Michael Powell

Powell
Michael Latham Powell (30 September 1905 – 19 February 1990) was an English film director, celebrated for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger.wikipedia
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Emeric Pressburger

PressburgerEmeric Pressburger’s
Michael Latham Powell (30 September 1905 – 19 February 1990) was an English film director, celebrated for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger.
He is best known for his series of film collaborations with Michael Powell, in a collaboration partnership known as the Archers, and produced a series of films, including 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (US: Stairway to Heaven, 1946), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).

Powell and Pressburger

Michael Powell and Emeric PressburgerPowell & PressburgerThe Archers
Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).
The British film-making partnership of Michael Powell (1905–1990) and Emeric Pressburger (1902–1988)—together often known as The Archers, the name of their production company—made a series of influential films in the 1940s and 1950s.

49th Parallel (film)

49th ParallelThe Invaders49th Parallel'' (film)
Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).
The British Ministry of Information approached Michael Powell to make a propaganda film for them, suggesting he make "a film about mine-sweeping".

The Red Shoes (1948 film)

The Red Shoes1948 filmfilm
Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).
The Red Shoes is a 1948 British drama film written, directed, and produced by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, and starring Moira Shearer, Anton Walbrook, and Marius Goring.

The Tales of Hoffmann (film)

The Tales of Hoffmann1951 filmTales of Hoffmann
Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).
The Tales of Hoffmann is a 1951 British Technicolor comic opera film written, produced and directed by the team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger working under the umbrella of their production company, The Archers.

Peeping Tom (1960 film)

Peeping TomPeeping Tom (film)Peeping Tom'' (1960 film)
His later controversial 1960 film Peeping Tom, while today considered a classic, and a contender as the first "slasher", was so vilified on first release that his career was seriously damaged. Although admirers would argue that Powell ought to rank alongside fellow British directors Alfred Hitchcock and David Lean, his career suffered a severe reversal after the release of the controversial psychological thriller film Peeping Tom, made in 1960 as a solo effort.
Peeping Tom is a 1960 British psychological horror-thriller film directed by Michael Powell, written by Leo Marks, and starring Carl Boehm, Anna Massey, and Moira Shearer.

Slasher film

slasherslasher movieslasher films
His later controversial 1960 film Peeping Tom, while today considered a classic, and a contender as the first "slasher", was so vilified on first release that his career was seriously damaged.
That same year Michael Powell released Peeping Tom, showing the killer's perspective as he murders women to photograph their dying expressions.

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951).
*Making their second appearance in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp were director Michael Powell's golden cocker spaniels, Erik and Spangle, who had previously appeared in Contraband (1940), and went on to be seen in the Powell and Pressburger films I Know Where I'm Going! (1945) and A Matter of Life and Death (US: Stairway to Heaven, 1946).

BAFTA Fellowship

BAFTA Academy Fellowship AwardAcademy FellowshipBAFTA Fellow
In 1981, he received the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award along with his partner Pressburger, the highest honour the British Film Academy can give a filmmaker.

Red Ensign (film)

Red Ensign
From 1931 to 1936, Powell was the director of 23 films, including the critically received Red Ensign (1934) and The Phantom Light (1935).
Red Ensign is a 1934 film directed by British filmmaker Michael Powell.

Two Crowded Hours

Although he had taken on some directing responsibilities in other films, Powell had his first screen credit as a director on Two Crowded Hours (1931).
Two Crowded Hours is a 1931 British comedy drama film directed by Michael Powell and starring John Longden, Jane Welsh, and Jerry Verno.

The Phantom Light

a film
From 1931 to 1936, Powell was the director of 23 films, including the critically received Red Ensign (1934) and The Phantom Light (1935).
The Phantom Light is a 1935 British crime film, a low-budget "quota quickie" directed by Michael Powell and starring Binnie Hale, Gordon Harker, Milton Rosmer and Herbert Lomas.

