Mithridates I of Parthia

Mithridates IMithradates IMithridatesMithradates I of ParthiaMehrdad IMithridates the Great
Mithridates I ( Mihrdāt), also known as Mithridates I the Great, was king of the Parthian Empire from 171 BC to 132 BC.wikipedia
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Phraates II

Phraates II of ParthiaFarhad II
Mithridates I died in 132 BC, and was succeeded by his son Phraates II.
He was the son of Mithridates I (171–132 BC).

Arsaces I of Parthia

Arsaces IArsacesArshak
Mithridates was the son of Priapatius, the great-nephew of the first Arsacid king, Arsaces I ((r.
By the time of his death, Arsaces had laid the foundations of a strong state, which would eventually transform into an empire under his great-grand nephew, Mithridates I, who assumed the ancient Near Eastern royal title of King of Kings.

Phraates I

Phraates I of ParthiaFarhad I
247 – 217)). Mithridates had several brothers, including Artabanus and his older brother Phraates I, the latter succeeding their father in 176 BC as the Parthian king.
He died relatively young, and appointed as his successor not one of his sons, but his brother Mithridates I (165–132 BC).

Achaemenid Empire

AchaemenidPersianPersian Empire
He was the first Parthian king to assume the ancient Achaemenid title of King of Kings.
When the Parthian Arsacid king Mithridates I (c.

Seleucid Empire

SeleucidSeleucidsSeleucid dynasty
Turning his sights on the Seleucid realm, Mithridates invaded Media and occupied Ecbatana in 148 or 147 BC; the region had recently become unstable after the Seleucids suppressed a rebellion led by Timarchus.
The Parthians under Mithridates I of Parthia conquered much of the remaining eastern part of the Seleucid Empire in the mid-2nd century BC, while the independent Greco-Bactrian Kingdom continued to flourish in the northeast.

Eucratides I

EucratidesEucratides the Great
This proved beneficial for Mithridates, who undertook his first campaign against the Greco-Bactrian ruler Eucratides I ((r.
Justin explains that Eucratides acceded to the throne at about the same time as Mithridates, whose rule is accurately known to have started in 171 BC, thereby giving an approximate date for the accession of Eucratides:

Artabanus I of Parthia

Artabanus IArtabanus IIArtabanus
247 – 217)). Mithridates had several brothers, including Artabanus and his older brother Phraates I, the latter succeeding their father in 176 BC as the Parthian king.
404 – 358)). Achaemenid titles were also assumed by the Arsacids; Artabanus I's brother Mithridates I ((r.

Greco-Bactrian Kingdom

Greco-BactrianGreco-BactriansBactria
When Mithridates ascended the throne in 171 BC upon Phraates' death, he first turned his sights on the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom which had been considerably weakened as a result of its wars against the neighbouring Sogdians, Drangianans and Indians.
During or after his Indian campaigns, Eucratides was attacked and defeated by the Parthian king Mithridates I, possibly in alliance with partisans of the Euthydemids:

Priapatius

Phriapatius
Mithridates was the son of Priapatius, the great-nephew of the first Arsacid king, Arsaces I ((r.
176 – 171 BC)), who was his oldest son and successor, Mithridates I ((r.

Rhodogune of Parthia

Rhodogune
There Mithridates treated his captive with great hospitality; he even married his daughter Rhodogune to Demetrius.
Rhodogune was the daughter of the Parthian king Mithridates I (171 BCE-132 BCE), and sister of Phraates II (ruled 132 BCE-127 BCE).

Seleucia

Seleucia on the Tigris Seleucia (Seleucia-on-the-Tigris)Babylonian Seleucia
This victory was followed by the Parthian conquest of Babylonia in Mesopotamia, where Mithridates had coins minted at Seleucia in 141 BC and held an official investiture ceremony.
In 141 BC, the Parthians under Mithridates I conquered the city, and Seleucia became the western capital of the Parthian Empire.

Ctesiphon

Seleucia-CtesiphonSelucia-CtesiphonAl-Madain
Whereas Hecatompylos had served as the first Parthian capital, Mithridates established royal residences at Seleucia, Ecbatana, Ctesiphon and his newly founded city, Mithradatkert (Nisa), where the tombs of the Arsacid kings were built and maintained.
It was built on the site of a military camp established across from Seleucia by Mithridates I of Parthia.

