Middle class

middle-classmiddlemiddle classesmiddle incomemiddle-incomemiddle-professional classmanagerial classMiddle Americawhite collar workers
The term middle class was coined by James Bradshaw in a 1745 pamphlet Scheme to prevent running Irish Wools to France.wikipedia
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Social stratification

social hierarchystratificationstratified
The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy.
In modern Western societies, social stratification is typically defined in terms of three social classes: (i) the upper class, (ii) the middle class, and (iii) the lower class; in turn, each class can be subdivided into strata, e.g. the upper-stratum, the middle-stratum, and the lower stratum.

Petite bourgeoisie

petty bourgeoispetty bourgeoisiepetit bourgeois
Within capitalism, "middle-class" initially referred to the bourgeoisie; later, with the further differentiation of classes as capitalist societies developed, the term came to be synonymous with the term petite bourgeoisie.
It originally denoted a sub-stratum of the middle classes in the 18th and early-19th centuries.

Upper class

upper-classhigh societyupper
The modern usage of the term "middle-class", however, dates to the 1913 UK Registrar-General's report, in which the statistician T.H.C. Stevenson identified the middle class as those falling between the upper-class and the working-class.
The term is often used in conjunction with terms like upper-middle class, middle class, and working class as part of a model of social stratification.

Etiquette

mannersprotocolpropriety
To identify with the social élite, the upwardly mobile middle class and the bourgeoisie adopted the behaviours and the artistic preferences of the upper class.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
The modern usage of the term "middle-class", however, dates to the 1913 UK Registrar-General's report, in which the statistician T.H.C. Stevenson identified the middle class as those falling between the upper-class and the working-class.
When this approach is used, the working class can be contrasted with a so-called middle class on the basis of differential terms of access to economic resources, education, cultural interests, and other goods and services.

New Labour

Labour1997–2010 Labour governmentLabour government
The Labour Party in the UK, which grew out of the organised labour movement and originally drew almost all of its support from the working-class, reinvented itself under Tony Blair in the 1990s as "New Labour", a party competing with the Conservative Party for the votes of the middle-class as well as those of the Labour Party's traditional group of voters - the working-class.
Following the leadership of Neil Kinnock and John Smith, the party under the New Labour brand attempted to widen its electoral appeal and by the 1997 general election it had made significant gains in the upper and middle-classes, effectively giving the party a landslide victory.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The Labour Party in the UK, which grew out of the organised labour movement and originally drew almost all of its support from the working-class, reinvented itself under Tony Blair in the 1990s as "New Labour", a party competing with the Conservative Party for the votes of the middle-class as well as those of the Labour Party's traditional group of voters - the working-class.
It used the dissatisfaction with the socialist and egalitarian policies of the Labour Party to rally middle-class supporters and build a political comeback that won them the 1951 general election.

Bourgeoisie

bourgeoisburgherburghers
While the nobility owned much of the countryside, and the peasantry worked it, a new bourgeoisie (literally "town-dwellers") arose around mercantile functions in the city.
The Nazi Party had many working-class supporters and members, and a strong appeal to the middle class.

U and non-U English

U and non-Ulavatorynon-U
U and non-U English usage, with "U" standing for "upper class", and "non-U" representing the aspiring middle classes, was part of the terminology of popular discourse of social dialects (sociolects) in Britain in the 1950s.

Wealth

Savingsaffluentwealthy
The middle class views wealth as something for emergencies and it is seen as more of a cushion.

Management

managerBusiness Managementmanagers
This group of middle-class professionals is distinguished from other social classes by their training and education (typically business qualifications and university degrees), with example occupations including academics and teachers, social workers, engineers, managers, nurses, and middle-level administrators.
suggesting the difficulty of defining management without circularity, the shifting nature of definitions and the connection of managerial practices with the existence of a managerial cadre or of a class.

American middle class

middle classmiddle-classAmerican middle-class
This difference is due to the extreme difference in definitions between The Economist and many other models.
Several reasons can be cited as to why the professional middle class is so influential.

Upper middle class

upper-middle classupper-middle-classupper middle-class
In sociology, the upper middle class is the social group constituted by higher status members of the middle class.

Social class

classsocial classesclasses
The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy.
A social class is a set of concepts in the social sciences and political theory centered on models of social stratification in which people are grouped into a set of hierarchical social categories, the most common being the upper, middle and lower classes.

Lower middle class

lower-middle classlower-middle-classlower middle-class
In developed nations across the world, the lower middle class is a sub-division of the greater middle class.

Middle-class squeeze

middle class squeezeSqueezed Middle[6
The middle-class squeeze is the situation where increases in wages fail to keep up with inflation for middle-income earners leading to a relative decline in real wages, while at the same time, the phenomenon fails to have a similar effect on the top wage earners.

Ilustrado

IlustradosillustradosIllustrado
They were the middle class who were educated in Spain and exposed to Spanish liberal and European nationalist ideals.

Essex man

Mondeo ManBasildon Man" or "Essex ManEssex Boy
With the decline of manufacturing and skilled manual work in the 1980s, this group increasingly looked to middle-class professions for employment, or became self-employed.

Status paradox

Status paradox of migration
Because of global inequalities in terms of wealth and buying power transnational migrants to which the status paradox applies challenge local middle classes in the sending countries.

Dominant culture

majority culturedominancedominant white culture
In the United States, a distinction is often made between the indigenous culture of Native Americans, and a dominant culture that may be described as "WASP", "Anglo", "white", "middle class", and so on.

The Lonely Crowd

The Lonely Crowd: A Study of the Changing American Character
This defined the middle class that no longer had the material needed to cling to past life standards to form a cohesive society.

Capitalism

capitalistcapitalistscapitalistic
Within capitalism, "middle-class" initially referred to the bourgeoisie; later, with the further differentiation of classes as capitalist societies developed, the term came to be synonymous with the term petite bourgeoisie.

Marxism

MarxistMarxistsMarxist ideology
Marxism defines social classes according to their relationship with the means of production.

Means of production

productive propertydifferent organizations of productionforces
Marxism defines social classes according to their relationship with the means of production.