Mixed-sex education

Coeducationalco-educationalmixedcoeducationcoedco-edco-educationmixed-sexco-educational schoolMixed-gender education
Mixed-sex education, also known as mixed-gender education, co-education or coeducation (abbreviated to co-ed or coed), is a system of education where males and females are educated together.wikipedia
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Nanjing University

Nanking UniversityUniversity of NanjingNational Southeastern University
The first mixed-sex institution of higher learning in China was the Nanjing Higher Normal Institute, which was renamed National Central University and Nanjing University.
The school became the first higher learning institution in China to recruit coeducational students.

Bedales School

BedalesBedales Boarding School
In England the first non-Quaker mixed-sex public boarding school was Bedales School, founded in 1893 by John Haden Badley and becoming mixed in 1898.
Bedales School is a co-educational, boarding and day independent school in the village of Steep, near the market town of Petersfield in Hampshire, England.

Clifton College

CliftonClifton College Close GroundClifton College, Bristol
Many previously single-sex schools have begun to accept both sexes in the past few decades: for example, Clifton College began to accept girls in 1987.
Clifton College is a co-educational independent school in the suburb of Clifton in the city of Bristol in South West England, founded in 1862.

John Haden Badley

John BadleyJ H BadleyJ.H. Badley
In England the first non-Quaker mixed-sex public boarding school was Bedales School, founded in 1893 by John Haden Badley and becoming mixed in 1898.
John Haden Badley (21 February 1865 – 6 March 1967) was an English author, educator, and founder of Bedales School, which claims to have become the first coeducational public boarding school in England in 1893.

University of Bristol

Bristol UniversityBristoluniversity
The first higher-education institution in the United Kingdom to allow women and men to enter on equal terms, and hence be admitted to academic degrees, was the University of Bristol (then established as University College, Bristol) in 1876.
The University College was the first such institution in the country to admit women on the same basis as men.

Single-sex education

Boyssingle-sexGirls
Many previously single-sex schools have begun to accept both sexes in the past few decades: for example, Clifton College began to accept girls in 1987. Whereas single-sex education was more common up to the 19th century, mixed-sex education has since become standard in many cultures, particularly in Western countries.
Increased secularization in the 20th century also contributed to the acceptance of mixed sex education.

Archbishop Tenison's Church of England High School, Croydon

Archbishop Tenison's SchoolArchbishop Tenison's School, CroydonTenison's School
The world's oldest co-educational school is thought to be Archbishop Tenison's Church of England High School, Croydon, established in 1714 in the United Kingdom, which admitted boys and girls from its opening onwards.

Dollar Academy

AcademyDollar InstituteFortunas
The world's oldest co-educational day and boarding school is Dollar Academy, a junior and senior school for males and females from ages 5 to 18 in Scotland, United Kingdom.

University of Iowa

IowaState University of IowaThe University of Iowa
The University of Iowa became the first coeducational public or state university in the United States in 1855, and for much of the next century, public universities, and land grant universities in particular, would lead the way in mixed-sex higher education.
Among American universities, the University of Iowa was the first public university to open as coeducational, opened the first coeducational medical school, and opened the first Department of Religious Studies at a public university.

Cornell University

CornellCornell University PressUniversity of Cornell
East of the Mississippi, Wheaton College (Illinois) graduated its first female student in 1862, while Cornell University and the University of Michigan each admitted their first female students in 1870.
Since its founding, Cornell has been a co-educational, non-sectarian institution where admission has not been restricted by religion or race.

Vassar College

VassarJames Monroe TaylorVassar Brewers
Notable examples include the Seven Sisters colleges, of which Vassar College is now coeducational and Radcliffe College has merged with Harvard University.
Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York.

Women's college

womenwomen's collegeswomen's university
After the Islamization policies in early 1980s the government established Women's colleges and Women's universities to promote education among women who were hesitant of studying in mixed-sex environment.
While there were a few coeducational colleges (such as Oberlin College founded in 1833, Lawrence University in 1847, Antioch College in 1853, and Bates College in 1855), most colleges and universities of high standing at that time were exclusively for men.

