Miriam

Miriam's wellMary the sister of MosesSnow-white MiriamHebrew origin of the name "Miriam" may translate as "wished-for child,MiriãMirjamMirjamsMiryāmprophetess MiriamSister
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron.wikipedia
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Jochebed

YochevedJochabedMoses' mother
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron.
According to the Torah, Jochebed was a daughter of Levi and mother of Aaron, Miriam and Moses.

Amram

Arabic version of AmramImran Arabic version of Amram
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron.
In the Book of Exodus, Amram is the husband of Jochebed and father of Aaron, Moses and Miriam.

Aaron

HarunAharonAhron
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron.
The Hebrew Bible relates that, unlike Moses, who grew up in the Egyptian royal court, Aaron and his elder sister Miriam remained with their kinsmen in the eastern border-land of Egypt (Goshen).

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron.
Moses had one older (by seven years) sister, Miriam, and one older (by three years) brother, Aaron.

Prophet

prophetsprophetessseer
She was a prophetess and first appears in the Book of Exodus.
Some examples of prophets in the Tanakh include Abraham, Moses, Miriam, Isaiah, Samuel, Ezekiel, Malachi, and Job.

Song of the Sea

Song of MosesAz YashirExodus 15
In the biblical narrative of The Exodus, Miriam is described as a "prophetess" when she leads the Israelites in the Song of the Sea after Pharaoh's army is destroyed at the Sea of Reeds.
It is followed in verses 20 and 21 by a much shorter song sung by Miriam and the other women.

Kadesh (biblical)

KadeshKadesh BarneaKadesh-barnea
Regarding the death of Miriam, the Torah states, "The entire congregation of the children of Israel arrived at the desert of Tzin in the first month, and the people settled in Kadesh. Miriam died and was buried there."
Miriam and Aaron both died and were buried near a place named Kadesh.

Tzaraath

tzara'atskin diseasetzaraat
Afterward, Miriam is left with bodily tzara’at, which according to Jewish sources is a divine punishment for slander.
The Torah also speaks of tzaraath on two other occasions, one in reference to Moses and the other in reference to his sister, Miriam.

The Exodus

ExodusExodus from Egyptand returned
In the biblical narrative of The Exodus, Miriam is described as a "prophetess" when she leads the Israelites in the Song of the Sea after Pharaoh's army is destroyed at the Sea of Reeds.
The Israelites come to the oasis of Kadesh Barnea, where Miriam dies.

Zipporah

TzipporahSephoraJethro's daughter
The Midrash explains the entire story as follows: It became known to Miriam and Aaron that Moses had separated from intimacy with his wife Tzipora.
In the story Aaron and Miriam harshly criticize Moses' marriage to a Cushite or Kushite woman after he returned to Egypt to set the children of Israel free.

Tharbis

It has been suggested that Josephus and Irenaeus (who merely cites Josephus) identify the Cushite woman as Tharbis, “the daughter of the king of the Ethiopians”.
Some have suggested that this story is an invention, arising from the "enigmatic" verse in Numbers 12:1 that states "Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses because of the Cushite woman whom he had married".

Jewish feminism

Jewish feministJewish feministsreligious feminist
Miriam is a popular figure among some Jewish feminists.
Miriam's cup is linked to the midrash of Miriam's well, which "is a rabbinic legend that tells of a miraculous well that accompanied the Israelites during their 40 years in the desert at the Exodus from Egypt".

Rosh Chodesh

Rosh Hodeshnew moonnew month
Miriam's cup originated in the 1980s in a Boston Rosh Chodesh group; it was invented by Stephanie Loo, who filled it with what she referred to as mayim chayim (living waters) and used it in a feminist ceremony of guided meditation.
Miriam's cup (for the prophet Miriam) originated in the 1980s in a Boston Rosh Chodesh group; it was invented by Stephanie Loo, who filled it with mayim hayim (living waters) and used it in a feminist ceremony of guided meditation.

Seudat Chiyat HaMatim

Seudat Techiyat HaMetimspecial feast
According to the Midrash, the Leviathan and Behemoth, as well as the Ziz, are to be served at the Seudat Techiyat HaMetim (the feast for the righteous following the Resurrection of the Dead), to which the Passover Seder alludes, insofar as it commemorates the past Redemption together with the Cup of Elijah's heralding the future, Final Redemption.
Some Modern Orthodox Jews have revived a millennium-old custom of adding a piece of fish to the Passover Seder plate, with the lamb, egg and fish jointly symbolizing the three prophets (Moses, Aharon, and Miriam) referred to in Micah 6:4, as well as the three mythical beasts associated with the Seudat Chiyat HaMatim, which the Passover Seder, and the Cup of Elijah allude to.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
Miriam ( Mir-yām) is described in the Hebrew Bible as the daughter of Amram and Jochebed, and the sister of Moses and Aaron. It has been suggested that since according to the Hebrew Bible anyone with tzara’at was tamei, Aaron was spared this punishment in order not to interrupt his duties as High Priest.

Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.Shemot
She was a prophetess and first appears in the Book of Exodus.

Talmud

Babylonian TalmudTalmudicTalmudist
The Torah refers to her as "Miriam the Prophetess" and the Talmud names her as one of the seven major female prophets of Israel.

Midrash

MidrashimMidrashicMidrash Rabbah
According to the Midrash, the Leviathan and Behemoth, as well as the Ziz, are to be served at the Seudat Techiyat HaMetim (the feast for the righteous following the Resurrection of the Dead), to which the Passover Seder alludes, insofar as it commemorates the past Redemption together with the Cup of Elijah's heralding the future, Final Redemption. According to the Midrash, just as Moses led the men out of Egypt and taught them Torah, so too Miriam led the women and taught them Torah.

Yam Suph

Sea of ReedsReed SeaYam Suf
In the biblical narrative of The Exodus, Miriam is described as a "prophetess" when she leads the Israelites in the Song of the Sea after Pharaoh's army is destroyed at the Sea of Reeds.

Saul

King SaulBattle of GilboaSaul the King
In fact, King Saul and even the Jewish People are referred to by the term “Cushite”.

Mikveh

mikvahritual bathritual baths
But God rebuked them by calling them all out “suddenly”, causing Miriam and Aaron a great burning sensation since they lacked immersion in a mikva after marital relations.

Louis Ginzberg

Ginzberg, LouisL. Ginzberg
Afterwards, “God’s wrath flared against them.” Rabbi Louis Ginzberg wrote the anger of God to them.

Tumah and taharah

tumahritual impurityritually impure
It has been suggested that since according to the Hebrew Bible anyone with tzara’at was tamei, Aaron was spared this punishment in order not to interrupt his duties as High Priest.

High Priest of Israel

High PriestKohen GadolJewish High Priest
It has been suggested that since according to the Hebrew Bible anyone with tzara’at was tamei, Aaron was spared this punishment in order not to interrupt his duties as High Priest.

Josephus

Flavius JosephusJosephus FlaviusTitus Flavius Josephus
It has been suggested that Josephus and Irenaeus (who merely cites Josephus) identify the Cushite woman as Tharbis, “the daughter of the king of the Ethiopians”.