Minstrel

The Minstrels of Beverley. Woodcut of 16th-century English musicians. Left to right: pipe and tabor, fiddle, windcap instrument, lute, and shawm.

Entertainer, initially in medieval Europe.

- Minstrel
The Minstrels of Beverley. Woodcut of 16th-century English musicians. Left to right: pipe and tabor, fiddle, windcap instrument, lute, and shawm.

6 related topics

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The troubadour Perdigon playing his fiddle.

Troubadour

Composer and performer of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350).

Composer and performer of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350).

The troubadour Perdigon playing his fiddle.
William IX of Aquitaine portrayed as a knight, who first composed poetry on returning from the Crusade of 1101
Trobadours, 14th century
Musicians in the time of the Cantigas de Santa Maria. These were in the court of the king, two vielle players and one citoler.
Late 16th-century Italian cursive on paper, recording a song of Perceval Doria
Castelloza
The Monge de Montaudon receiving a sparrow hawk as a prize for his performance in a contest

The medieval jongleur/joglar is really a minstrel.

Knowledge of French in the European Union and candidate countries

Trouvère

Northern French form of the langue d'oc (Occitan) word trobador, the precursor of the modern French word troubadour.

Northern French form of the langue d'oc (Occitan) word trobador, the precursor of the modern French word troubadour.

Knowledge of French in the European Union and candidate countries

Such people existed, but they were called jongleurs and minstrels—poor musicians, male and female, on the fringes of society.

Jester

Member of the household of a nobleman or a monarch employed to entertain guests during the medieval and Renaissance eras.

Member of the household of a nobleman or a monarch employed to entertain guests during the medieval and Renaissance eras.

John Dawson Watson - Friends in Council
Hinric Hasenberger, the Court Jester by David Klöcker Ehrenstrahl, 1652
"Family of Henry VIII with Will Sommers on the far right and probably Jane Foole on the far left
17th-century engraving of Will Sommers, Henry VIII's jester
Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson by Van Dyck
P. B. Abery (1877?-1948) & Wallace Jones
Portrait of the Ferrara Court Jester Gonella by Jean Fouquet 1445
Laughing jester, unknown Early Netherlandish artist (possibly Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen), circa 1500
Susuhunan jester participating in the "Garebeg Moeloed" procession (circa 1920s), Java, Indonesia
Stańczyk, by Jan Matejko.
Jester in Weingarten, Germany, in 2015
Masquerade by Golovin - Jester with hunch (1917, Bakhrushin museum)
Portrait of the Jester Balakirev (1699-1763)
The Court Jester of Tabbyland
Шут. Фрагмент миниатюры "Gaharié recevant le chapel" из "Романа о Ланселоте" (Français 112 (1), fol. 45), ок. 1470
Jester-doll made by Olina Ventsel (1938-2007)
Illustration p. 284 from "Queen of the Jesters" [Caption: Brought it down with a Crash upon the Head of Henri de Villefort.] Illustrator unknown; text by Max Pemberton.
Venne Woman and a jester
Man dressed as a jester, with a fool's cap, motley and white tights.
Statue of a jester depicted in the book Letters from England by Karel Čapek
Oil on panel, signed with monogram, bears inscribed label for the Dundee Fine Art Exhibition, 1877, attached opt the reverse, 23.7x15.5 cm.
Private collection, oil on canvas. Jacob Jordaens (1641-1645).
Jester Resting on a chair by William Merritt Chase, 1875, the work is one of several trial poses William Merritt Chase painted as preparation for his Keying Up- The Court Jester
The Court Jester by John Watson Nicol, 1895, oil on canvas, 41 x 57 cm. (16.1 x 22.4 in.)
Rahere, Bouffon de Henry I et de la Reine Matilda, début 1100.
Chase William Merrit
"Keying Up" – The Court Jester by William Merritt Chase 1875. (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.)
Caricature of a court jester of Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy, in the 16th century Recueil d'Arras, a collection of portraits copied by Jacques de Boucq
William Burges, English architect
Self Portrait in a Jester's Costume
The Jester Barbarossa by Francisco Goya
Royal Jester Stańczyk
Jester Knight Christoph by Hans Wertinger (1515, Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)
Akram Mutlak Ménage À Trois Öl auf Leinwand
Bouffon
A jester with ass's ears

This modern term derives from the older form gestour, or jestour, originally from Anglo-Norman (French) meaning storyteller or minstrel.

The eight phases of The Song of Roland in one picture.

Chanson de geste

Medieval narrative, a type of epic poem that appears at the dawn of French literature.

Medieval narrative, a type of epic poem that appears at the dawn of French literature.

The eight phases of The Song of Roland in one picture.

Composed in verse, these narrative poems of moderate length (averaging 4000 lines ) were originally sung, or (later) recited, by minstrels or jongleurs.

A milestone along the Barton Bridge and Moses Gate turnpike road near Eccles, showing the spelling of "Altringham"

Rhoda Power

Pioneer English broadcaster and children's writer.

Pioneer English broadcaster and children's writer.

A milestone along the Barton Bridge and Moses Gate turnpike road near Eccles, showing the spelling of "Altringham"

The highly regarded set of stories that make up Redcap Runs Away (1952) are set in the Middle Ages and told by a runaway minstrel boy.

The Cross of Mathilde, a crux gemmata made for Mathilde, Abbess of Essen (973–1011), who is shown kneeling before the Virgin and Child in the enamel plaque. The figure of Christ is slightly later. Probably made in Cologne or Essen, the cross demonstrates several medieval techniques: cast figurative sculpture, filigree, enamelling, gem polishing and setting, and the reuse of Classical cameos and engraved gems.

Itinerant poet

Wandering minstrel, bard, musician, or other poet common in medieval Europe but extinct today.

Wandering minstrel, bard, musician, or other poet common in medieval Europe but extinct today.

The Cross of Mathilde, a crux gemmata made for Mathilde, Abbess of Essen (973–1011), who is shown kneeling before the Virgin and Child in the enamel plaque. The figure of Christ is slightly later. Probably made in Cologne or Essen, the cross demonstrates several medieval techniques: cast figurative sculpture, filigree, enamelling, gem polishing and setting, and the reuse of Classical cameos and engraved gems.

Itinerant poets were from a lower class than jesters or jongleurs, as they did not have steady work, instead travelling to make a living.