Minister for Co-ordination of Defence

Minister for Coordination of Defence
The position of Minister for Coordination of Defence was a British Cabinet-level position established in 1936 to oversee and co-ordinate the rearmament of Britain's defences.wikipedia
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Thomas Inskip, 1st Viscount Caldecote

Thomas InskipSir Thomas InskipThe Viscount Caldecote
Despite this, Baldwin's choice of the Attorney General Sir Thomas Inskip provoked widespread astonishment.
Despite legal posts dominating his career for all but four years, he is most prominently remembered for serving as Minister for Coordination of Defence from 1936 until 1939.

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston ChurchillChurchillChurchill, Winston
This campaign had been led by Winston Churchill, and many expected him to be appointed as the new minister, though nearly every other senior figure in the National Government was also speculated upon by politicians and commentators.
But within weeks Churchill was passed over for the post of Minister for Co-ordination of Defence in favour of Attorney General Sir Thomas Inskip.

Ernle Chatfield, 1st Baron Chatfield

Ernle ChatfieldLord ChatfieldAlfred Ernle Montacute Chatfield
In 1939 Inskip was succeeded by First Sea Lord Lord Chatfield.
He subsequently served as Minister for Coordination of Defence in the early years of the Second World War.

Minister of Defence (United Kingdom)

Minister of DefenceMinister of DefenseBritish Minister of Defence
The following month Chamberlain was succeeded as Prime Minister by Churchill, who took the additional title of "Minister of Defence"; this was, however, a separate office from Minister for Coordination of Defence, though the two titles were frequently used interchangeably.
Prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, concerns about British forces being understrength led in 1936 to the creation of the post of Minister for Coordination of Defence by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.

Cabinet of the United Kingdom

CabinetBritish Cabinetcabinet minister
The position of Minister for Coordination of Defence was a British Cabinet-level position established in 1936 to oversee and co-ordinate the rearmament of Britain's defences.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleySir Stanley Baldwin
The position was established by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin in response to criticism that Britain's armed forces were understrength compared to Nazi Germany.

Nazi Germany

Third ReichGermanGermany
The position was established by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin in response to criticism that Britain's armed forces were understrength compared to Nazi Germany.

National Government (United Kingdom)

National GovernmentNationalNational Independent
This campaign had been led by Winston Churchill, and many expected him to be appointed as the new minister, though nearly every other senior figure in the National Government was also speculated upon by politicians and commentators.

Attorney General for England and Wales

Attorney GeneralAttorney-GeneralAttorney-General for England and Wales
Despite this, Baldwin's choice of the Attorney General Sir Thomas Inskip provoked widespread astonishment.

Caligula

GaiusEmperor CaligulaGaius Caligula
A famous remark was "This is the most cynical appointment since Caligula made his horse a consul".

First Sea Lord

First Naval LordSenior Naval LordFirst Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff
In 1939 Inskip was succeeded by First Sea Lord Lord Chatfield.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

Neville Chamberlain

ChamberlainNevilleArthur Neville Chamberlain
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

War cabinet

British War CabinetAustralian War CabinetWar Cabinet Office
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

Secretary of State for War

War SecretarySecretaries of State for WarWar Minister
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

First Lord of the Admiralty

First Lords of the AdmiraltyList of the First Lords of the AdmiraltyFirst Lord
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

Secretary of State for Air

President of the Air CouncilAirPresident of the Air Board
When the Second World War broke out, the new Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain formed a small War Cabinet, and it was expected that Chatfield would serve as a spokesperson for the three service ministers, the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty and the Secretary of State for Air; however political considerations resulted in all three posts being included in the Cabinet, and Chatfield's role proved increasingly redundant.

Fleet Air Arm

Royal Naval Air StationFAARoyal Navy Fleet Air Arm
On 24 May 1939 the Fleet Air Arm was returned to Admiralty control under the "Inskip Award" (named after the Minister for Co-ordination of Defence overseeing the British re-armament programme) and renamed the Air Branch of the Royal Navy.

Secretary of State for Defence

Defence SecretaryMinister of DefenceSec. of State
The position of Minister for Co-ordination of Defence was a British Cabinet-level position established in 1936 to oversee and co-ordinate the rearmament of Britain's defences.

Ministry of Defence (1947–64)

Ministry of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Defence
In 1936 the post of Minister for Co-ordination of Defence was established, though he did not have a department and the political heads of the three services—the First Lord of the Admiralty for the Royal Navy, the Secretary of State for War for the Army and the Secretary of State for Air for the Royal Air Force—continued to attend Cabinet.

Ministry of Defence (United Kingdom)

Ministry of DefenceMoDUK Ministry of Defence
As rearmament became a concern during the 1930s, Stanley Baldwin created the position of Minister for Co-ordination of Defence.

MAUD Committee

MAUD ReportMaud Reportsmorally unacceptable
Minister for Coordination of Defence checked with the Treasury and Foreign Office, and found that the Belgian Congo uranium was owned by the Union Minière du Haut Katanga company, whose British vice-president, Lord Stonehaven, arranged a meeting with the president of the company, Edgar Sengier.