Miletus

MilesianMiletosMilesiansMiletMiletianMiletians Milesian Milesian GreeksAnactoriaAnactorians
Miletus (Hittite transcription Millawanda or Milawata (exonyms); Miletus; Milet) was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander River in ancient Caria.wikipedia
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Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
Its ruins are located near the modern village of Balat in Aydın Province, Turkey.
Numerous important cities were founded by these colonists, such as Miletus, Ephesus, Smyrna (now İzmir) and Byzantium (now Istanbul), the latter founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 657 BC.

Caria

ancient CariaKaruwaKingdom of Caria
Miletus (Hittite transcription Millawanda or Milawata (exonyms); Miletus; Milet) was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander River in ancient Caria.
Coastal Caria begins with Didyma south of Miletus, but Miletus had been placed in the pre-Greek Caria.

Thales of Miletus

ThalesThalisThales Avionics
In the 6th century BC, Miletus was the site of origin of the Greek philosophical (and scientific) tradition, when Thales, followed by Anaximander and Anaximenes (known collectively, to modern scholars, as the Milesian School) began to speculate about the material constitution of the world, and to propose speculative naturalistic (as opposed to traditional, supernatural) explanations for various natural phenomena.
undefined 624/623 – c. 548/545 BC) was a Greek mathematician, astronomer and pre-Socratic philosopher from Miletus in Ionia, Asia Minor.

Anaximander

Anaximander of MiletusAnaximandrosἈναξίμανδρος
In the 6th century BC, Miletus was the site of origin of the Greek philosophical (and scientific) tradition, when Thales, followed by Anaximander and Anaximenes (known collectively, to modern scholars, as the Milesian School) began to speculate about the material constitution of the world, and to propose speculative naturalistic (as opposed to traditional, supernatural) explanations for various natural phenomena.
610 BC), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher who lived in Miletus, a city of Ionia (in modern-day Turkey).

Priene

SampsonTheatre of Priene
In antiquity the city possessed a Harbor at the southern entry of a large bay, on which two more of the traditional twelve Ionian cities stood: Priene and Myus.
Priene (Prien) was an ancient Greek city of Ionia (and member of the Ionian League) at the base of an escarpment of Mycale, about 6 km north of the then course of the Maeander (now called the Büyük Menderes or "Big Maeander") River, 67 km from ancient Anthea, 15 km from ancient Aneon and 25 km from ancient Miletus.

Achaemenid Empire

AchaemenidPersianPersian Empire
Before the Persian invasion in the middle of the 6th century BC, Miletus was considered the greatest and wealthiest of Greek cities.
In 499 BC, the then tyrant of Miletus, Aristagoras, launched a joint expedition with the Persian satrap Artaphernes to conquer Naxos, in an attempt to bolster his position in Miletus (both financially and in terms of prestige).

Milesian school

MilesianMilesian philosophershis successors
In the 6th century BC, Miletus was the site of origin of the Greek philosophical (and scientific) tradition, when Thales, followed by Anaximander and Anaximenes (known collectively, to modern scholars, as the Milesian School) began to speculate about the material constitution of the world, and to propose speculative naturalistic (as opposed to traditional, supernatural) explanations for various natural phenomena.
The ideas associated with it are exemplified by three philosophers from the Ionian town of Miletus, on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor: Thales, Anaximander, and Anaximenes.

Beşparmak Mountains

LatmusMount LatrosMount Latmus
Pollen in core samples from Lake Bafa in the Latmus region inland of Miletus suggests that a lightly grazed climax forest prevailed in the Maeander valley, otherwise untenanted.
The city of Latmus, located on the south slopes of Mount Latmus 25 km east of Miletus, was originally a port on the narrow gulf, as reported by Strabo.

Aydın Province

AydınAydin ProvinceAydin
Its ruins are located near the modern village of Balat in Aydın Province, Turkey.
Kuşadası is near to the Dilek Peninsula - Büyük Menderes Delta National Park, while Didim has a temple of Apollo, beaches, and the ancient ruins of Miletos nearby.

Büyük Menderes River

MaeanderMaeander RiverBüyük Menderes
Miletus (Hittite transcription Millawanda or Milawata (exonyms); Miletus; Milet) was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander River in ancient Caria. Pollen in core samples from Lake Bafa in the Latmus region inland of Miletus suggests that a lightly grazed climax forest prevailed in the Maeander valley, otherwise untenanted.
It rises in west central Turkey near Dinar before flowing west through the Büyük Menderes graben until reaching the Aegean Sea in the proximity of the ancient Ionian city Miletus.

Balat, Didim

Balat
Its ruins are located near the modern village of Balat in Aydın Province, Turkey.
The ruins of the ancient Greek city of Miletus are near the village.

