Michal

Mikal
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel.wikipedia
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List of minor Old Testament figures, L–Z

MerabNaphishNebuzaradan
identifies Saul's elder daughter as Merab and younger daughter as Michal.
Laish is a name which appears in 1 Samuel 25:44 and 2 Samuel 3:15, where it is the name of the father of Palti, or Paltiel, the man who was married to Saul's daughter Michal before she was returned to David.

Saul

King SaulBattle of GilboaSaul the King
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel.
Saul married Ahinoam, daughter of Ahimaaz, with whom he sired four sons (Jonathan, Abinadab, Malchishua and Ish-bosheth) and two daughters (Merab and Michal).

Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy)

Kingdom of IsraelUnited MonarchyIsrael
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel.
David and Saul become bitter enemies, at least from Saul's point of view, although sources describe Jonathan, Saul's son, and Michal, Saul's daughter, as assisting David to escape Saul, ultimately leading to a brief reconciliation before Saul's death.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel. While David was hiding for his life, Saul gave Michal as a wife to Palti, son of Laish, and David took several other wives, including Abigail.
Having been told that his younger daughter Michal was in love with David, Saul gave her in marriage to David upon David's payment in Philistine foreskins (ancient Jewish historian Josephus lists the dowry as 600 Philistine heads).

Abigail

AbbyAvigail
While David was hiding for his life, Saul gave Michal as a wife to Palti, son of Laish, and David took several other wives, including Abigail.
Abigail was David's third wife, after Saul's daughter, Michal, whom Saul later married to Palti, son of Laish when David went into hiding, and Ahinoam.

Teraphim

idolsteraphthe household gods
She lets David down through a window and hides teraphim in his bed as a ruse.
In 1 Samuel 19, Michal helps her husband David to escape from her father Saul.

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel.

Palti, son of Laish

PaltiPalti ben LaishPaltiel
While David was hiding for his life, Saul gave Michal as a wife to Palti, son of Laish, and David took several other wives, including Abigail.
Palti (or Paltiel), son of Laish, who was from Gallim, was the second husband of Michal, Saul's daughter.

Ish-bosheth

IshbaalIshboshethEsh-baal
Later, when David became king of Judah and Ish-bosheth (Michal's brother, and Saul's son) was king of Israel, David demanded her return to him in return for peace between them.
Before the death of Saul, David had been married to Saul's daughter Michal, Ishbosheth's sister, until Saul and David had a falling out and Saul gave her to another man.

Ark of the Covenant

arkArk of GodThe Ark of the Covenant
After Michal was returned to David, she criticised him for dancing in an undignified manner, as he brought the Ark of the Covenant to the newly captured Jerusalem in a religious procession.
On hearing that God had blessed Obed-edom because of the presence of the Ark in his house, David had the Ark brought to Zion by the Levites, while he himself, "girded with a linen ephod ... danced before the Lord with all his might" and in the sight of all the public gathered in Jerusalem—a performance that caused him to be scornfully rebuked by his first wife, Saul's daughter Michal.

Adriel

Adriel the Meholathite
Later, after Merab had married Adriel the Meholathite, Saul invited David to marry Michal.
The claim that Michal "brought up" these five sons has been taken to mean either that she treated them as if she had been their own mother, or that for "Michal" we should read "Merab" in 2 Samuel 21:8, as in 1 Sam.

Georg Christian Lehms

Lehms
The first of these was Die unglückselige Princessin Michal und der verfolgte David ('The hapless Princess Michal and David pursued'), published in Hanover in 1707, followed in 1710 by Des israelitischen Printzens Absolons und seiner Prinzcessin Schwester Thamar Staats- Lebens- und Helden-Geschichte ('The Heroic Life and History of the Israelite Prince Absolom and his Princess Sister Tamar'), published by Zieger in Nuremberg; in 1712 the series continued with Der weise König Salomo ('Wise King Solomon').

Michel (name)

Michel
This can be compared to French spelling "Michel", which is also a local form of "Michael".
When of Czech, Slovak or Polish origin it is a variant of the personal name Michal.

Rachel Bluwstein

RachelRa'hel BluwsteinRachel (Bluvshtein)
In some poems Rachel expresses identification with biblical figures such as Rachel, her namesake matriarch, and Michal, wife of David.

Kings of Judah

King of JudahJudahKing
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel. Later, when David became king of Judah and Ish-bosheth (Michal's brother, and Saul's son) was king of Israel, David demanded her return to him in return for peace between them.

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
After his success in battle against the Philistine giant Goliath, Merab was given in marriage to Adriel.

Goliath

David and GoliathDavid vs. GoliathDavid versus Goliath
After his success in battle against the Philistine giant Goliath, Merab was given in marriage to Adriel.

Bride price

bridewealthbride-pricebride wealth
David replied, "I am a poor and lightly esteemed man", meaning that he was unable to provide a bride price.

Foreskin

prepuceforeskinspenial sheath
Saul then advised him that no bride price was required except for the foreskins of 100 Philistines.

Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelNorthern Kingdom of Israel
Later, when David became king of Judah and Ish-bosheth (Michal's brother, and Saul's son) was king of Israel, David demanded her return to him in return for peace between them.

Robert Alter

Alter, Prof. Dr. Robert BernardRobert B. AlterRobertAlter
Robert Alter observes that by stressing that he had paid the requested bride price, David makes a legal argument as a political calculation to reinforce his legitimacy as a member of the royal house.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem, IsraelAl-QudsQuds
After Michal was returned to David, she criticised him for dancing in an undignified manner, as he brought the Ark of the Covenant to the newly captured Jerusalem in a religious procession.

Bathsheba

David and BathshebaBathsheba at Her BathBethsheba
For this she is punished, according to Samuel, with not having children till the day she dies Unlike Abigail and Bathsheba, Michal is not described as being beautiful, though Rabbinic tradition holds that she was of "entrancing beauty."

Zionism

ZionistZionistsZionist movement
"Michal" was one of several Biblical names embraced by Zionism, very rarely found in pre-Zionist communities.