Minangkabau people

MinangkabauMinangMinangkabausKerinciMinangkabau societyKerinci peopleAtap MinangkabauMinang cultureMinangkabau descendantsMinangkabau descent
Minangkabau people (Urang Minang), also known as Minang, are an ethnic group native to the Minangkabau Highlands of West Sumatra, Indonesia.wikipedia
567 Related Articles

West Sumatra

West SumateraMinangkabauEmblem of West Sumatra
Minangkabau people (Urang Minang), also known as Minang, are an ethnic group native to the Minangkabau Highlands of West Sumatra, Indonesia. Minangkabau are ethnic majority in West Sumatra and Negeri Sembilan.
West Sumatra is home to the Minangkabau people, although the traditional Minangkabau region is actually wider than the current administrative region of the province of West Sumatra, covering up to the southern region of North Sumatra, the western region of Riau, the western region of Jambi and the northern region of Bengkulu.

Negeri Sembilan

Negri SembilanSungei UjongVisit Negeri Sembilan
Minangkabau are ethnic majority in West Sumatra and Negeri Sembilan.
The name is believed to derive from the nine (sembilan) villages or nagari in the Minangkabau language (now known as luak) settled by the Minangkabau, a people originally from West Sumatra (in present-day Indonesia).

Pagaruyung Kingdom

PagaruyungMalayapuraPagar Ruyung
The Minangkabau's West Sumatran homelands was the seat of the Pagaruyung Kingdom, believed by early orientalists to have been the cradle of the Malay race, and the location of the Padri War (1821 to 1837). Adityawarman, a follower of Tantric Buddhism with ties to the Singhasari and Majapahit kingdoms of Java, is believed to have founded a kingdom in the Minangkabau highlands at Pagaruyung and ruled between 1347 and 1375.
Pagaruyung (also Pagarruyung, Pagar Ruyung and, Malayapura or Malayupura) was the seat of the Minangkabau kings of Western Sumatra, though little is known about it.

Islam in West Sumatra

Islam in PariamanIslam in the Agam region of West SumatraIslam started to be adopted
It was around the 16th century that Islam started to be adopted by the Minangkabau.
Minangkabau people who are indigenous to West Sumatra and consist 88% of West Sumatran population today have historically played the important role within the Muslim community in Indonesia.

Padri War

PadriPadri movementDutch Invansion
The Minangkabau's West Sumatran homelands was the seat of the Pagaruyung Kingdom, believed by early orientalists to have been the cradle of the Malay race, and the location of the Padri War (1821 to 1837).
But after occupation of the Pagaruyung Kingdom by Tuanku Pasaman, one of Padri leaders in 1815, on 21 February 1821, the Minangkabau nobility made a deal with Dutch in Padang to help them to fight the Padris.

Pariaman

Priaman
The Dutch East India Company first acquired gold at Pariaman in 1651, but later moved south to Padang to avoid interference from the Acehnese occupiers.
According to the limited early sources available, by the sixteenth century Pariaman was an important port city serving the Minangkabau settlements in the interior highlands of central west Sumatra.

Adityawarman

AdityavarmanSrimat Sri Udayadityawarman Pratapaparakrama Rajendra Mauli Warmadewa
Adityawarman, a follower of Tantric Buddhism with ties to the Singhasari and Majapahit kingdoms of Java, is believed to have founded a kingdom in the Minangkabau highlands at Pagaruyung and ruled between 1347 and 1375.
Adityawarman then founded the royal dynasty of Minangkabau in Pagarruyung and presided over the central Sumatra region to take control of the gold trade between 1347 and 1375.

Majapahit

Majapahit EmpireMajapahit KingdomKing of Majapahit
Adityawarman, a follower of Tantric Buddhism with ties to the Singhasari and Majapahit kingdoms of Java, is believed to have founded a kingdom in the Minangkabau highlands at Pagaruyung and ruled between 1347 and 1375.
Gajah Mada's other renowned general was Adityawarman, known for his conquest in Minangkabau.

Minangkabau Highlands

MinangkabauMinangkabau regionMinangkabau lands
Minangkabau people (Urang Minang), also known as Minang, are an ethnic group native to the Minangkabau Highlands of West Sumatra, Indonesia.
It is home to the Minangkabau people who refer it as Alam Minangkabau, or "the world of Minangkabau".

Malay language

MalayBahasa MelayuMalay-language
The Minangkabau language is a member of the Austronesian language family, and is closest to the Malay language, though when the two languages split from a common ancestor and the precise historical relationship between Malay and Minangkabau culture is not known.
The laws were for the Minangkabau people, who today still live in the highlands of Sumatra.

Adat perpatih

The Bodi Caniago/Adat perpatih system formulated by Datuak Parpatiah nan Sabatang is based upon egalitarian principles with all panghulu (clan chiefs) being equal while the Koto Piliang /Adat Katumangguangan system is more autocratic with there being a hierarchy of panghulu.
It was found by a Minangkabau leader named Sutan Balun or more famously known as Dato Perpatih Nan Sebatang.

Tabuik

tabut
A Tabuik is the local manifestation of the Remembrance of Muharram among the Minangkabau people in the coastal regions of West Sumatra, Indonesia, particularly in the city of Pariaman.

