Monarchy in the Canadian provinces

it does in all of Canada's other provincesCrown in right of each provincea provinceCanada's "divisible" CrownCanadian monarch in right of the provinceco-sovereign crownCrowndivided" nature of the CrownHer Majesty the Queen of Canada in Right of Albertain the other provinces
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.wikipedia
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Monarchy of Canada

Queen of CanadaCanadian monarchCanadian Royal Family
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.
In Canada's provinces, the monarch in right of each is represented by a lieutenant governor.

Provinces and territories of Canada

ProvinceCanadian provinceprovincial
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.
In modern Canadian constitutional theory, the provinces are considered to be sovereign within certain areas based on the divisions of responsibility between the provincial and federal government within the Constitution Act 1867, and each province thus has its own representative of the Canadian "Crown", the lieutenant governor.

Premier (Canada)

Premierpremiersprovincial premiers
Unlike with the federal Crown, however, the monarch personally has little direct involvement with the provinces, the exercise of the Royal Prerogative delegated entirely to the lieutenant governors, who are appointed by the governor general on the advice of the Prime Minister of Canada, though usually in consultation with the relevant provincial premier, and the monarch is informed of the prime minister's decision before the governor general gives the viceroyal sign-manual and affixes the Great Seal of Canada to the commission.
The leader of the party which commands a majority in the assembly is then legally appointed the premier by the lieutenant governor, representing the Canadian monarch in right of the province.

List of Canadian royal commissions

Royal CommissionRoyal CommissionsCanadian Royal Commission
Public inquiries are also commissioned by the Queen or governor-in-council through a Royal Warrant, and are called royal commissions.
The Crown in right of each province can also appoint a royal commission, although they are not included in this list.

Crown land

crown landsroyal demesneroyal domain
As such, the monarch is the employer of all provincial government staff (including the viceroys, judges, police officers, and members of the legislative assemblies), the guardian of foster children (Crown wards), as well as the owner of all state lands (Crown land), buildings and equipment (Crown-held property), state-owned companies (Crown Corporations), and the copyright for all government publications (Crown copyright). This is all in his or her position as sovereign, and not as an individual; all such property is inherited by each successive sovereign as possession of the Crown in right of the province in perpetuity and it cannot be sold by the sovereign without the lieutenant governor doing so with the proper advice and consent of his or her ministers.
Though the monarch owns all Crown Land in the country, it is divided in parallel with the "division" of the Crown among the federal and provincial jurisdictions, so that some lands within the provinces are administered by the relevant provincial Crown, whereas others are under the federal Crown.

Republicanism in Canada

republicanismCanada should become a republicCanadian republican
David Smith opined that, by being separated from the monarch by two levels of viceregal representation, the Canadian populace has been made more accepting of the Crown's role in determining who will govern in a minority parliament situation, while Canadian republican leader Tom Freda opposes the system, calling the lieutenant governors "redundant and obsolete", as does Parti Québécois leader Pauline Marois, who opined that the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec is a "waste of money".
His delegation to Ottawa was eventually successful in having the federal Crown-in-Council in 1870 found the province of Manitoba with the same parliamentary constitutional monarchy as existed in the other provinces.

Lieutenant Governor of Quebec

Lieutenant GovernorLieutenant-GovernorLieutenant Governor of Lower Canada
David Smith opined that, by being separated from the monarch by two levels of viceregal representation, the Canadian populace has been made more accepting of the Crown's role in determining who will govern in a minority parliament situation, while Canadian republican leader Tom Freda opposes the system, calling the lieutenant governors "redundant and obsolete", as does Parti Québécois leader Pauline Marois, who opined that the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec is a "waste of money". It is also part of the lieutenant governors' duties (apart from the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec) to bestow provincial honours upon deserving citizens.
Monarchy in the Canadian provinces

Orders, decorations, and medals of the Canadian provinces

provincial honours and decorationsprovincial honoursAlberta's honours
It is also part of the lieutenant governors' duties (apart from the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec) to bestow provincial honours upon deserving citizens.
After the establishment of the Canadian honours system in 1967, the rest of the provinces, recognizing the Crown's distinct operation within each provincial jurisdiction, moved to establish their own honours after Ottawa declined to do so on their behalf.

Lieutenant Governor of Alberta

Lieutenant GovernorLieutenant-GovernorAlberta
Today, though they continue to be appointed and dismissed by the governor general and only the federal parliament may initiate constitutional changes to their role, the lieutenant governors are now considered to be direct representatives of the sovereign, which has accorded them the right to receive audience with the Queen; a practice begun by the Lieutenant Governor of Alberta in 1956.
Monarchy in the Canadian provinces

Oath of Allegiance (Canada)

Oath of AllegianceOath of Allegiance in Canada
As the embodiment of the state, the monarch is at the head of all provincial orders of precedence, and is also the locus of the Oath of Allegiance, which is constitutionally required of members of the legislative assemblies and of the recruits of some provincial police forces, per statute law.
The Members' Manual of the National Assembly outlines that this additional oath is to the people and constitution of Quebec, distinct from the Oath of Allegiance, which is an oath to the country via the Queen, though some saw the monarch, in that context, as representative of the Quebec state and not of Canada, taking into account Canada's "divisible" Crown.

Monarchy in Quebec

Queen in Right of QuebecCrown-in-right-of-QuebecCrown in Right of Quebec
Monarchy in Quebec
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Quebec in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Newfoundland and Labrador

King of the British Dominions Beyond the SeasQueen in Right of Newfoundland and LabradorCrown
Monarchy in Newfoundland and Labrador
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Newfoundland and Labrador in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Prince Edward Island

Queen in Right of Prince Edward IslandQueen Elizabeth II of CanadaMonarch
Monarchy in Prince Edward Island
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Prince Edward Island in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Nova Scotia

Queen in Right of Nova ScotiaHistory of Monarchy in Nova ScotiaMonarch
Monarchy in Nova Scotia
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Nova Scotia in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Saskatchewan

Queen in Right of SaskatchewanQueen Elizabeth II of CanadaSaskatchewan Royal Connections
Monarchy in Saskatchewan
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Saskatchewan in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in New Brunswick

Queen in Right of New BrunswickNew Brunswick CrownMonarch
Monarchy in New Brunswick
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in New Brunswick in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Alberta

Queen in Right of AlbertaAlberta CrownCanadian Crown in right of Alberta
Monarchy in Alberta
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Alberta in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Manitoba

Queen in Right of ManitobaQueen of Canada in Right of ManitobaManitoba Crown
Monarchy in Manitoba
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Manitoba in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in British Columbia

Queen in Right of British ColumbiaCrown in Right of British ColumbiaQueen Elizabeth II
Monarchy in British Columbia
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in British Columbia in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Monarchy in Ontario

Queen in Right of Ontarioprovincial CrownHer Majesty the Queen in Right of Ontario
Monarchy in Ontario
The role of the Crown is both legal and practical; it functions in Ontario in the same way it does in all of Canada's other provinces, being the centre of a constitutional construct in which the institutions of government acting under the sovereign's authority share the power of the whole.

Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island

Lieutenant GovernorPrince Edward IslandGovernor
A bill has not been reserved for the governor general's consideration since 1961; Royal Assent has not been denied since the Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island did so in 1935.
Monarchy in the Canadian provinces

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.

Westminster system

WestminsterWestminster-styleWestminster parliamentary system
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.

Parliamentary system

parliamentaryparliamentarismparliamentary democracy
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.

Democracy

democraticdemocraciesdemocratically
The monarchy of Canada forms the core of each Canadian provincial jurisdiction's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy, being the foundation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in each province.