A report on Obscenity and Miller test

Cover of an undated American edition of Fanny Hill, c. 1910
The 18th century book Fanny Hill has been subject to obscenity trials at various times (image: plate XI: The bathing party; La baignade)

The Miller test, also called the three-prong obscenity test, is the United States Supreme Court's test for determining whether speech or expression can be labeled obscene, in which case it is not protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and can be prohibited.

- Miller test

In the United States, the 1973 ruling of the Supreme Court of the United States in Miller v. California established a three-tiered test to determine what was obscene—and thus not protected, versus what was merely erotic and thus protected by the First Amendment.

- Obscenity
Cover of an undated American edition of Fanny Hill, c. 1910

1 related topic with Alpha

Overall

Patently offensive

0 links

Patently offensive is a term used in United States law regarding obscenity under the First Amendment.

The Roth standard was largely replaced by the Miller test established by Miller v. California (1973).