Mikkyō

Mikkyoesoteric Buddhismesoteric Buddhist teachingsmystical and esotericTantric
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.wikipedia
45 Related Articles

Vajrayana

Vajrayana BuddhismTantric Buddhismtantric
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.
In Tibet, Buddhist Tantra is termed Vajrayāna, while in China it is generally known as Tángmì Hanmi 漢密 (唐密, "Chinese Esotericism") or Mìzōng (密宗, "Esoteric Sect"), in Pali it is known as Pyitsayãna, and in Japan it is known as Mikkyō (密教, "secret teachings").

Tendai

Tendai BuddhismTendai schoolTendai sect
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.
However, what Saichō transmitted from China was not exclusively Tiantai, but also included Zen, the esoteric Mikkyō, and Vinaya School elements.

Shugendō

ShugendoAscetic PracticesBuddhist
There are also Shingon and Tendai influenced practices of Shugendō.

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.

Shingon Buddhism

ShingonShingon BuddhistShingon sect
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.

Kegon

Kegon schoolHua-yen
Mikkyō is a Japanese term for the Vajrayana practices of Shingon Buddhism and the related practices that make up part of the Tendai and Kegon schools.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The collection of teachings and practices that eventually came to be known as Mikkyō had its early beginnings in the esoteric traditions of India and China.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
The collection of teachings and practices that eventually came to be known as Mikkyō had its early beginnings in the esoteric traditions of India and China.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
However, in the early 9th century the formative concepts which would become the core of "mainstream" Mikkyo—Shingon and Tendai—were brought to Japan, initially by the monks Kūkai (the founder of Shingon) and Saichō (the founder of Tendai), both of whom had traveled to China to study.

Kūkai

KukaiKōbō DaishiKōbō-Daishi
However, in the early 9th century the formative concepts which would become the core of "mainstream" Mikkyo—Shingon and Tendai—were brought to Japan, initially by the monks Kūkai (the founder of Shingon) and Saichō (the founder of Tendai), both of whom had traveled to China to study.

Saichō

SaichoDengyō DaishiDengyo
However, in the early 9th century the formative concepts which would become the core of "mainstream" Mikkyo—Shingon and Tendai—were brought to Japan, initially by the monks Kūkai (the founder of Shingon) and Saichō (the founder of Tendai), both of whom had traveled to China to study.

Tang dynasty

TangTang ChinaTang Empire
To these initial doctrines and beliefs were later added teachings concerning the powers of mysticism, magic and healing that had gradually begun to reach Japan with the arrival of itinerant monks, priests, hermits and shamanic practitioners, forced to flee from China after the fall of the Tang dynasty.

Shinto

ShintoismShintōShintoist
Blending easily with elements of Shinto practice and the pre-Buddhist folk traditions of sangaku-shinkō ("spiritual practices connected with sacred mountains"), these imported teachings, combining Chinese Esoteric Buddhism, Onmyōdō, Taoism and, at a later date, Tibetan Buddhism, evolved to become the esoteric Japanese tradition that is Mikkyō.

Chinese Esoteric Buddhism

TangmiChinese EsotericChinese Esoteric Buddhist
Blending easily with elements of Shinto practice and the pre-Buddhist folk traditions of sangaku-shinkō ("spiritual practices connected with sacred mountains"), these imported teachings, combining Chinese Esoteric Buddhism, Onmyōdō, Taoism and, at a later date, Tibetan Buddhism, evolved to become the esoteric Japanese tradition that is Mikkyō.

Onmyōdō

onmyojionmyōjionmyodo
Blending easily with elements of Shinto practice and the pre-Buddhist folk traditions of sangaku-shinkō ("spiritual practices connected with sacred mountains"), these imported teachings, combining Chinese Esoteric Buddhism, Onmyōdō, Taoism and, at a later date, Tibetan Buddhism, evolved to become the esoteric Japanese tradition that is Mikkyō.

Taoism

TaoistDaoistDaoism
Blending easily with elements of Shinto practice and the pre-Buddhist folk traditions of sangaku-shinkō ("spiritual practices connected with sacred mountains"), these imported teachings, combining Chinese Esoteric Buddhism, Onmyōdō, Taoism and, at a later date, Tibetan Buddhism, evolved to become the esoteric Japanese tradition that is Mikkyō.

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan BuddhistTibetanTibetan Buddhists
Blending easily with elements of Shinto practice and the pre-Buddhist folk traditions of sangaku-shinkō ("spiritual practices connected with sacred mountains"), these imported teachings, combining Chinese Esoteric Buddhism, Onmyōdō, Taoism and, at a later date, Tibetan Buddhism, evolved to become the esoteric Japanese tradition that is Mikkyō.

Tachikawa-ryu

Tachikawa-ryu is a Japanese school of Mikkyō (esotericism) of Shingon Buddhism founded in 1114 by the monk Ninkan (1057-1123) in an attempt to create a Japanese tradition corresponding to Indian tantra (Sanskrit Vāmācāra).

Ninjas in popular culture

ninjutsuNinja in popular cultureninja
The mudrā, a series of hand symbols representing different Buddhas, was applied to the kuji by Buddhists, possibly through the esoteric Mikkyō teachings.

Kuji-in

Kuji-Goshin-HoKuji-hihōNine Syllable Seals
The mantras are referred to as kuji, which literally translates as nine characters The syllables used in kuji are numerous, especially within Japanese esoteric Mikkyō.

Japanese philosophy

Japanese philosopherJapaneseJapanese philosophers
When the Heian period (794–1185) began, in substitution for the "making a country safe thought", form of esoteric Buddhism collectively known as mikkyō became widespread.

Shikoku Pilgrimage

Shikoku 88 temple pilgrimage88 Templespilgrimage route
Kūkai, born at Zentsū-ji (Temple 75) in 774, studied in China, and upon his return was influential in the promotion of esoteric Buddhism.

Dainichi Nyorai (Enjō-ji)

Dainichi Nyorai at Enjō-ji
As opposed to the "revealed teaching", understandable to the intellect of the common man, the "concealed teaching" (mikkyō) of Esoteric Buddhism offers Buddhahood and paradise on earth to the initiate, through ritual practice and the contemplation of sacred images.

Honzon

main imagemain objects of veneration
In Mikkyō practices such as in Shingon Buddhism, the term refers to the divinity honored in a rite.When Kūkai introduced Shingon Esoteric Buddhism and its Buddhist Pantheon to Japan in the 9th century, the statuary worship practices found in China were incorporated.