic or paramagnetic way) to an applied magnetic field.

Faraday's laws of electrolysis

Faraday's law of electrolysislaws of electrolysisFaraday's law
He similarly discovered the principles of electromagnetic induction and diamagnetism, and the laws of electrolysis.
Faraday's laws of electrolysis are quantitative relationships based on the electrochemical research published by Michael Faraday in 1834.

Electrode

electrodescathodemicroelectrode
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
The word was coined by William Whewell at the request of the scientist Michael Faraday from two Greek words: elektron, meaning amber (from which the word electricity is derived), and hodos, a way.

Ernest Rutherford

RutherfordLord RutherfordSir Ernest Rutherford
Physicist Ernest Rutherford stated, "When we consider the magnitude and extent of his discoveries and their influence on the progress of science and of industry, there is no honour too great to pay to the memory of Faraday, one of the greatest scientific discoverers of all time."
Encyclopædia Britannica considers him to be the greatest experimentalist since Michael Faraday (1791–1867).

Electrochemistry

electrochemicalelectrochemistelectrochemical reaction
Michael Faraday FRS (22 September 1791 – 25 August 1867) was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.
In 1832, Michael Faraday's experiments led him to state his two laws of electrochemistry.

Ion

cationanionions
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
This term was introduced (after a suggestion by William Whewell ) by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday in 1834 for the then-unknown species that goes from one electrode to the other through an aqueous medium.

Electric motor

motorelectric motorsmotors
His inventions of electromagnetic rotary devices formed the foundation of electric motor technology, and it was largely due to his efforts that electricity became practical for use in technology.
The first demonstration of the effect with a rotary motion was given by Michael Faraday in 1821.

Farad

microfaradFpF
The SI unit of capacitance is named in his honour: the farad.
It is named after the English physicist Michael Faraday.

Electromagnetic field

electromagnetic fieldselectromagneticEMF
It was by his research on the magnetic field around a conductor carrying a direct current that Faraday established the basis for the concept of the electromagnetic field in physics.
In 1831, Michael Faraday made the seminal observation that time-varying magnetic fields could induce electric currents and then, in 1864, James Clerk Maxwell published his famous paper A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field.

Electricity

electricalelectricelectrically
His inventions of electromagnetic rotary devices formed the foundation of electric motor technology, and it was largely due to his efforts that electricity became practical for use in technology.
Michael Faraday invented the electric motor in 1821, and Georg Ohm mathematically analysed the electrical circuit in 1827.

Magnetism

magneticmagneticsmagnetic properties
Faraday also established that magnetism could affect rays of light and that there was an underlying relationship between the two phenomena.
Several other experiments followed, with André-Marie Ampère, who in 1820 discovered that the magnetic field circulating in a closed-path was related to the current flowing through the perimeter of the path; Carl Friedrich Gauss; Jean-Baptiste Biot and Félix Savart, both of whom in 1820 came up with the Biot–Savart law giving an equation for the magnetic field from a current-carrying wire; Michael Faraday, who in 1831 found that a time-varying magnetic flux through a loop of wire induced a voltage, and others finding further links between magnetism and electricity.

Capacitance

capacitiveself-capacitanceelectrical capacitance
The SI unit of capacitance is named in his honour: the farad.
The SI unit of capacitance is the farad (symbol: F), named after the English physicist Michael Faraday.

Electromagnetism

electromagneticelectrodynamicselectromagnetic force
Michael Faraday FRS (22 September 1791 – 25 August 1867) was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.
This unification, which was observed by Michael Faraday, extended by James Clerk Maxwell, and partially reformulated by Oliver Heaviside and Heinrich Hertz, is one of the key accomplishments of 19th-century mathematical physics.

Bunsen burner

Bunsen burnersBunsenBunsen flame
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
Similar principles had been used in an earlier burner design by Michael Faraday, as well as in a device patented in 1856 by the gas engineer R. W. Elsner.

Cathode

cathodiccopper cathode Indirectly Heated Cathode
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
The word was coined in 1834 from the Greek κάθοδος (kathodos), 'descent' or 'way down', by William Whewell, who had been consulted by Michael Faraday over some new names needed to complete a paper on the recently discovered process of electrolysis.

Humphry Davy

Sir Humphry DavyDavySir Humphry Davy, Bt
In 1812, at the age of 20 and at the end of his apprenticeship, Faraday attended lectures by the eminent English chemist Humphry Davy of the Royal Institution and the Royal Society, and John Tatum, founder of the City Philosophical Society.
He joked that his assistant Michael Faraday was his greatest discovery.

Fullerian Professor of Chemistry

Fullerian Professor of PhysiologyFullerian Professor of Physiology and Comparative AnatomyFullerian Professorship of Chemistry
Faraday ultimately became the first and foremost Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution, a lifetime position.

Anode

anodicanodes(anode)
As a chemist, Faraday discovered benzene, investigated the clathrate hydrate of chlorine, invented an early form of the Bunsen burner and the system of oxidation numbers, and popularised terminology such as "anode", "cathode", "electrode" and "ion".
The word was coined in 1834 from the Greek ἄνοδος (anodos), 'ascent', by William Whewell, who had been consulted by Michael Faraday over some new names needed to complete a paper on the recently discovered process of electrolysis.

Newington Butts

Newington Butts theatre
Michael Faraday was born on 22 September 1791 in Newington Butts, which is now part of the London Borough of Southwark but was then a suburban part of Surrey.
Michael Faraday was born in Newington Butts.

Tetrachloroethylene

perchloroethylenetetrachloroethenePCE
In 1820 Faraday reported the first synthesis of compounds made from carbon and chlorine, C 2 Cl 6 and C 2 Cl 4, and published his results the following year.
Michael Faraday first synthesized tetrachloroethylene in 1821 by thermal decomposition of hexachloroethane.

Chlorine

Clchlorine gaschlorinated
Faraday was specifically involved in the study of chlorine; he discovered two new compounds of chlorine and carbon.
In 1823, Michael Faraday liquefied chlorine for the first time, and demonstrated that what was then known as "solid chlorine" had a structure of chlorine hydrate (Cl 2 ·H 2 O).