Mike Scioscia

Scioscia
Michael Lorri Scioscia (, ; born November 27, 1958) is an American former Major League Baseball catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB).wikipedia
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Catcher

Ccatchingcatchers
Michael Lorri Scioscia (, ; born November 27, 1958) is an American former Major League Baseball catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB).
Because the position requires a comprehensive understanding of the game's strategies, the pool of former catchers yields a disproportionate number of managers in both Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball, including such prominent examples as Connie Mack, Steve O'Neill, Al López, Mike Scioscia, Joe Girardi, and Joe Torre.

2000 Major League Baseball season

20002000 season2000 MLB season
He managed the Anaheim / Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim / Los Angeles Angels from the 2000 season through the 2018 season, and was the longest-tenured manager in Major League Baseball and second-longest-tenured coach/manager in the "Big Four" (MLB, NFL, NHL, and NBA), behind only Gregg Popovich.

Los Angeles Angels

California AngelsAngelsAnaheim Angels
He managed the Anaheim / Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim / Los Angeles Angels from the 2000 season through the 2018 season, and was the longest-tenured manager in Major League Baseball and second-longest-tenured coach/manager in the "Big Four" (MLB, NFL, NHL, and NBA), behind only Gregg Popovich.
Under Disney's ownership and the leadership of manager Mike Scioscia, the Angels won their first pennant and World Series championship in 2002.

Manager (baseball)

managermanagedmanagers
Michael Lorri Scioscia (, ; born November 27, 1958) is an American former Major League Baseball catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB).
A high proportion of current and former managers played the central position of catcher during their playing days, including Yogi Berra, Bruce Bochy, Joe Girardi, Mike Scioscia, Joe Torre, and Ned Yost.

Steve Yeager

Scioscia was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1st round (19th overall pick) of the 1976 amateur draft, debuting for the Dodgers in 1980 (replacing Steve Yeager) and went on to play 12 years for the team.
Yeager, who was backing up Mike Scioscia by that time, did not have overwhelming stats for the Series, as he went 4-for-14 (.286), but one of his hits was a double and two were home runs.

Joe Maddon

Joe Maddon.
After spending several years as a coach in the Dodgers' organization, Scioscia was hired by new Angels general manager Bill Stoneman to be the Angels' manager after the 1999 season, following the late-season resignation of Terry Collins and interim managerial tenure of Joe Maddon.
Maddon began his coaching career in MLB with the California Angels in 1993 and served under managers Buck Rodgers, Marcel Lachemann, John McNamara, Terry Collins, and Mike Scioscia.

Fernando Valenzuela

ValenzuelaFernandoFernando '''Valenzuela
Scioscia immediately made himself invaluable to the Dodgers by making the effort to learn Spanish in order to better communicate with rookie sensation Fernando Valenzuela in 1981.
According to teammate Mike Scioscia, Fernando and many Dodger players watched Stewart, who was a former Dodger, throw the no-hitter on TV. Afterward, before his game, Fernando said to his teammates, "You just saw a no-hitter on TV, now you will see one in person."

1988 National League Championship Series

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Scioscia also hit a dramatic, ninth inning, game-tying home run off the New York Mets' Dwight Gooden in Game 4 of the 1988 National League Championship Series.
Shelby's throw to the plate was a little off target, and McReynolds scored the winning run by bowling over catcher Mike Scioscia as the ball sailed past him.

Dwight Gooden

GoodenDwight "Doc" GoodenDoc Gooden
Scioscia also hit a dramatic, ninth inning, game-tying home run off the New York Mets' Dwight Gooden in Game 4 of the 1988 National League Championship Series.
But he allowed a game-tying home run to Mike Scioscia, and the Dodgers eventually went on to win the game in 12 innings, and the series as well, 4 games to 3.

