Ministers of the New Zealand Government

ministersministerCabinet ministerministerialministerial portfoliosgovernment ministerGovernment ministersMinisters of the CrownNew Zealand ministers
Ministers, in the New Zealand Government, are members of Parliament who hold ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government.wikipedia
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Government of New Zealand

New Zealand GovernmentgovernmentNew Zealand
Ministers, in the New Zealand Government, are members of Parliament who hold ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government.
Executive power is exercised by ministers, all of whom are sworn into the Executive Council and accountable to the elected legislature, the House of Representatives.

Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-GeneralGovernorGovernor of New Zealand
This includes formulating and implementing policies and advising the governor-general.
Constitutional functions of the governor-general include presiding over the Executive Council, appointing ministers and judges, granting royal assent to legislation, and summoning and dissolving parliament.

Prime Minister of New Zealand

Prime MinisterPremierNew Zealand Prime Minister
In practice, the governor-general is obliged to follow the advice of the prime minister on the appointment and dismissal of ministers.
The Prime Minister (informally abbreviated to PM) ranks as the most senior government minister.

Executive Council of New Zealand

Executive CouncilMember of Executive CouncilExecutive Council in New Zealand
All ministers serve concurrently as councillors of the Executive Council of New Zealand.
All Government ministers must be appointed as executive councillors before they are appointed as ministers; therefore all Cabinet ministers are also executive councillors.

New Zealand Parliament

ParliamentParliament of New ZealandHouse of Representatives
When Parliament was established, however, many believed that they would soon replace these appointed officials, with ministerial positions being given to members of Parliament instead.
The New Zealand Government comprises a prime minister (head of government) and other ministers.

Cabinet of New Zealand

Cabinetcabinet ministerNew Zealand Cabinet
Today, the Executive Council is not used for deliberation—rather, Cabinet is the forum for debate.
The Cabinet of New Zealand (Te Rūnanga o te Kāwanatanga o Aotearoa) is the New Zealand Government's body of senior ministers, responsible to the New Zealand Parliament.

Attorney-General (New Zealand)

Attorney-GeneralAttorney GeneralAttorney-General of New Zealand
The Attorney-General is simultaneously a ministerial position and the chief law officer of the Crown, and has responsibility for supervising New Zealand law and advising the government on legal matters.

Member of parliament

MPMemberMembers of Parliament
Ministers, in the New Zealand Government, are members of Parliament who hold ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government.

The Crown

British CrownCrownAustralian Crown
Ministers, in the New Zealand Government, are members of Parliament who hold ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government.

Public policy

public affairspublic policiespolicy
This includes formulating and implementing policies and advising the governor-general.

Executive (government)

executiveexecutive branchExecutive power
Ministers collectively make up the executive branch of the New Zealand state.

Advice (constitutional)

adviceConstitutional adviceadvice of
In practice, the governor-general is obliged to follow the advice of the prime minister on the appointment and dismissal of ministers.

Minister of the Crown

ministers of the Crownministerministers
These executives are also formally titled "ministers of the Crown", as in other Commonwealth realms.

Commonwealth realm

Commonwealth realmsrealmsCommonwealth
These executives are also formally titled "ministers of the Crown", as in other Commonwealth realms.

Portfolio

Portfolio (disambiguation)portfoliosProduct portfolio
A minister is generally charged with supervising a particular aspect of the government's activities ("portfolio"), such as the provision of health services (Minister of Health) or the upkeep of law enforcement (Minister of Police).

Minister of Health (New Zealand)

Minister of HealthHealth MinisterMinister of Public Health
A minister is generally charged with supervising a particular aspect of the government's activities ("portfolio"), such as the provision of health services (Minister of Health) or the upkeep of law enforcement (Minister of Police).

Minister of Police (New Zealand)

Minister of PolicePolice
A minister is generally charged with supervising a particular aspect of the government's activities ("portfolio"), such as the provision of health services (Minister of Health) or the upkeep of law enforcement (Minister of Police).

Public sector organisations in New Zealand

public servicestate sector organisationgovernment agency
A minister is also responsible for a corresponding public sector organisation, usually known as a department or ministry.

Ministry (government department)

ministrydepartmentgovernment ministry
A minister is also responsible for a corresponding public sector organisation, usually known as a department or ministry.

Minister without portfolio

ministers without portfoliowithout portfolioShadow Minister without Portfolio
Sometimes, people may be appointed ministers without being given any specific role—they are known as ministers without portfolio.

Sinecure

sinecuressinecuristsinecurists
Such appointments have become rare today, although sometimes a person may be appointed to a sinecure portfolio such as "Minister of State" for similar purposes.

Minister of State

Ministers of StateState MinisterMinister
Such appointments have become rare today, although sometimes a person may be appointed to a sinecure portfolio such as "Minister of State" for similar purposes.

Political party

political partiespartyparties
The recommendations that a prime minister chooses to give are theoretically their own affair, but the political party (or parties) behind them will almost certainly have views on the matter, and most recommendations are made only after negotiation and bargaining.

New Zealand Labour Party

Labour PartyLabourLabour Government
Different parties have different mechanisms for this—the Labour Party, for example, has provision for its parliamentary caucus to select ministers, while the process of portfolio allocation remains with the Labour prime minister.

Caucus

caucusesparty caucusWomen's Caucus
Different parties have different mechanisms for this—the Labour Party, for example, has provision for its parliamentary caucus to select ministers, while the process of portfolio allocation remains with the Labour prime minister.