Michael Foot

The Right Honourable '''Michael FootFootFoot, MichaelMichaelMichael Mackintosh FootThe Rt Hon Michael Foot
Michael Mackintosh Foot (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010), was a British Labour Party politician who served as Labour Leader from 1980 to 1983.wikipedia
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1945 United Kingdom general election

1945 general election19451945 election
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992. Foot fought the Plymouth Devonport constituency in the 1945 general election.
Future prominent figures who entered Parliament included Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot and Hugh Gaitskell.

1992 United Kingdom general election

1992 general election19921992 election
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992.
Former Conservative Leader and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, Former Labour Party Leader Michael Foot, John Maples, Francis Maude, Rosie Barnes and Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams left Parliament as a result of this election, though Maples, Maude, and Adams returned at the next election.

1960 Ebbw Vale by-election

1960 by-election19601960 (by-election),
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992.
The selection of Michael Foot, a prominent leftwinger out of sympathy with the party leadership on nuclear disarmament and other issues, led to a lively campaign.

1955 United Kingdom general election

1955 general election19551955 election
Foot served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and again from 1960 until he retired in 1992.
Future Labour leader Michael Foot lost his seat of Plymouth Devonport at this election; he returned for Ebbw Vale in a 1960 by-election.

1983 United Kingdom general election

1983 general election19831983 election
Foot led Labour into the 1983 general election, when the party obtained its lowest share of the vote since the 1918 general election and the fewest parliamentary seats it had had at any time since before 1945.
The Labour Party had been led by Michael Foot since the resignation of former Prime Minister James Callaghan in 1980.

1983 Labour Party leadership election (UK)

2 October 198319831983 leadership election
Elected as a compromise candidate, Foot served as the Leader of the Labour Party, and Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983.
It occurred when former leader Michael Foot resigned after winning only 209 seats at the 1983 general election, a loss of 60 seats compared to their performance at the previous election four years earlier.

Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament

CNDCampaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND)CND symbol
A passionate orator, and associated with the left-wing of the Labour Party for most of his career, Foot was an ardent supporter of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and of British withdrawal from the European Economic Community (EEC).
The other members of its executive committee were Martin, Priestley, Ritchie Calder, journalist James Cameron, Howard Davies, Michael Foot, Arthur Goss, and Joseph Rotblat.

Paul Foot (journalist)

Paul FootFoot, PaulPaul
He was the uncle of campaigning journalist Paul Foot (1937–2004) and charity worker Oliver Foot (1946–2008).
He was a nephew of Michael Foot, later leader of the Labour Party, with whom the younger Foot was close.

1980 Labour Party leadership election (UK)

elected10 November 19801980 leadership election
Elected as a compromise candidate, Foot served as the Leader of the Labour Party, and Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983.
Callaghan had been Prime Minister from 1976 to 1979 and had stayed on as leader of the Labour Party for eighteen months in order to oversee an orderly transition to his favoured successor, Denis Healey over his own deputy Michael Foot.

Neil Kinnock

Lord KinnockKinnockBaron Kinnock
He resigned the party leadership after the election, and was succeeded as leader by Neil Kinnock.
He remained as Education spokesman following the resignation of Callaghan as Leader of the Labour Party and the election of Michael Foot as his successor in late 1980.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
Michael Mackintosh Foot (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010), was a British Labour Party politician who served as Labour Leader from 1980 to 1983.
The election of Michael Foot as leader in 1980, and the leftist policies he espoused, such as unilateral nuclear disarmament, leaving the European Economic Community and NATO, closer governmental influence in the banking system, the creation of a national minimum wage and a ban on fox hunting led in 1981 to four former cabinet ministers from the right of the Labour Party (Shirley Williams, William Rodgers, Roy Jenkins and David Owen) forming the Social Democratic Party.

Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon

Hugh FootLord CaradonHugh Mackintosh Foot
Michael Foot's siblings included: Sir Dingle Foot MP (1905–78), a Liberal and subsequently Labour MP; Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon (1907–90), Governor of Cyprus (1957–60) and representative of the United Kingdom at the United Nations from 1964–70; Liberal politician John Foot, later Baron Foot (1909–99); Margaret Elizabeth Foot (1911–65); Jennifer Mackintosh Highet (born 1916); and Christopher Isaac Foot (1917–84).
His three politically active brothers, Dingle, John and Michael, were all educated at Oxford and all became Presidents of the Oxford Union.

Oliver Foot

Oliver Isaac Foot
He was the uncle of campaigning journalist Paul Foot (1937–2004) and charity worker Oliver Foot (1946–2008).
He was the younger brother of journalist Paul Foot and nephew of the former leader of the British Labour Party, Michael Foot, Labour government minister Sir Dingle Foot and Liberal Peer Lord John Foot.

Guilty Men

He co-wrote the classic 1940 polemic against appeasement of Adolf Hitler, Guilty Men, under a pseudonym.
Guilty Men was written by three journalists: Michael Foot (a future Leader of the Labour Party), Frank Owen (a former Liberal MP), and Peter Howard (a Conservative).

Plymouth Devonport (UK Parliament constituency)

Plymouth DevonportDevonportPlymouth, Devonport
Foot fought the Plymouth Devonport constituency in the 1945 general election.
Devonport has had a number of prominent MPs, including Leslie Hore-Belisha, Michael Foot (who began his Commons career in the seat), and the former SDP leader David Owen.

