Military glider

glidergliderstransport gliderassault gliderglider-bornemilitary glidersgliderbornemilitarymilitary training glidermilitary transport glider
Military gliders (an offshoot of common gliders) have been used by the military of various countries for carrying troops (glider infantry) and heavy equipment to a combat zone, mainly during the Second World War.wikipedia
405 Related Articles

Glider infantry

Glider-borne infantryglider troopsglider-borne
Military gliders (an offshoot of common gliders) have been used by the military of various countries for carrying troops (glider infantry) and heavy equipment to a combat zone, mainly during the Second World War.
Glider infantry (also referred to as airlanding infantry esp. in British usage) was a type of airborne infantry in which soldiers and their equipment were inserted into enemy-controlled territory via military glider rather than parachute.

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

C-47Douglas DakotaDakota
These engineless aircraft were towed into the air and most of the way to their target by military transport planes, e.g., C-47 Skytrain or Dakota, or bombers relegated to secondary activities, e.g., Short Stirling.
The C-47 differed from the civilian DC-3 in numerous modifications, including being fitted with a cargo door, hoist attachment, and strengthened floor, along with a shortened tail cone for glider-towing shackles, and an astrodome in the cabin roof.

Antonov A-40

A-40KT/Antonov A-40
The Soviets also experimented with ways to deliver light tanks by air, including the Antonov A-40, a gliding tank with detachable wings.
Instead of loading light tanks onto gliders, as other nations had done, Soviet airborne forces had strapped T-27 tankettes underneath heavy bombers and landed them on airfields.

Gotha Go 242

Development then began of even larger gliders such as the Gotha Go 242 (23 trooper) and Messerschmitt Me 321 (130 trooper) to transport heavy armaments in anticipation of Operation Sea Lion and Operation Barbarossa.
The Gotha Go 242 was a transport glider used by the Luftwaffe during World War II.

DFS 230

DFS-230
Development of a troop-carrying glider was assigned to Hans Jacobs of the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug to develop the DFS 230 which could carry 9–10 fully equipped troops or 1,200 kg (2,800 pounds). The Germans were the first to use gliders in warfare, most famously during the assault of the Eben Emael fortress and the capture of the bridges over the Albert Canal at Veldwezelt, Vroenhoven and Kanne on May 10, 1940 in which 41 DFS 230 gliders carrying 10 soldiers each were launched behind Junkers Ju 52s.
The DFS 230 was a German transport glider operated by the Luftwaffe in World War II.

Messerschmitt Me 321

Me 321crash of a Luftwaffe Me-321 Gigant glider and its three Bf-110 tow planesMe 321 ''Gigant
Development then began of even larger gliders such as the Gotha Go 242 (23 trooper) and Messerschmitt Me 321 (130 trooper) to transport heavy armaments in anticipation of Operation Sea Lion and Operation Barbarossa.
The Messerschmitt Me 321 Gigant was a large German cargo glider developed and used during World War II.

Kurt Student

StudentGeneral StudentMajor-General Kurt von Student
Luftwaffe Colonel Kurt Student visited Moscow as part of the military collaboration programme with the Soviet Union.
He became involved in military gliders, since gliding was not forbidden by the Treaty of Versailles.

Battle of Fort Eben-Emael

Fort Eben-Emaeldramatic assaultAlbert Canal
The Germans were the first to use gliders in warfare, most famously during the assault of the Eben Emael fortress and the capture of the bridges over the Albert Canal at Veldwezelt, Vroenhoven and Kanne on May 10, 1940 in which 41 DFS 230 gliders carrying 10 soldiers each were launched behind Junkers Ju 52s.
The battle was a strategic victory for the German forces, with the airborne troops landing on top of the fortress with gliders and using explosives and flamethrowers to disable the outer defences of the fortress.

Light Tank Mk VII Tetrarch

TetrarchTetrarch light tankLight Tank Mark VII Tetrarch
Larger gliders were developed to land heavy equipment like anti-tank guns, anti-aircraft guns, small vehicles, such as jeeps, and also light tanks (e.g., the Tetrarch tank).
When selecting the equipment for the airborne forces, officials at the War Office concluded that gliders would be an integral component; gliders would transport troops and heavy equipment, which, by 1941, was to include artillery and some form of tank.

Junkers Ju 322

Ju 322 ''MammutJunkers Ju 322 "''MammutJunkers Ju 322 ''Mammut'' ("Mammoth")
The Junkers Ju 322 Mammut ("Mammoth") was the largest such glider ever built, but it was never used operationally.
The Junkers Ju 322 Mammut (Mammoth) was a heavy transport military glider, resembling a giant flying wing, proposed for use by the Luftwaffe in World War II; only two prototypes were completed, a further 98 were scrapped before completion.

Airspeed Horsa

HorsaHorsa glidersHorsa glider
Among the types developed were the 28 trooper Airspeed Horsa and the 7-ton capacity General Aircraft Hamilcar cargo glider.
The Airspeed AS.51 Horsa was a British troop-carrying glider used during the Second World War.

General Aircraft Hamilcar

HamilcarHamilcar XGAL.49 Hamilcar
Among the types developed were the 28 trooper Airspeed Horsa and the 7-ton capacity General Aircraft Hamilcar cargo glider.
49 Hamilcar or Hamilcar Mark I''' was a large British military glider produced during the Second World War, which was designed to carry heavy cargo, such as the Tetrarch or M22 Locust light tank.

Blohm & Voss BV 40

BV 40
The Blohm & Voss BV 40 was a German glider fighter designed to attack Allied bomber formations but was not used.
The Blohm & Voss BV 40 was a German glider fighter designed to attack Allied bomber formations during the time of the bombing raids over Nazi Germany.

