Mission Indians

Mission IndianCalifornia Mission IndiansCalifornia Missionentered the missionIndianKwaaymiiMissionMission Indian AgencyMission Indian neophytesmission system
Mission Indians are the indigenous peoples of California who lived in Southern California and were forcibly relocated from their traditional dwellings, villages, and homelands to live and work at 15 Franciscan missions in Southern California and the Asistencias and Estancias established between 1796 and 1823 in the Las Californias Province of the Viceroyalty of New Spain.wikipedia
218 Related Articles

Spanish missions in California

California missionsmissionsSpanish missions
Mission Indians are the indigenous peoples of California who lived in Southern California and were forcibly relocated from their traditional dwellings, villages, and homelands to live and work at 15 Franciscan missions in Southern California and the Asistencias and Estancias established between 1796 and 1823 in the Las Californias Province of the Viceroyalty of New Spain.
Indians were not paid wages as they were not considered free laborers and, as a result, the missions were able to profit from the goods produced by the Mission Indians to the detriment of the other Spanish and Mexican settlers of the time who could not compete economically with the advantage of the mission system.

Mission San Juan Capistrano

San Juan CapistranoReturn of the Swallowannual springtime return
For instance, the Payomkowishum were renamed Luiseños after the Mission San Luis Rey and the Acjachemem were renamed the Juaneños after the Mission San Juan Capistrano.
By 1790, the number of Indian reductions had grown to 700 Mission Indians, and just six years later nearly 1,000 "neophytes" (recent converts) lived in or around the Mission compound.

Mexican secularization act of 1833

secularizationsecularizedAn Act for the Secularization of the Missions of California
Mexico secularized the missions and transferred or sold the lands to other non-Native administrators or owners.
The settlers introduced European fruits, vegetables, cattle, horses, ranching and technology into the Alta California region and to the Mission Indians.

Ranchos of California

Mexican land grantranchosrancho
Many of the Mission Indians worked on the newly established ranchos with little improvement in their living conditions.
Their workers also included Native Americans who had learned to speak Spanish, many of them former Mission residents.

Mission San Luis Rey de Francia

Mission San Luis ReySan Luis ReySan Luis Rey Mission
640 acres each) with former railroad grant lands that form much of the city; the Morongo Reservation in the San Gorgonio Pass area; and the Pala Reservation which includes San Antonio de Pala Asistencia (Pala Mission) of the Mission San Luis Rey de Francia in Pala.
This Mission lent its name to the Luiseño tribe of Mission Indians.

San Antonio de Pala Asistencia

Mission San Antonio de PalaPalaPala Asistencia
640 acres each) with former railroad grant lands that form much of the city; the Morongo Reservation in the San Gorgonio Pass area; and the Pala Reservation which includes San Antonio de Pala Asistencia (Pala Mission) of the Mission San Luis Rey de Francia in Pala.
It is the only historic mission facility still serving a Mission Indian tribe.

San Bernardino de Sena Estancia

San Bernardino AsistenciaSan Bernardino Ranchothe ''estancia
It was built to graze cattle, and for Indian Reductions of the Serrano people and Cahuilla people into Mission Indians.

La Purisima Mission

Mission La Purísima ConcepciónMission La PurisimaLa Purisima
By 1803, the Mission Indians population had increased, by Indian Reductions, to 1,436 Chumash people.

California mission clash of cultures

adaptations to circumstancesclash of culturescultural practices
The Catholic priests forbade the Indians from practicing their native culture, resulting in the disruption of many tribes' linguistic, spiritual and cultural practices.

Indigenous peoples of California

indigenous people of CaliforniaCalifornia IndiansNative Californian
Mission Indians are the indigenous peoples of California who lived in Southern California and were forcibly relocated from their traditional dwellings, villages, and homelands to live and work at 15 Franciscan missions in Southern California and the Asistencias and Estancias established between 1796 and 1823 in the Las Californias Province of the Viceroyalty of New Spain.

Acjachemen

JuaneñoAcjachememAjachmem
For instance, the Payomkowishum were renamed Luiseños after the Mission San Luis Rey and the Acjachemem were renamed the Juaneños after the Mission San Juan Capistrano. But, resident tribes, including the Tongva in the first and the Juaneño-Acjachemen Nation in the last county (as well as the Coastal Chumash in Santa Barbara County) continue seeking federal Tribal recognition by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians

Barona Indian ReservationBarona Band of Mission IndiansBarona Reservation
The Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

Population of Native California

as high as 705,000CaliforniaCalifornian
With no acquired immunity to the new European diseases and changed cultural and lifestyle demands, the population of Native American Mission Indians suffered high mortality and dramatic decreases especially in the coastal regions where population was reduced by 90 percent between 1769 and 1848.

Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians

Cuyapaipe Community of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Cuyapaipe ReservationEwiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, CaliforniaEwiiaapaayp Indian Reservation
The Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, formerly known as the Cuyapaipe Community of Diegueño Mission Indians of the Cuyapaipe Reservation, is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians, located in San Diego County, California.

Mission San Antonio de Padua

Mission San AntonioSan Antonio de PaduaMission of San Antonio de Padua
By 1805, the number had increased to 1,300, but in 1834, after the secularization laws went into effect, the total number of Mission Indians at the Mission San Antonio was only 150.

Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians

Inaja and Cosmit ReservationInaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, CaliforniaInaja and Cosmit Band of Mission Indians
The Inaja Band of Diegueño Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

Ohlone

Ohlone peopleCostanoanKalindaruk
The Ohlone who went to live at the missions were called Mission Indians, and also neophytes. They were blended with other Native American ethnicities such as the Coast Miwok transported from the North Bay into the Mission San Francisco and Mission San José.

Jamul Indian Village

JamulJamul Indian Village of CaliforniaJamul Band of Mission Indians
The Jamul Indian Village of California is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians

La Posta Indian ReservationLa PostaLa Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation, California
The La Posta Band of Diegueño Mission Indians of the La Posta Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of the Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

Tongva

Tongva peopleGabrielinoGabrieleño
But, resident tribes, including the Tongva in the first and the Juaneño-Acjachemen Nation in the last county (as well as the Coastal Chumash in Santa Barbara County) continue seeking federal Tribal recognition by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians

Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, CaliforniaManzanita ReservationManzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation
The Manzanita Band of Diegueño Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as part of the Mission Indians.

Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians

Mesa Grande Indian ReservationMesa Grande ReservationMesa Grande
The Mesa Grande Band of Diegueño Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Kumeyaay Indians, who are sometimes known as Mission Indians.

Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians

Los Coyotes BandLos Coyotes Band of Cahuilla & Cupeno Indians of the Los Coyotes Reservation, CaliforniaLos Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeño Indians
Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeño Indians of the Los Coyotes Reservation is a federally recognized tribe of Cahuilla and Cupeño Indians, who are Mission Indians located in California.

Morongo Band of Mission Indians

MorongoMorongo Indian ReservationMorongo Reservation
Although many tribes in California are known as Mission Indians, some, such as those at Morongo, were never a part of the Spanish Missions in California.

Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation

Sycuan ReservationSycuan Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of CaliforniaSycuan Indian Reservation
The Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation is a federally recognized tribe of Mission Indians from Southern California, located in the unincorporated area of San Diego County just east of El Cajon.