BFI Top 100 British films

Top 100 British films100 greatest British films of the 20th centurygreatest British film of all time
The BFI 100 list of "the favourite British films of the 20th century" contains five of Powell's films, four with Pressburger.

Raymond Durgnat

Durgnat, RaymondDurgnat, Raymond E
The film did however meet with the rapturous approval of the young critics of Positif and Midi-Minuit Fantastique in France, and those of Motion in England, and in 1965 he was subject of a major positive revaluation by Raymond Durgnat in the auteurist magazine Movie, later included in Durgnat's influential book A Mirror for England.
In 1965 he published the first major critical essay on Michael Powell, who had hitherto been "fashionably dismissed by critics as a 'technician’s director'", as Durgnat put it.

Martin Scorsese

ScorseseMartinMartin Scorcese
Many film-makers such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and George A. Romero have cited Powell as an influence.
Scorsese made a brief cameo appearance in the film Anna Pavlova (also known as A Woman for All Time), originally intended to be directed by one of his heroes, Michael Powell.

Rex Ingram (director)

Rex IngramReginald Ingram Montgomery Hitchcock
Powell entered the film industry in 1925 through working with director Rex Ingram at the Victorine Studios in Nice, France (the contact with Ingram was made through Powell's father, who owned a hotel in Nice).
Amongst those who worked for Ingram at MGM on the Riviera during this period was the young Michael Powell, who later went on to direct (with Emeric Pressburger) The Red Shoes and other classics, and technician Leonti Planskoy.

Thriller film

thrillersuspensesuspense film
Although admirers would argue that Powell ought to rank alongside fellow British directors Alfred Hitchcock and David Lean, his career suffered a severe reversal after the release of the controversial psychological thriller film Peeping Tom, made in 1960 as a solo effort.
Director Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960) featured Carl Boehm as a psychopathic cameraman.

Conrad Veidt

Nonetheless, Powell was brought in to save a film that was being made as a vehicle for two of Korda's star players, Conrad Veidt and Valerie Hobson.
By this point multi-lingual, Veidt made films in both French with expatriate French directors and in English, including three of his best-known roles for British director Michael Powell in The Spy in Black (1939), Contraband (1940) and The Thief of Bagdad (1940).

Kathleen Byron

During the 1940s, Powell had love affairs with actresses Deborah Kerr and Kathleen Byron.
The director Michael Powell persuaded her to return to Britain where she made her best remembered films.

Honeymoon (1959 film)

HoneymoonLuna de MielHoneymoon'' (1959 film)
Honeymoon (Luna de miel), also shown as The Lovers of Teruel in the United States, is a 1959 film by the British director-writer Michael Powell based in part on the ballet El Amor Brujo by Gregorio Martínez Sierra.

Cornelia Frances

His niece was the Australian actress Cornelia Frances, who appeared in bit parts in her uncle's early films.
This included bit parts in two films directed by her uncle Michael Powell: Peeping Tom (1960), and The Queen's Guards (1961).

Deborah Kerr

Deborah Jane Kerr
During the 1940s, Powell had love affairs with actresses Deborah Kerr and Kathleen Byron.
In 1943, Deborah Kerr played three women in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

British Academy of Film and Television Arts

BAFTABAFTA AwardBAFTA Awards
In 1981, he received the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award along with his partner Pressburger, the highest honour the British Film Academy can give a filmmaker.
BAFTA started out as the British Film Academy, was founded in 1947 by a group of directors David Lean, Alexander Korda, Roger Manvell, Laurence Olivier, Emeric Pressburger, Michael Powell, Michael Balcon, Carol Reed, and other major figures of the British film industry.

The Magician (1926 film)

The Magician1926film of the same name
Powell made his film début as a "comic English tourist" in The Magician (1926).
A young Michael Powell made a brief appearance in a comedic role and also acted as assistant director.

Rynox

Rynox is a 1932 British crime film directed by Michael Powell and starring Stewart Rome and John Longden.