2002 World Series

2002World SeriesWorld Series championship
Under the leadership of Stoneman and Scioscia, the Angels ended their 16-year playoff drought in 2002, winning the AL Wild Card and ultimately winning the franchise's first World Series, a series that pitted the Angels against a San Francisco Giants team managed by Scioscia's former Dodgers teammate Dusty Baker.
The managers of the two clubs, Mike Scioscia of the Angels and Dusty Baker of the Giants, were teammates on the Dodgers from 1980–1983, and won a World Series in.

1999 Major League Baseball season

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After his playing career ended, Scioscia spent several seasons as a minor league manager and major league coach in the Dodgers organization before being hired as the Angels manager after the 1999 season.
November 17 – The Angels hire Mike Scioscia as their new manager.

Dusty Baker

Under the leadership of Stoneman and Scioscia, the Angels ended their 16-year playoff drought in 2002, winning the AL Wild Card and ultimately winning the franchise's first World Series, a series that pitted the Angels against a San Francisco Giants team managed by Scioscia's former Dodgers teammate Dusty Baker.
In 2002, his Giants gained the wild-card berth and from there advanced to the World Series, where they lost in seven games to the Anaheim Angels, who were managed by his former Dodger teammate, Mike Scioscia.

Baseball America

Baseball America'' Organization of the YearBaseball America'' Major League Executive of the YearBaseball America awards
He was further named the overall Major League 2002 Manager of the Year by Baseball America.
– Mike Scioscia, Los Angeles Angels

Homer at the Bat

In addition to his more orthodox work in baseball, Scioscia is also notable for a guest appearance as himself on The Simpsons episode "Homer at the Bat" in 1992, while he was still a player.
Roger Clemens, Wade Boggs, Ken Griffey, Jr., Steve Sax, Ozzie Smith, José Canseco, Don Mattingly, Darryl Strawberry and Mike Scioscia all guest starred as themselves, playing the ringers hired by Mr. Burns.

MoneyBart

Scioscia made a second appearance on The Simpsons with the episode "MoneyBart", which premiered on October 10, 2010.
Mike Scioscia, manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, pops up in the seats behind Marge and Bart and tells him that the best players listen to their managers, pointing out his three World Series wins — two as player, one as manager.

Bill Stoneman

Stoneman
After spending several years as a coach in the Dodgers' organization, Scioscia was hired by new Angels general manager Bill Stoneman to be the Angels' manager after the 1999 season, following the late-season resignation of Terry Collins and interim managerial tenure of Joe Maddon.
He hired Mike Scioscia as the club's manager and presided over its American League title and World Series championship and the team's ownership transition from the Walt Disney Company to Arturo Moreno.

List of Major League Baseball managers by wins

managerial winsMLB all-time managerial wins2,040 in the regular season
List of Major League Baseball managers by wins

Jerry Dipoto

DiPoto
A rift developed between Scioscia and Jerry Dipoto, the Angels' general manager, when Dipoto fired Mickey Hatcher from the role of the team's hitting coach in 2012.
However, Dipoto and manager Mike Scioscia disagreed regarding the use of analytics in baseball decisions, and a rift developed between the two when Dipoto fired Mickey Hatcher from the role of the team's hitting coach.

2002 Anaheim Angels season

Anaheim Angels2002Anaheim
Under the leadership of Stoneman and Scioscia, the Angels ended their 16-year playoff drought in 2002, winning the AL Wild Card and ultimately winning the franchise's first World Series, a series that pitted the Angels against a San Francisco Giants team managed by Scioscia's former Dodgers teammate Dusty Baker.
Mike Scioscia

Mickey Hatcher

Hatcher
A rift developed between Scioscia and Jerry Dipoto, the Angels' general manager, when Dipoto fired Mickey Hatcher from the role of the team's hitting coach in 2012.
In 2000, he became the hitting coach for the Los Angeles Angels, under manager Mike Scioscia, Hatcher's teammate from the 1988 World Championship team.

Major League Baseball Manager of the Year Award

Manager of the YearMOYManager of the Year Award
Scioscia was honored with the American League Manager of the Year Award in and.