Midnight Cowboy

Enrico "Ratso" RizzoRatso Rizzo
Midnight Cowboy is a 1969 American buddy drama film.wikipedia
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John Schlesinger

SchlesingerJohn Richard SchlesingerJohn Schesinger
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
He won an Academy Award for Best Director for Midnight Cowboy, and was nominated for two other films (Darling and Sunday Bloody Sunday).

Jon Voight

Jon VoigtAwards and nominationsJohn Voight
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
Voight came to prominence in the late 1960s with his Oscar-nominated performance as Joe Buck, a would-be gigolo in Midnight Cowboy (1969).

Waldo Salt

Waldo Salt Screenwriting Awardthe Waldo Salt Screenwriting AwardWaldo Sat Screenwriting award
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
Waldo Miller Salt (October 18, 1914 – March 7, 1987) was an American screenwriter who won Academy Awards for both Midnight Cowboy and Coming Home.

Dustin Hoffman

Dusty' Hoffman
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
Hoffman's films include Midnight Cowboy, Little Big Man, Papillon, Lenny, Marathon Man, All the President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, Tootsie, Rain Man, Hook, and Wag the Dog.

Sylvia Miles

Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
She was twice nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performances in Midnight Cowboy (1969) and Farewell, My Lovely (1975).

Bob Balaban

Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
Balaban's other film roles include the drama Midnight Cowboy (1969); the science fiction films Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), Altered States (1980), and 2010 (1984); the Christopher Guest comedies Waiting for Guffman (1996), Best in Show (2000), A Mighty Wind (2003), and For Your Consideration (2006); the dark fantasy film Lady in the Water (2006); and the Wes Anderson films Moonrise Kingdom (2012), The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014), and Isle of Dogs (2018).

42nd Academy Awards

(42nd)19691970
At the 42nd Academy Awards, the film won three awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.
Midnight Cowboy became the first – and so far, the only – X-rated film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Buddy film

buddybuddy comedybuddy movie
Midnight Cowboy is a 1969 American buddy drama film.
The decades' buddy films included Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Easy Rider (1969), Midnight Cowboy (1969), Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974), and Dog Day Afternoon (1975).

Jennifer Salt

Jennifer
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
An early movie role was in Midnight Cowboy (1969), as Joe Buck's home town lover, Crazy Annie.

Brenda Vaccaro

Vaccaro
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
Vaccaro appeared with Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in the 1969 film Midnight Cowboy, for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Barnard Hughes

The Seekers
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
On screen, he appeared in the film transcription of Hamlet (1964), and also appeared in such films as Midnight Cowboy (1969), Where's Poppa? (1970), Cold Turkey (1971) The Hospital (1971), Tron (1982), Maxie (1985), The Lost Boys (1987), Da (1988) - the screen reprise of his most successful stage-role, Doc Hollywood (1991) and the big success Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993).

Midnight Cowboy (novel)

Midnight Cowboynovel of the same namenovel
Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.
In 1969, the novel was made into the movie Midnight Cowboy starring Dustin Hoffman as Ratso and Jon Voight as Joe.

Academy Award for Best Director

Best DirectorDirectorAcademy Award
At the 42nd Academy Awards, the film won three awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Academy Award for Best Picture

Best PictureBest Picture OscarOutstanding Production
At the 42nd Academy Awards, the film won three awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies

AFI's 100 Years... 100 MoviesAFI's 100 Years ... 100 Movies100 Years...100 Movies
It has since been placed 36th on the American Film Institute's list of the 100 greatest American films of all time, and 43rd on its 2007 updated version.

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Adapted ScreenplayBest Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another MediumBest Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
At the 42nd Academy Awards, the film won three awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.

X rating

X-ratedX certificateX-rating
Midnight Cowboy is the only X-rated film ever to win Best Picture.
From the late 1960s to about the mid-1980s, many mainstream films were released with an X rating, such as Midnight Cowboy, Medium Cool, Last Summer, Last of the Mobile Hot Shots, Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, A Clockwork Orange, Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song, Fritz the Cat, Last Tango in Paris and The Evil Dead.

Georgann Johnson

In films, Johnson had roles in Short Cut to Hell (1957), Midnight Cowboy (1969), From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1973), Health (1980), The Day After (1983), The Slugger's Wife (1985), Murphy's Romance (1985) and Quicksilver (1986).

Jerome Hellman

27 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes, is often said to have been improvised, but producer Jerome Hellman disputes this account on the 2-disc DVD set of Midnight Cowboy.
He is best known for being the 42nd recipient of the Academy Award for Best Picture for Midnight Cowboy (1969).

Big Spring, Texas

Big SpringBig Spring, TXBig Spring, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area
The opening scenes were filmed in Big Spring, Texas.
Big Spring was featured in the 1969 film Midnight Cowboy, which starred Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight, and received the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1969.

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film RegistryLibrary of Congress National Film Registry
In 1994, Midnight Cowboy was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

John McGiver

Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes.

Ruth White (actress)

Ruth White
By the end of the 1960s, she had become one of New York's most highly praised and in demand character actresses, and appeared in Midnight Cowboy, Hang 'Em High and No Way To Treat A Lady.

Times Square

Time SquareLongacre SquareNew York Times Square
His room overlooked the northern half of Times Square.
Later that decade, Times Square was depicted in Midnight Cowboy as gritty, dark and desperate, and conditions only worsened in the 1970s and 1980s, as did the crime in the rest of the city.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
In the film, Joe stays at the Hotel Claridge, at the southeast corner of Broadway and West 44th Street in Midtown Manhattan.
After becoming the city's de facto red-light district in the 1960s and 1970s (as can be seen in the films Taxi Driver and Midnight Cowboy), since the late 1980s Times Square has emerged as a family tourist center, in effect being Disneyfied following the company's purchase and renovation of the New Amsterdam Theatre on 42nd Street in 1993.