John Foot, Baron Foot

John FootLord FootJohn
Michael Foot's siblings included: Sir Dingle Foot MP (1905–78), a Liberal and subsequently Labour MP; Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon (1907–90), Governor of Cyprus (1957–60) and representative of the United Kingdom at the United Nations from 1964–70; Liberal politician John Foot, later Baron Foot (1909–99); Margaret Elizabeth Foot (1911–65); Jennifer Mackintosh Highet (born 1916); and Christopher Isaac Foot (1917–84).
His younger siblings were Margaret Elizabeth Foot (1911–1965), Michael Foot (1913–2010), a Labour MP, Cabinet Minister and Leader of the Opposition (1980–1983), Jennifer Mackintosh Highet (born 1916) and Christopher Isaac Foot (born 1917).

David Lewis (politician)

David LewisDavid Lewis (Losz)LEWIS, David
A Liberal up to this time, Foot was converted to socialism by Oxford University Labour Club president David Lewis, a Canadian Rhodes scholar, and others: "... I knew him [at Oxford] when I was a Liberal [and Lewis] played a part in converting me to socialism."
Michael Foot, the future leader of the British Labour Party, mentioned in an interview that Lewis was, "the most powerful socialist debater in the place. I don't think with any rival ... He had a very powerful influence indeed amongst students, partly because he had so much more experience than the rest of us but partly because he had brilliant debating powers. I mean one of the best I've ever heard. If you talk of tough political debates, well, he was absolutely unbeatable ... I knew him [at Oxford] when I was a Liberal [and] he played a part in converting me to socialism."

Ian Mikardo

Mikardo
Before the Cold War began in the late 1940s, Foot favoured a 'third way' foreign policy for Europe (he was joint author with Richard Crossman and Ian Mikardo of the pamphlet Keep Left in 1947), but in the wake of the communist seizure of power in Hungary and Czechoslovakia he and Tribune took a strongly anti-communist position, eventually embracing NATO.
He issued many pamphlets, the most famous were Keep Left (1947) and Keeping Left with Dick Crossman, Michael Foot and Jo Richardson, 1950.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
Michael Foot's siblings included: Sir Dingle Foot MP (1905–78), a Liberal and subsequently Labour MP; Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon (1907–90), Governor of Cyprus (1957–60) and representative of the United Kingdom at the United Nations from 1964–70; Liberal politician John Foot, later Baron Foot (1909–99); Margaret Elizabeth Foot (1911–65); Jennifer Mackintosh Highet (born 1916); and Christopher Isaac Foot (1917–84). Isaac Foot was an active member of the Liberal Party and was the Liberal Member of Parliament for Bodmin in Cornwall from 1922–24 and again from 1929–35, and a Lord Mayor of Plymouth.
Several Labour ministers of later generations, such as Michael Foot and Tony Benn, were the sons of Liberal MPs.

New Statesman

The New StatesmanNew Statesman and NationNew Statesman and Society
Foot became a journalist, working briefly on the New Statesman, before joining the left-wing weekly Tribune when it was set up in early 1937 to support the Unity Campaign, an attempt to secure an anti-fascist United Front between Labour and other left-wing parties.
The young Labour MP Richard Crossman, who had been an assistant editor for the magazine before the war, was Martin's chief lieutenant in this period, and the Statesman published Keep Left, the pamphlet written by Crossman, Michael Foot and Ian Mikardo, that most succinctly laid out the Labour left's proposals for a "third force" foreign policy rather than alliance with the United States.

Appeasement

appeasement of Hitlerappeaseappeaser
He co-wrote the classic 1940 polemic against appeasement of Adolf Hitler, Guilty Men, under a pseudonym.
Three British journalists, Michael Foot, Frank Owen and Peter Howard, writing under the name of "Cato" in their book Guilty Men, called for the removal from office of 15 public figures they held accountable, including Chamberlain and Baldwin.

Plymouth College

PlymouthPlymouth and Mannamead CollegePlymouth College Preparatory School
Foot was educated at Plymouth College Preparatory School, Forres School in Swanage, and Leighton Park School in Reading.

Leader of the Labour Party (UK)

Leader of the Labour PartyLeaderLabour leader
Elected as a compromise candidate, Foot served as the Leader of the Labour Party, and Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983. Michael Mackintosh Foot (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010), was a British Labour Party politician who served as Labour Leader from 1980 to 1983.
However, Neil Kinnock was also elevated to the House of Lords, despite never being Prime Minister, and Michael Foot declined a similar offer.

Harold Wilson

Wilsonwhite heat of technologySir Harold Wilson
He was appointed to the Cabinet as Secretary of State for Employment under Harold Wilson in 1974, and he later served as Leader of the House of Commons (1976–1979) under James Callaghan.
Six candidates stood in the first ballot; in order of votes they were: Michael Foot, James Callaghan, Roy Jenkins, Tony Benn, Denis Healey and Anthony Crosland.

Keep Left (pamphlet)

Keep LeftKeep Left GroupKeep Left" (pamphlet)
Before the Cold War began in the late 1940s, Foot favoured a 'third way' foreign policy for Europe (he was joint author with Richard Crossman and Ian Mikardo of the pamphlet Keep Left in 1947), but in the wake of the communist seizure of power in Hungary and Czechoslovakia he and Tribune took a strongly anti-communist position, eventually embracing NATO.
Keep Left was a pamphlet published in the United Kingdom in 1947 by the New Statesman that was written by Michael Foot, Richard Crossman and Ian Mikardo.