Mine Safety and Health Administration

MSHAMining Safety and Health AdministrationU.S. Mine Safety and Health AdministrationAssistant Secretary of Labor (Mine Safety and Health)Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Healthfederal mine inspectorMine Safety & Health AdministrationMine Safety and HealthMine Safety and Heath AdministrationUnited States Mine Safety and Health Administration
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor which administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to enforce compliance with mandatory safety and health standards as a means to eliminate fatal accidents, to reduce the frequency and severity of nonfatal accidents, to minimize health hazards, and to promote improved safety and health conditions in the nation's mines.wikipedia
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David Zatezalo

David Zatezalo is Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, and the head of MSHA.
David George Zatezalo (born June 7, 1955) is a former American coal industry executive who currently serves as the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health where he heads the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

Coal mining

coal minecollierycoal miner
The Coal Mine Safety and Health division is divided into 12 districts covering coal mining in different portions of the United States.
To protect miners' hearing, the US Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) guidelines for noise place a Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for noise at 90 dBA time-weighted over 8 hours.

United States Department of Labor

U.S. Department of LaborDepartment of LaborUS Department of Labor
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor which administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to enforce compliance with mandatory safety and health standards as a means to eliminate fatal accidents, to reduce the frequency and severity of nonfatal accidents, to minimize health hazards, and to promote improved safety and health conditions in the nation's mines.

United States Bureau of Mines

U.S. Bureau of MinesBureau of MinesUS Bureau of Mines
In 1910, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior.
In 1977 Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act, which expanded the federal authority for health and safety regulation, and created a new agency, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).

Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969

Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety ActCoal Mine Safety and Health Act of 19691969 Coal Mine Safety and Health Act
The Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous federal legislation governing the mining industry.
The S. 2917 legislation created the Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration (MESA), later renamed the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), as well as a National Mine Map Repository, within the Department of the Interior.

Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration

In 1973, the Secretary of the Interior, through administrative action, created the Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration (MESA) as a new departmental agency separate from the Bureau of Mines.
The Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration (MESA) under the U.S. Department of the Interior was the predecessor of the Mine Safety and Health Administration, prior to March 9, 1978.

Mining

mineminescopper mine
MSHA carries out the mandates of the Mine Act at all mining and mineral processing operations in the United States, regardless of size, number of employees, commodity mined, or method of extraction.
The Mining Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) was established in 1978 to "work to prevent death, illness, and injury from mining and promote safe and healthful workplaces for US miners."

Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission

Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions.
Federal mine inspectors employed by the Department's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) enforce these regulations by issuing citations and orders to mine operators.

Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977

Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977Federal Mine Safety and Health ActFederal mine and health and safety act of 1977
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor which administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to enforce compliance with mandatory safety and health standards as a means to eliminate fatal accidents, to reduce the frequency and severity of nonfatal accidents, to minimize health hazards, and to promote improved safety and health conditions in the nation's mines.

American Mining Congress v. Mine Safety & Health Administration

In this case, a miners' organizations petitioned for review of Program Policy Letters (PPL) of Mine Safety and Health Administration, stating agency's position that certain x-ray readings qualified as diagnoses of lung disease within meaning of agency reporting regulations.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

NIOSHNational Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety
Additionally, the Mine Safety and Health Act authorizes the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to develop recommendations for mine health standards for the Mine Safety and Health Administration; administer a medical surveillance program for miners, including chest X-rays to detect pneumoconiosis (black lung disease) in coal miners; conduct on-site investigations in mines; and test and certify personal protective equipment and hazard-measurement instruments.
Also, pursuant to its authority granted to it by the Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, NIOSH may "develop recommendations for mine health standards for the Mine Safety and Health Administration", "administer a medical surveillance program for miners, including chest X‑rays to detect pneumoconiosis (black lung disease) in coal miners", "conduct on-site investigations in mines similar to those authorized for general industry under the Occupational Safety and Health Act; and "test and certify personal protective equipment and hazard-measurement instruments".

Through-the-earth mine communications

Through the earth mine communicationscave-linkcommunication within mines
Australian company Mine Site Technologies began the development of PED in 1987, and it became commercially available and Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) approved in 1991.

Occupational safety and health

health and safetyoccupational healthoccupational health and safety
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor which administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to enforce compliance with mandatory safety and health standards as a means to eliminate fatal accidents, to reduce the frequency and severity of nonfatal accidents, to minimize health hazards, and to promote improved safety and health conditions in the nation's mines.

Mining accident

mine disasteraccidentmining accidents
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor which administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to enforce compliance with mandatory safety and health standards as a means to eliminate fatal accidents, to reduce the frequency and severity of nonfatal accidents, to minimize health hazards, and to promote improved safety and health conditions in the nation's mines.

Mineral processing

ore dressingdressingmill
MSHA carries out the mandates of the Mine Act at all mining and mineral processing operations in the United States, regardless of size, number of employees, commodity mined, or method of extraction.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety.

Territories of the United States

territoriesU.S. territoriesterritory
The 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age.

Underground mine ventilation

ventilationmine ventilationventilated
The 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age.

United States Department of the Interior

Department of the InteriorU.S. Department of the InteriorInterior Department
In 1910, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior.

Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952

The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders.

Civil penalty

civil penaltiescivil fineadministrative penalties
The 1952 Act also authorized the assessment of civil penalties against mine operators for noncompliance with withdrawal orders or for refusing to give inspectors access to mine property, although no provision was made for monetary penalties for noncompliance with the safety provisions.

Surface mining

strip miningstrip minesurface mine
The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines.