Modern English

EnglishModern18th century18th-centuryEnglish vernacularLate Modern Englishmodern spoken Englishmodern variantReceived Standard English
Modern English (sometimes New English or NE (ME) as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.wikipedia
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English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Modern English (sometimes New English or NE (ME) as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.
Modern English has been spreading around the world since the 17th century by the worldwide influence of the British Empire and the United States.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
Modern English (sometimes New English or NE (ME) as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.
It was West Saxon that formed the basis for the literary standard of the later Old English period, although the dominant forms of Middle and Modern English would develop mainly from Mercian.

Early Modern English

Elizabethan EnglishEnglishShakespearean English
With some differences in vocabulary, texts from the early 17th century, such as the works of William Shakespeare and the King James Bible, are considered to be in Modern English, or more specifically, are referred to as using Early Modern English or Elizabethan English.
Early Modern English or Early New English (sometimes abbreviated to EModE, EMnE, or EME) is the stage of the English language from the beginning of the Tudor period to the English Interregnum and Restoration, or from the transition from Middle English, in the late 15th century, to the transition to Modern English, in the mid-to-late 17th century.

Great Vowel Shift

a change in vowel pronunciationby 1600Great English Vowel Shift
Modern English (sometimes New English or NE (ME) as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.
The main difference between the pronunciation of Middle English in the year 1400 and Modern English (Received Pronunciation) is in the value of the long vowels.

Middle English

Late Middle EnglishMiddleEarly Middle English
Modern English (sometimes New English or NE (ME) as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.
The irregularity of present-day English orthography is largely due to pronunciation changes that have taken place over the Early Modern English and Modern English eras.

English subjunctive

subjunctiveFuture subjunctivesubjunctive mood
In Modern English, the subjunctive form of a verb often looks identical to the indicative form, and thus subjunctives are not a very visible grammatical feature of English.

English irregular verbs

irregular verbsirregularEnglish (irregular)
Irregular verbs in Modern English typically derive from verbs that followed more regular patterns at a previous stage in the history of the language.

Phonological history of English

Phonological history of the English languagehistorical sound changesphonology
This table describes the main historical developments of English vowels in the last 1000 years, beginning with late Old English and focusing on the Middle English and Modern English changes leading to the current forms.

Do-support

do''-supportauxiliary ''dodo
However, in the negated and inverted clauses referred to above, it is used because the conventions of Modern English syntax permit these constructions only when an auxiliary is present.

T–V distinction

T-V distinctioninformalformal
Modern English no longer has a T–V distinction, with the exception of a few dialects.

The

definite articledefinitive articledefinite article "the
In Middle English, these had all merged into þe, the ancestor of the Modern English word the.

List of dialects of English

English dialectsList of dialects of the English languagevarieties of English
Modern English has many dialects spoken in many countries throughout the world, sometimes collectively referred to as the anglosphere.

Thou

theethedidst
In standard modern English, thou continues to be used in formal religious contexts, in literature that seeks to reproduce archaic language, and in certain fixed phrases such as "fare thee well".

International English

World EnglishEnglish as an International LanguageGlobal English
However, less than a quarter of the vocabulary of Modern English is derived from the shared ancestry with other West Germanic languages because of extensive borrowings from Norse, Norman, Latin, and other languages.

History of English

History of the English languagestandardization of English spellingEnglish
Modern English proper, similar in most respects to that spoken today, was in place by the late 17th century.

Latin alphabet

LatinRoman alphabetRoman
Old English, for example, was rarely written with even proper nouns capitalized, whereas Modern English writers and printers of the 17th and 18th century frequently capitalized most and sometimes all nouns, which is still systematically done in Modern German, e.g.

Anglo-Frisian languages

Anglo-FrisianAnglo–FrisianAnglo Frisian
This resulted in Old Norse and Norman language influences on Modern English, whereas Modern Frisian was subject to contact with the southernly Germanic populations, restricted to the continent.

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodinterrogatives

Anglic languages

AnglicEnglishAnglic language
English-based creole languages are not generally included, as only their lexicon, not their linguistic structure, comes from Modern and Early Modern English.

English alphabet

modern English alphabetEnglishalphabet
In the orthography of Modern English, thorn, eth, wynn, yogh, [[æ|ash]], and œ are obsolete.

Latin script

LatinLatin alphabetRoman script
Old English, for example, was rarely written with even proper nouns capitalized; whereas Modern English of the 18th century had frequently all nouns capitalized, in the same way that Modern German is written today, e.g. Alle Schwestern der alten Stadt hatten die Vögel gesehen ("All of the sisters of the old city had seen the birds").

William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
With some differences in vocabulary, texts from the early 17th century, such as the works of William Shakespeare and the King James Bible, are considered to be in Modern English, or more specifically, are referred to as using Early Modern English or Elizabethan English.

King James Version

King James BibleKJVKing James Version of the Bible
With some differences in vocabulary, texts from the early 17th century, such as the works of William Shakespeare and the King James Bible, are considered to be in Modern English, or more specifically, are referred to as using Early Modern English or Elizabethan English.

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth
With some differences in vocabulary, texts from the early 17th century, such as the works of William Shakespeare and the King James Bible, are considered to be in Modern English, or more specifically, are referred to as using Early Modern English or Elizabethan English.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
English was adopted in regions around the world, such as North America, the Indian subcontinent, Africa, Australia and New Zealand through colonisation by the British Empire.