Mary Jane Patterson

Later, in 1862, the first black woman to receive a bachelor's degree (Mary Jane Patterson) also earned it from Oberlin College.
Oberlin was popular because it had a racially integrated co-ed college.

Uyghurs

UyghurUighurUighurs
In China Muslim Hui and Muslim Salars are against coeducation, due to Islam, Uyghurs are the only Muslims in China that do not mind coeducation and practice it.
Uyghurs in China, unlike the Hui and Salar who are also mostly Muslim, generally do not oppose coeducation.

Lu Zhiwei

Luh Chih-wei
The idea was supported by the president Guo Bingwen, academic director Liu Boming, and such famous professors as Lu Zhiwei and Yang Xingfo, but opposed by many famous men of the time.

Oberlin College

OberlinOberlin Collegiate InstituteOberlin College and Conservatory
The first co-educational college to be founded was Oberlin Collegiate Institute in Oberlin, Ohio.
Oberlin is also the oldest coeducational college in the United States, having admitted four women in 1837.

Goucher College

GoucherWomen's College of BaltimoreWoman's College of Baltimore
Other notable women's colleges that have become coeducational include Wheaton College in Massachusetts, Ohio Wesleyan Female College in Ohio, Skidmore College, Wells College, and Sarah Lawrence College in New York state, Pitzer College in California, Goucher College in Maryland and Connecticut College.
It was formerly a women’s college until becoming coeducational in 1986.

Seven Sisters (colleges)

Seven SistersSeven Sisters collegesSeven Sister colleges
Notable examples include the Seven Sisters colleges, of which Vassar College is now coeducational and Radcliffe College has merged with Harvard University.

Women's colleges in the United States

women's collegewomenwomen's colleges
According to Irene Harwarth, Mindi Maline, and Elizabeth DeBra: "women's colleges were founded during the mid- and late-19th century in response to a need for advanced education for women at a time when they were not admitted to most institutions of higher education."
While there were a few coeducational colleges (such as Oberlin College founded in 1833, Guilford College, in 1837, Lawrence University in 1847, Antioch College in 1853, and Bates College in 1855), almost all colleges and universities at that time were exclusively for men.

Florida State University

Florida StateFlorida State College for WomenFSU
In 1905, the Buckman Act was one of consolidation in governance and funding but separation in race and gender, with the campus that became what is now Florida State University designated to serve white females during this era, the campus that became what is now the University of Florida serving white males, and coeducation stipulated only for the campus serving black students at the site of what is now Florida A & M.
In 1858 the seminary absorbed the Tallahassee Female Academy, established in 1843, and became coeducational.

St. Paul's Co-educational College

St. Paul's Co-educational (Kennedy Road) Primary SchoolSt Paul's Co-Educational CollegeSt. Paul’s Co-Educational College
St. Paul's Co-educational College was the first mixed-sex secondary school in Hong Kong.

List of women's colleges

List of current and historical women's universities and collegeswomen's universityuniversity
After the Islamization policies in early 1980s the government established Women's colleges and Women's universities to promote education among women who were hesitant of studying in mixed-sex environment.
Where institutions have become coeducational, this is noted, along with the year the enrollment policy was changed.

Ohio Wesleyan Female College

Wesleyan Female CollegeCincinnati Wesleyan CollegeCincinnati Wesleyan Women's College
Other notable women's colleges that have become coeducational include Wheaton College in Massachusetts, Ohio Wesleyan Female College in Ohio, Skidmore College, Wells College, and Sarah Lawrence College in New York state, Pitzer College in California, Goucher College in Maryland and Connecticut College.
It is one of the oldest institutions of higher education for women in the United States, which provided general educational opportunities to women in an era when co-educational institutions of higher learning were not yet fully open to students of both sexes.

Franklin & Marshall College

Franklin and Marshall CollegeFranklin & MarshallFranklin and Marshall
For example, in 1787, the predecessor to Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, opened as a mixed-sex secondary school.
In the fall of 1969, 82 freshman women and 34 female transfer students were enrolled in F&M's first coeducational class.

Wheaton College (Illinois)

Wheaton CollegeWheaton (IL)Wheaton
East of the Mississippi, Wheaton College (Illinois) graduated its first female student in 1862, while Cornell University and the University of Michigan each admitted their first female students in 1870.