Minister of Defence (United Kingdom)

Minister of DefenceMinister of DefenseBritish Minister of Defence
The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964.wikipedia
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Secretary of State for Defence

Defence SecretaryMinister of DefenceSec. of State
In 1964, the creation of a single, merged Ministry of Defence and the abolition of the separate service ministries in the UK led to the creation of the new post of Secretary of State for Defence, more popularly known as Defence Secretary.
It replaced the positions of First Lord of the Admiralty, Secretary of State for War, and Secretary of State for Air, as the Admiralty, War Office and Air Ministry were merged into the Ministry of Defence (the Secretary of State for War had already ceased to be a cabinet position in 1946, with the creation of the cabinet-level Minister of Defence).

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston ChurchillChurchillChurchill, Winston
On his appointment as Prime Minister in May 1940, Winston Churchill created for himself the new post of Minister of Defence.
In response to previous criticisms that there had been no clear single minister in charge of the prosecution of the war, Churchill created and took the additional position of Minister of Defence, making him the most powerful wartime prime minister in British history.

Harold Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis

Harold AlexanderSir Harold AlexanderThe Viscount Alexander of Tunis
After the end of his viceregal tenure, Alexander was sworn into the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and thereafter, in order to serve as the British Minister of Defence in the Cabinet of Winston Churchill, into the Imperial Privy Council.

Minister for Co-ordination of Defence

Minister for Coordination of Defence
Prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, concerns about British forces being understrength led in 1936 to the creation of the post of Minister for Coordination of Defence by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.
The following month Chamberlain was succeeded as Prime Minister by Churchill, who took the additional title of "Minister of Defence"; this was, however, a separate office from Minister for Coordination of Defence, though the two titles were frequently used interchangeably.

Harold Watkinson

Harold Arthur WatkinsonHarold Watkinson, 1st Viscount WatkinsonLord Watkinson
He was Minister of Transport and Civil Aviation between 1955 and 1959 and a cabinet member as Minister of Defence between 1959 and 1962, when he was sacked in the Night of the Long Knives.

Antony Head, 1st Viscount Head

Antony HeadAnthony HeadAnthony Head, 1st Viscount Head
He served as Secretary of State for War from 1951 to 1956 and as Minister of Defence (with a seat in the cabinet) from 1956 to 1957, in the administrations of Winston Churchill and Anthony Eden.

Duncan Sandys

Duncan Edwin Sandys The Right Honourable '''Duncan SandysCelia Sandys
He was appointed Minister of Defence in 1957 and quickly produced the 1957 Defence White Paper that proposed a radical shift in the Royal Air Force by ending the use of fighter aircraft in favour of missile technology.

Peter Thorneycroft

Lord ThorneycroftPeter Thorneycroft, Baron ThorneycroftThorneycroft
In 1962, he was promoted to be Minister of Defence.

Ministry of Defence (1947–64)

Ministry of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of DefenceParliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Defence
When Winston Churchill became Prime Minister in May 1940 he personally assumed responsibility for inter-service co-ordination, with the title of Minister of Defence, and the heads of the three services were not included in the War Cabinet.

Harold Macmillan

MacmillanHarold Macmillan, 1st Earl of StocktonMaurice Harold Macmillan

Cabinet of the United Kingdom

CabinetBritish Cabinetcabinet minister
The post was a Cabinet-level post and generally ranked above the three service ministers, some of whom, however, continued to also serve in Cabinet.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleySir Stanley Baldwin
Prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, concerns about British forces being understrength led in 1936 to the creation of the post of Minister for Coordination of Defence by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.

Neville Chamberlain

ChamberlainNevilleArthur Neville Chamberlain
The post was abolished by Baldwin's successor Neville Chamberlain in April 1940.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The post was created in response to previous criticism that there had been no clear single minister in charge of the prosecution of the war.

Secretary of State for War

War SecretarySecretaries of State for WarWar Minister
In 1946, the post became the only cabinet-level post representing the military, with the three service ministers—the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty, and the Secretary of State for Air—now formally subordinated to the Minister of Defence.

First Lord of the Admiralty

First Lords of the AdmiraltyList of the First Lords of the AdmiraltyFirst Lord
In 1946, the post became the only cabinet-level post representing the military, with the three service ministers—the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty, and the Secretary of State for Air—now formally subordinated to the Minister of Defence.

Secretary of State for Air

President of the Air CouncilAirPresident of the Air Board
In 1946, the post became the only cabinet-level post representing the military, with the three service ministers—the Secretary of State for War, the First Lord of the Admiralty, and the Secretary of State for Air—now formally subordinated to the Minister of Defence.

Ministry of Defence (United Kingdom)

Ministry of DefenceMoDUK Ministry of Defence
In 1964, the creation of a single, merged Ministry of Defence and the abolition of the separate service ministries in the UK led to the creation of the new post of Secretary of State for Defence, more popularly known as Defence Secretary.