Ministry of Works (United Kingdom)

Ministry of WorksMinistry of Public Building and WorksMinister of WorksMinistry of Public Buildings and WorksTudor Walters CommitteeMinister of Public Building and WorksOffice of WorksMinistry of Works and PlanningCommissioners of Works and Public BuildingsMinistry of Public Building and Works (Great Britain)
The Ministry of Works was a department of the UK Government formed in 1940, during World War II, to organise the requisitioning of property for wartime use.wikipedia
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Secretary of State for the Environment

Department of the EnvironmentDepartment for the EnvironmentEnvironment Secretary
In 1970 the Ministry was absorbed into the Department of the Environment (DoE), although from 1972 most former Works functions were transferred to the largely autonomous Property Services Agency (PSA).
This was created by Edward Heath as a combination of the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, the Ministry of Transport and the Ministry of Public Building and Works on 15 October 1970.

Property Services Agency

PSAArmy Property Services Department
In 1970 the Ministry was absorbed into the Department of the Environment (DoE), although from 1972 most former Works functions were transferred to the largely autonomous Property Services Agency (PSA).
The PSA had its antecedents in the Ministry of Works and earlier departments dating back to the Office of Works.

Office of Works

Surveyor of the King's WorksComptroller of the King's WorksKing's Works
The department originally derived from the Office of Works (Kings Works) responsible only for royal properties (1378-1832) which became the Office of Woods, Forest, Land Revenues and Works (1832-1852).
It was reconstituted as a government department in 1851 and became part of the Ministry of Works in 1940.

English Heritage

EHAncient Monuments BoardEnglish Heritage Trust
Briefly this became the Ministry of Works & Planning (1942-3), the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) 1951-62, the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works (1962–70) before being subsumed in the Department of the Environment in 1970 and English Heritage in 1984.
There was the 'Kings Works' after the Norman Conquest; the Office of Works (1378–1832); the Office of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues and Works (1832–1851); and the Ministry of Works (1851–1962).

Historic Scotland

Historic Environment ScotlandH.S.Historic Scotland Foundation
Apart from English Heritage, Historic Scotland and Cadw, its vast archive is dispersed throughout many other organisations including national Museums and Galleries, other government departments including the Government Art Collection and the now hived-off agencies covering Royal Parks and Palaces.
Historic Scotland was a successor organisation to the Ancient Monuments Division of the Ministry of Works and the Scottish Development Department.

Commissioners of Woods and Forests

First Commissioner of Woods and ForestsCommissioner of Woods and ForestsCommissioners of Woods, Forests and Land Revenues
The name of the commission was changed in 1832 to the Commissioners of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues, Works and Buildings. The Crown Lands Act 1851 replaced the Commissioners with two separate commissions, the Commissioners of Works and Public Buildings and the Commissioners of Woods, Forests and Land Revenues dividing between them the public and the commercial functions of the Crown lands.

Cadw

historic buildingAncient monuments and historic buildingsHeritage in Wales
Apart from English Heritage, Historic Scotland and Cadw, its vast archive is dispersed throughout many other organisations including national Museums and Galleries, other government departments including the Government Art Collection and the now hived-off agencies covering Royal Parks and Palaces.
Cadw has been appointed by the Welsh Government and is the successor body in Wales to the Ministry of Works.

BT Tower

Post Office TowerGPO TowerTelecom Tower
The tower was designed by the architects of the Ministry of Public Building and Works: the chief architects were Eric Bedford and G. R. Yeats.

Ordnance Survey

OSOS mapOS maps
The new head office building was designed by the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works for 4000 staff, including many new recruits who were taken on in the late 1960s and early 70s as draughtsmen and surveyors.

Government of the United Kingdom

British GovernmentUK GovernmentGovernment
The Ministry of Works was a department of the UK Government formed in 1940, during World War II, to organise the requisitioning of property for wartime use.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The Ministry of Works was a department of the UK Government formed in 1940, during World War II, to organise the requisitioning of property for wartime use.

War Office

British War OfficeWar DepartmentOld War Office Building
In 1962 it was renamed the Ministry of Public Building and Works, and acquired the extra responsibility of monitoring the building industry as well as taking over the works departments from the War Office, Air Ministry and Admiralty.

Air Ministry

British Air MinistryAir BoardAir Council
In 1962 it was renamed the Ministry of Public Building and Works, and acquired the extra responsibility of monitoring the building industry as well as taking over the works departments from the War Office, Air Ministry and Admiralty.

Admiralty

British AdmiraltyLord High Admiralthe Admiralty
In 1962 it was renamed the Ministry of Public Building and Works, and acquired the extra responsibility of monitoring the building industry as well as taking over the works departments from the War Office, Air Ministry and Admiralty.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The tradition of building specific structures for military or governmental use began to break down at the time of World War I, when the unprecedented need for armaments prompted the rapid construction of factories in English locations where a skilled workforce was not easily recruited.

Architect

architectsarchitectural firmmaster builder
Architect Frank Baines (1877–1933) guided the rapid development of estates of houses, mainly in a terraced style, for workers and their families in places close to the required factories and depots.

Frank Baines

Sir Frank Baines
Architect Frank Baines (1877–1933) guided the rapid development of estates of houses, mainly in a terraced style, for workers and their families in places close to the required factories and depots.

Royal Arsenal

Woolwich ArsenalWoolwichRoyal Laboratory
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

Woolwich

Woolwich, EnglandWoolwich, LondonNorth Woolwich
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

Eltham

Eltham, LondonEltham ParkEltham, Kent
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

Shooter's Hill

Shooters Hill
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

Hendon

Hendon, LondonHendon, MiddlesexBrent Street
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

London Borough of Brent

BrentBorough of BrentBrent, London
Examples included the Well Hall garden suburb south of the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (between Eltham and Shooters Hill), Aeroville near the Grahame-White aeroplane factory at Hendon, and the Roe Green estate at Stag Lane in the London Borough of Brent.

Tudor Walters

Sir Tudor WaltersJohn Tudor WaltersRt Hon. Sir Tudor Walters
Considering the pace of their construction, these estates were surprisingly picturesque and were subsequently considered superior in scenic terms to many estates of municipal housing that followed in the peacetime of the 1920s, guided by the Tudor Walters Committee report of 1919 and the Housing and Town Planning Act 1919.

Housing, Town Planning, &c. Act 1919

Housing Act 1919Housing and Town Planning Act 1919Addison Act
Considering the pace of their construction, these estates were surprisingly picturesque and were subsequently considered superior in scenic terms to many estates of municipal housing that followed in the peacetime of the 1920s, guided by the Tudor Walters Committee report of 1919 and the Housing and Town Planning Act 1919.