Microwave

microwavesmicrowave radiationmicrowave tubemicrowave energymicrowave regionmicrowave imagerymicrowave systemsaffected their healthC to J frequency rangeextremely wide bandwidth
Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from about one meter to one millimeter; with frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz.wikipedia
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Ultra high frequency

UHFUHF bandUHF radio
Different sources define different frequency ranges as microwaves; the above broad definition includes both UHF and EHF (millimeter wave) bands.
Radio waves with frequencies above the UHF band fall into the super-high frequency (SHF) or microwave frequency range.

S band

S-bandSS-
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The S band is a designation by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for a part of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum covering frequencies from 2 to 4 gigahertz (GHz).

X band

XX-bandX-
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The X band is the designation for a band of frequencies in the microwave radio region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Ku band

K u bandK u -bandK u
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The K u band is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies from 12 to 18 gigahertz (GHz).

C band (IEEE)

C bandC-bandC
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The C-band is a designation by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 4.0 to 8.0 gigahertz (GHz); however, this definition is the one used by radar manufacturers and users, not necessarily by microwave radio telecommunications users.

Ka band

K a bandK a Ka
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The K a band (pronounced as either "kay-ay band" or "ka band") is a portion of the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum defined as frequencies in the range 26.5–40 gigahertz (GHz), i.e. wavelengths from slightly over one centimeter down to 7.5 millimeters.

Super high frequency

SHFSHF-bandcentimetric
In all cases, microwaves include the entire SHF band (3 to 30 GHz, or 10 to 1 cm) at minimum.
These frequencies fall within the microwave band, so radio waves with these frequencies are called microwaves.

Terahertz radiation

terahertzTHzsubmillimeter-wave
The boundaries between far infrared, terahertz radiation, microwaves, and ultra-high-frequency radio waves are fairly arbitrary and are used variously between different fields of study.
Terahertz radiation occupies a middle ground between microwaves and infrared light waves known as the “terahertz gap”, where technology for its generation and manipulation is in its infancy.

Radar

radar stationradarsradar system
Microwaves are widely used in modern technology, for example in point-to-point communication links, wireless networks, microwave radio relay networks, radar, satellite and spacecraft communication, medical diathermy and cancer treatment, remote sensing, radio astronomy, particle accelerators, spectroscopy, industrial heating, collision avoidance systems, garage door openers and keyless entry systems, and for cooking food in microwave ovens.
A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s).

Microwave oven

microwavemicrowave ovensmicrowaving
Microwaves are widely used in modern technology, for example in point-to-point communication links, wireless networks, microwave radio relay networks, radar, satellite and spacecraft communication, medical diathermy and cancer treatment, remote sensing, radio astronomy, particle accelerators, spectroscopy, industrial heating, collision avoidance systems, garage door openers and keyless entry systems, and for cooking food in microwave ovens.
A microwave oven (also commonly referred to as a microwave) is an electric oven that heats and cooks food by exposing it to electromagnetic radiation in the microwave frequency range.

Diathermy

diathermiadiathermy deviceRF diathermy
Microwaves are widely used in modern technology, for example in point-to-point communication links, wireless networks, microwave radio relay networks, radar, satellite and spacecraft communication, medical diathermy and cancer treatment, remote sensing, radio astronomy, particle accelerators, spectroscopy, industrial heating, collision avoidance systems, garage door openers and keyless entry systems, and for cooking food in microwave ovens.
Diathermy is produced by three techniques: ultrasound (ultrasonic diathermy), short-wave radio frequencies in the range 1–100 MHz (shortwave diathermy) or microwaves typically in the 915 MHz or 2.45 GHz bands (microwave diathermy), the methods differing mainly in their penetration capability.

K band (IEEE)

K bandKK-band
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
The IEEE K band is a portion of the radio spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies from 18 to 27 gigahertz (GHz).

Electromagnetic spectrum

spectrumspectrawhite light
Microwaves occupy a place in the electromagnetic spectrum with frequency above ordinary radio waves, and below infrared light:
This frequency range is divided into separate bands, and the electromagnetic waves within each frequency band are called by different names; beginning at the low frequency (long wavelength) end of the spectrum these are: radio waves, microwaves, terahertz waves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays at the high-frequency (short wavelength) end.