Anaximenes of Miletus

Anaximenes Anaximenes
In the 6th century BC, Miletus was the site of origin of the Greek philosophical (and scientific) tradition, when Thales, followed by Anaximander and Anaximenes (known collectively, to modern scholars, as the Milesian School) began to speculate about the material constitution of the world, and to propose speculative naturalistic (as opposed to traditional, supernatural) explanations for various natural phenomena.
Anaximenes was the last known Milesian philosopher, as Miletus was captured by the Persian army in 494 BC.

Leleges

Lelegianhumans born from stonesLelege
Legend has it that an influx of Cretans occurred displacing the indigenous Leleges.
Pherecydes of Leros (ca 480 BC) attributed to the Leleges the coast land of Caria, from Ephesus to Phocaea, with the islands of Samos and Chios, placing the true Carians farther south from Ephesus to Miletus.

Ionian League

Ionian dodecapolistwelve
The Greek Dark Ages were a time of Ionian settlement and consolidation in an alliance called the Ionian League. The city of Miletus became one of the twelve Ionian cities of Asia Minor.

Archaic Greece

ArchaicArchaic periodArchaic Greek
The Archaic Period of Greece began with a sudden and brilliant flash of art and philosophy on the coast of Anatolia.
The dominant coloniser in these parts was Miletus.

Greco-Persian Wars

Persian WarsPersian WarGreco-Persian War
This is the mythical commencement of the enduring alliance between Athens and Miletus, which played an important role in the subsequent Persian Wars.
In 499 BC, the tyrant of Miletus, Aristagoras, embarked on an expedition to conquer the island of Naxos, with Persian support; however, the expedition was a debacle and, preempting his dismissal, Aristagoras incited all of Hellenic Asia Minor into rebellion against the Persians.

Greek Dark Ages

Greek Dark AgeDark AgeDark Ages
The Greek Dark Ages were a time of Ionian settlement and consolidation in an alliance called the Ionian League.
The distribution of the Ionic Greek dialect in historic times indicates early movement from the mainland of Greece to the Anatolian coast to such sites as Miletus, Ephesus, and Colophon, perhaps as early as 1000, but the contemporaneous evidence is scant.

Didyma

BranchidaeTemple of ApolloTemple of Apollo at Didyma
Miletus had her own oracle of Apollo Didymeus Milesios in Didyma.
Didyma was an ancient Greek sanctuary on the coast of Ionia in the domain of the famous city of Miletus.

Milawata letter

Miletus is then mentioned in the "Tawagalawa letter", part of a series including the Manapa-Tarhunta letter and the Milawata letter, all of which are less securely dated.
Millawanda and Milawata are accepted as ancient names for Miletus.

Ionia

ancient IoniaIonicIonian
The city of Miletus became one of the twelve Ionian cities of Asia Minor.
Ionia proper comprised a narrow coastal strip from Phocaea in the north near the mouth of the river Hermus (now the Gediz), to Miletus in the south near the mouth of the river Maeander, and included the islands of Chios and Samos.

Carians

CarianCarian mercenariesCaria
The Late Bronze Age, 13th century BC, saw the arrival of Luwian language speakers from south central Anatolia calling themselves the Carians.
On Mount Latmos near Miletus, the Carians worshipped Endymion, who was the lover of the Moon and fathered fifty children.

Aristagoras

In 499 BC Miletus's tyrant Aristagoras became the leader of the Ionian Revolt against the Persians under Darius the Great, who quashed this rebellion and punished Miletus by selling all of the women and children into slavery, killing the men, and expelling all of the young men as eunuchs, thereby assuring that no Miletus citizen would ever be born again.
Aristagoras, d. 497/496 BC, was the leader of the Ionian city of Miletus in the late 6th century BC and early 5th century BC and a key player during the early years of the Ionian Revolt against the Persian Achaemenid Empire.

Mycenaean Greece

MycenaeanMycenaean civilizationMycenaean period
The Tawagalawa letter notes that Milawata had a governor, Atpa, who was under the jurisdiction of Ahhiyawa (a growing state probably in LHIIIB Mycenaean Greece); and that the town of Atriya was under Milesian jurisdiction.
In the early 15th century BC, commerce intensified with Mycenaean pottery reaching the western coast of Asia Minor, including Miletus and Troy, Cyprus, Lebanon, Palestine and Egypt.

Myus

Myos
In antiquity the city possessed a Harbor at the southern entry of a large bay, on which two more of the traditional twelve Ionian cities stood: Priene and Myus.
Instigated by Aristagoras of Miletus, the Ionian Revolt broke out here.

List of ancient Milesians

MilesianMilesiansGreeks
During this time several other cities were formed by Milesian settlers, spanning across what is now Turkey and even as far as Crimea.
The Milesians were the inhabitants of Miletus, an ancient Greek city in Anatolia, modern-day Turkey, near the coast of the Mediterranean Sea and at the mouth of the Meander River.