Nagari (settlement)

nagarinagaris
The national government legislated to apply the Javanese desa village system throughout Indonesia, and in 1983 the traditional Minangkabau nagari village units were split into smaller jorong units, thereby destroying the traditional village social and cultural institutions.
A nagari is a semi-autonomous Minangkabau people regional administrative unit in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

Malay race

MalayMalaysMalayan
The Minangkabau's West Sumatran homelands was the seat of the Pagaruyung Kingdom, believed by early orientalists to have been the cradle of the Malay race, and the location of the Padri War (1821 to 1837).
After he mounted an expedition to the former Minangkabau seat of royalty in the Pagaruyung, he declared it was ‘the source of that power, the origin of that nation, so extensively scattered over the Eastern Archipelago’.

Painan

In 1663 the Dutch agreed to protect and liberate local villages from the Acehnese in return for a trading monopoly, and as a result setup trading posts at Painan and Padang.
According to the local folklore, the name 'Painan' is originated from paik nian, which means "very bitter" in bahasa Minangkabau, the language of the Minangkabau people who lives in the area.

Rendang

beef rendangchicken rendangRendang ayam
Rendang is a dish which is considered to be a characteristic of Minangkabau culture; it is cooked 4–5 times a year.
Rendang is an Indonesian spicy red meat dish originating from the Minangkabau people of Indonesia.

Rumah Gadang

MinangkabauMinangkabau traditional houseGadang House
Rumah gadang (Minangkabau: 'big house') or rumah bagonjong (Minangkabau: 'spired roof house') are the traditional homes of the Minangkabau.
Rumah gadang (Minangkabau: "big house") or rumah bagonjong "house for the Minangkabau people" (Minangkabau: "spired roof house") are the traditional homes ("rumah adat") of the Minangkabau in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

Silat

pesilatIndonesian martial arts, silatkontaw silat
At the surau during night time (after the Isyak prayers), these youngsters are taught the traditional Minankabau art of self-defence, which is Silek, or Silat in Malay.
Another legend tells of three Minangkabau warriors from West Sumatra, Indonesia.

Indonesia

Republic of IndonesiaIndonesianIndonesian Republic
Minangkabau people (Urang Minang), also known as Minang, are an ethnic group native to the Minangkabau Highlands of West Sumatra, Indonesia.
The Sundanese, Batak, Madurese, Minangkabau and Buginese are the next largest groups in the country.

Padang

Padang, IndonesiaIndaroengIndarung
The Dutch East India Company first acquired gold at Pariaman in 1651, but later moved south to Padang to avoid interference from the Acehnese occupiers. In 1663 the Dutch agreed to protect and liberate local villages from the Acehnese in return for a trading monopoly, and as a result setup trading posts at Painan and Padang.
The cuisine of the Minangkabau people is commonly called Padang cuisine.

Talempong

Caklempong
Traditional Minangkabau music includes saluang jo dendang which consists of singing to the accompaniment of a saluang bamboo flute, and talempong gong-chime music.
Talempong is a traditional music of the Minangkabau people of West Sumatra, Indonesia.

Surau

prayer room
As early as the age of 7, boys traditionally leave their homes and live in a surau (a prayer house and community centre) to learn religious and cultural (adat) teachings.
In Minangkabau society, they continued pre-Islamic traditions of a men's house where veneration of the dead occurred, and are built on high posts.

Minangkabau (legend)

MinangkabauMinangkabau legendvictors of the buffalo
They are also well distinguished by their rooflines which curve upward from the middle and end in points, in imitation of the upward-curving horns of the water buffalo that supposedly eked the people their name (i.e. "victors of the buffalo").
The Minangkabau legend told the story of the origin of the name "Minangkabau".

Minangkabau language

MinangkabauMinangNegeri Sembilan Malay
The Minangkabau language is a member of the Austronesian language family, and is closest to the Malay language, though when the two languages split from a common ancestor and the precise historical relationship between Malay and Minangkabau culture is not known. Rumah gadang (Minangkabau: 'big house') or rumah bagonjong (Minangkabau: 'spired roof house') are the traditional homes of the Minangkabau. The term Minangkabau (Minangkabau: Minang Jawi script: مينڠ) came from a popular legend that was derived from a territorial dispute between a people and a prince from a neighbouring region.
Minangkabau (Minangkabau: Baso Minang(kabau); Bahasa Minangkabau) is an Austronesian language spoken by the Minangkabau of West Sumatra, the western part of Riau, South Aceh Regency, the northern part of Bengkulu and Jambi, also in several cities throughout Indonesia by migrated Minangkabau.

Matrilineality

matrilinealmatrilinematrilineally
The Minangkabau are the largest matrilineal society in the world, with property, family name and land passing down from mother to daughter, while religious and political affairs are the responsibility of men, although some women also play important roles in these areas.
Examples include the Cherokee, Choctaw, Gitksan, Haida, Hopi, Iroquois, Lenape, Navajo and Tlingit of North America; the Kuna people of Panama; the Kogi and Carib of South America; the Minangkabau people of West Sumatra, Indonesia and Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia; the Trobrianders, Dobu and Nagovisi of Melanesia; the Nairs of Kerala and the Bunts and Billava of Karnataka in south India; the Khasi, Jaintia and Garo of Meghalaya in northeast India; the Ngalops and Sharchops of Bhutan; Muslims and the Tamils in eastern Sri Lanka; the Mosuo of China; the Kayah of Southeast Asia, the Basques of Spain and France; the Akan including the Ashanti of west Africa; virtually all groups across the so-called "matrilineal belt" of south-central Africa; the Tuareg of west and north Africa; the Serer of Senegal, The Gambia and Mauritania; and most Jewish communities.