Wireless network

wireless networkingwirelesswireless networks
Microwaves are widely used in modern technology, for example in point-to-point communication links, wireless networks, microwave radio relay networks, radar, satellite and spacecraft communication, medical diathermy and cancer treatment, remote sensing, radio astronomy, particle accelerators, spectroscopy, industrial heating, collision avoidance systems, garage door openers and keyless entry systems, and for cooking food in microwave ovens.
Examples of wireless networks include cell phone networks, wireless local area networks (WLANs), wireless sensor networks, satellite communication networks, and terrestrial microwave networks.

Wave

wavestravelling wavetraveling wave
The boundaries between far infrared, terahertz radiation, microwaves, and ultra-high-frequency radio waves are fairly arbitrary and are used variously between different fields of study.
These types vary in wavelength, and include radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays and gamma rays.

Rain fade

fadingrainrain attenuation
Microwaves are absorbed by moisture in the atmosphere, and the attenuation increases with frequency, becoming a significant factor (rain fade) at the high end of the band.
Rain fade refers primarily to the absorption of a microwave radio frequency (RF) signal by atmospheric rain, snow, or ice, and losses which are especially prevalent at frequencies above 11 GHz.

Light

visible lightvisiblelight source
In this sense, gamma rays, X-rays, microwaves and radio waves are also light.

Infrared

IRnear-infraredinfra-red
Microwaves occupy a place in the electromagnetic spectrum with frequency above ordinary radio waves, and below infrared light:

Phased array

phased array radarphased-arrayphased-array radar
Another directive antenna practical at microwave frequencies is the phased array, a computer-controlled array of antennas which produces a beam which can be electronically steered in different directions.
Since the array must consist of many small antennas (sometimes thousands) to achieve high gain, phased arrays are mainly practical at the high frequency end of the radio spectrum, in the UHF and microwave bands, in which the antenna elements are conveniently small.

Waveguide (electromagnetism)

waveguidewaveguideselectromagnetic waveguide
At microwave frequencies, the transmission lines which are used to carry lower frequency radio waves to and from antennas, such as coaxial cable and parallel wire lines, have excessive power losses, so when low attenuation is required microwaves are carried by metal pipes called waveguides.
This type of waveguide is used as a transmission line mostly at microwave frequencies, for such purposes as connecting microwave transmitters and receivers to their antennas, in equipment such as microwave ovens, radar sets, satellite communications, and microwave radio links.

Horn antenna

hornhornsCorrugated Horn
Parabolic ("dish") antennas are the most widely used directive antennas at microwave frequencies, but horn antennas, slot antennas and dielectric lens antennas are also used.
Horns are widely used as antennas at UHF and microwave frequencies, above 300 MHz.

Radio spectrum

bandradio bandspectrum
Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, K u, K, or K a band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.
Frequency bands in the microwave range are designated by letters.

Optics

opticalopticoptical device
In turn, at even higher frequencies, where the wavelength of the electromagnetic waves becomes small in comparison to the size of the structures used to process them, microwave techniques become inadequate, and the methods of optics are used.
Because light is an electromagnetic wave, other forms of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves exhibit similar properties.

Parabolic antenna

dish antennaparabolicparabolic dish antenna
Parabolic ("dish") antennas are the most widely used directive antennas at microwave frequencies, but horn antennas, slot antennas and dielectric lens antennas are also used.
In order to achieve narrow beamwidths, the parabolic reflector must be much larger than the wavelength of the radio waves used, so parabolic antennas are used in the high frequency part of the radio spectrum, at UHF and microwave (SHF) frequencies, at which the wavelengths are small enough that conveniently-sized reflectors can be used.

Waveguide

waveguideswave guidewaveguiding
Open-wire and coaxial transmission lines used at lower frequencies are replaced by waveguides and stripline, and lumped-element tuned circuits are replaced by cavity resonators or resonant stubs.
The original and most common meaning is a hollow conductive metal pipe used to carry high frequency radio waves, particularly microwaves.