Babylonia

BabyloniansBabylonianBabylonian Empire
This victory was followed by the Parthian conquest of Babylonia in Mesopotamia, where Mithridates had coins minted at Seleucia in 141 BC and held an official investiture ceremony.
The Parthian king Mithridates conquered the region into the Parthian Empire in 150 BC, and the region became something of a battleground between Greeks and Parthians.

Hyrcania

GurganHyrcaniansGorgan
Mithridates shortly afterwards retired to Hyrcania, whilst his forces subdued the kingdoms of Elymais and Characene and occupied Susa.
After Mithridates' conquest of Media in 148 BC, Hyrcanians launched an unsuccessful revolt, which was crushed by Mithridates shortly afterwards.

Philhellenism

philhellenephilhellenesphilhellenic
Mithridates I also titled himself Philhellene ("friend of the Greeks") on his coins, which was a political act done in order to establish friendly relations with his newly conquered Greek subjects.

Media (region)

MediaMedianMedia Magna
Turning his sights on the Seleucid realm, Mithridates invaded Media and occupied Ecbatana in 148 or 147 BC; the region had recently become unstable after the Seleucids suppressed a rebellion led by Timarchus.
But with Demetrius I, the dissolution of the Seleucid Empire began, brought about chiefly by the intrigues of the Romans, and shortly afterwards, in about 150, the Parthian king Mithradates I conquered Media.

Parthian Empire

ParthianParthiansArsacid
Mithridates I ( Mihrdāt), also known as Mithridates I the Great, was king of the Parthian Empire from 171 BC to 132 BC.
Mithridates I of Parthia (r.

Kings of Persis

King of PersisPersis
Furthermore, around this period he granted the Kings of Persis more autonomy, most likely in an effort to maintain healthy relations with them as the Parthian Empire was under constant conflict with the Saka, Seleucids, and the Mesenians.
The Parthian Empire then took control of Persis under Arsacid king Mithridates I (ca.

Nisa, Turkmenistan

NisaNysaNyssa
Whereas Hecatompylos had served as the first Parthian capital, Mithridates established royal residences at Seleucia, Ecbatana, Ctesiphon and his newly founded city, Mithradatkert (Nisa), where the tombs of the Arsacid kings were built and maintained.
Nisa was later renamed Mithradatkirt Parthian: 𐭌𐭕𐭓𐭃𐭕𐭊𐭓𐭕‎ ("fortress of Mithradates") by Mithridates I of Parthia (reigned c. 171 BC–138 BC).

Demetrius II Nicator

Demetrius IIDemetrius II of SyriaDemetrius
The Seleucid ruler Demetrius II Nicator was at first successful in his efforts to reconquer Mesopotamia, however, the Seleucids were eventually defeated and Demetrius himself was captured by Parthian forces and taken to Hyrcania.
Mithridates I, king of Parthia had taken advantage of the conflict between Demetrius and Tryphon to seize control of Susa and Elymais in 144 and of Mesopotamia in mid-141 BC.

Khuzestan Province

KhuzestanKhuzistanKhūzestān Province
One of the most famous Parthian reliefs is a scene with six men at Xong-e Noruzi in Khuzestan.
As the Seleucid dynasty weakened, Mehrdad I the Parthian (171–137 BC), gained ascendency over the region.

King of Kings

RajadhirajaQueen of KingsShahanshah
He was the first Parthian king to assume the ancient Achaemenid title of King of Kings.
The standard royal title of the Arsacid (Parthian) kings while in Babylon was Aršaka šarru ("Arsacid king"), King of Kings (recorded as šar šarrāni by contemporary Babylonians) was adopted first by Mithridates I (r.

Mithridates II of Parthia

Mithridates IIMithridatesMithradates II of Parthia
Though Mithridates I was the first to readopt the title, it was not commonly used among Parthian rulers until the reign of his nephew and namesake Mithridates II, from c. 109/8 BC onwards.
Achaemenid titles were also assumed by the Arsacids, including the title of "king of kings" by Mithridates I ((r.

Ancient Near East

ancient MesopotamiaNear EastAncient Near Eastern
During his reign, Parthia was transformed from a small kingdom into a major political power in the Ancient East as a result of his conquests.