General Aircraft Hotspur

HotspurGeneral Aircraft Hotspur IGAL.48 Hotspur
The General Aircraft Hotspur – originally planned as a compact assault glider carrying a small number of troops – was used for training the British Army pilots who formed the Glider Pilot Regiment.
The General Aircraft GAL.48 Hotspur was a military glider designed and built by the British company General Aircraft Ltd during World War II.

Battle of Crete

Creteinvasion of Creteevacuation of Crete
(Fortuitously, the British were able to demolish the bridge a few hours later.) Next, General Student then convinced Hitler that Crete could be captured using only airborne troops.
This was to be the first big airborne invasion, although the Germans had made smaller parachute and glider-borne assaults in the invasions of Denmark and Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, France and mainland Greece.

Slingsby Hengist

Hengist
The Slingsby Hengist was a backup design which was not required when the similar capacity American-built Waco CG-4 (given the British service name "Hadrian") became available in large numbers through lend-lease.
The Slingsby Hengist was a British military glider designed and built by Slingsby Sailplanes Ltd.

Operation Freshman

FreshmanOperation ''Freshman
The most famous British actions using gliders were the unsuccessful Operation Freshman against a German heavy water plant in Norway in 1942, the taking of the Pegasus Bridge in a coup-de-main operation (Operation Deadstick) at the very start of the invasion of Normandy, Operation Dragoon (the invasion of southern France), Operation Market Garden (the landing at Arnhem Bridge to try and seize a bridgehead over the lower Rhine) and Operation Varsity (Crossing of the Rhine).
It was the first British airborne operation conducted using Airspeed Horsa gliders, and its target was the Vemork Norsk Hydro chemical plant in Telemark, Norway which produced heavy water for Nazi Germany.

Glider Pilot Regiment

glider pilotsglider pilotGlider Pilot Squadron
The General Aircraft Hotspur – originally planned as a compact assault glider carrying a small number of troops – was used for training the British Army pilots who formed the Glider Pilot Regiment.
The Glider Pilot Regiment was a British airborne forces unit of the Second World War, which was responsible for crewing the British Army's military gliders and saw action in the European theatre in support of Allied airborne operations.

Junkers Ju 52

Ju 52Junkers Ju 52/3mJunkers Ju 52/3mge
The Germans were the first to use gliders in warfare, most famously during the assault of the Eben Emael fortress and the capture of the bridges over the Albert Canal at Veldwezelt, Vroenhoven and Kanne on May 10, 1940 in which 41 DFS 230 gliders carrying 10 soldiers each were launched behind Junkers Ju 52s.
A tow coupling was built into the tail-skid for use in towing freight gliders.

Invasion of Normandy

NormandyNormandy invasionBattle of Normandy
The most famous British actions using gliders were the unsuccessful Operation Freshman against a German heavy water plant in Norway in 1942, the taking of the Pegasus Bridge in a coup-de-main operation (Operation Deadstick) at the very start of the invasion of Normandy, Operation Dragoon (the invasion of southern France), Operation Market Garden (the landing at Arnhem Bridge to try and seize a bridgehead over the lower Rhine) and Operation Varsity (Crossing of the Rhine).
The Normandy invasion began with overnight parachute and glider landings, massive air attacks and naval bombardments.

Short Stirling

StirlingStirlingsShort Stirling III
These engineless aircraft were towed into the air and most of the way to their target by military transport planes, e.g., C-47 Skytrain or Dakota, or bombers relegated to secondary activities, e.g., Short Stirling.
During 1943, it had been recognised that there would be a requirement for a force of powerful aircraft capable of towing heavy transport gliders, such as the General Aircraft Hamilcar and Airspeed Horsa, it was found that the Stirling would fit this role admirably.

Waco CG-4

Waco CG-4AHadrianCG-4A
Only Waco Aircraft Company was able to deliver the experimental glider prototypes that satisfied the requirements of Materiel Command, the eight-seat Waco CG-3 (modified to become a production nine-seat glider) and the fifteen-seat Waco CG-4.
The Waco CG-4A was the most widely used American troop/cargo military glider of World War II.

Waco Aircraft Company

WacoWaco AircraftAdvance Aircraft Company
Eleven companies were invited to participate in the experimental glider program, but only four responded with any interest, Frankfort Sailplane Company (XCG-1, XCG-2), Waco Aircraft Company (XCG-3, XCG-4), St. Louis Aircraft Corp. (XCG-5, XCG-6), and Bowlus Sailplanes (XCG-7, XCG-8).
During World War II, Waco produced large numbers of military gliders for the RAF and US Army Air Forces for airborne operations, especially during the Normandy Invasion and Operation Market Garden.

Waco CG-3

CG-3
Only Waco Aircraft Company was able to deliver the experimental glider prototypes that satisfied the requirements of Materiel Command, the eight-seat Waco CG-3 (modified to become a production nine-seat glider) and the fifteen-seat Waco CG-4.
The Waco CG-3A was a US light troop military glider of World War II.

Operation Market Garden

airborne attack on the NetherlandsMarket Gardenairborne invasion of the Netherlands
The most famous British actions using gliders were the unsuccessful Operation Freshman against a German heavy water plant in Norway in 1942, the taking of the Pegasus Bridge in a coup-de-main operation (Operation Deadstick) at the very start of the invasion of Normandy, Operation Dragoon (the invasion of southern France), Operation Market Garden (the landing at Arnhem Bridge to try and seize a bridgehead over the lower Rhine) and Operation Varsity (Crossing of the Rhine).
14,589 troops were landed by glider and 20,011 by parachute.