Monarchy of New Zealand

Queen of New ZealandMonarchKing of the British Dominions Beyond the SeasQueenmonarch of New ZealandSovereignhead of stateHM The QueenQueen Elizabeth IIMonarchy in New Zealand
The monarchy of New Zealand is the constitutional system of government in which a hereditary monarch is the sovereign and head of state of New Zealand.wikipedia
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New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
The monarchy of New Zealand is the constitutional system of government in which a hereditary monarch is the sovereign and head of state of New Zealand.
Queen Elizabeth II is the country's monarch and is represented by a governor-general, currently Dame Patsy Reddy.

New Zealand Parliament

ParliamentParliament of New ZealandHouse of Representatives
All executive authority is vested in the monarch, and royal assent is required for parliament to enact laws and for letters patent and Orders in Council to have legal effect.
The New Zealand Parliament (Pāremata Aotearoa) is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives.

Realm of New Zealand

New Zealandrealmassociated states of New Zealand
Since the monarch resides in the United Kingdom, most of the royal constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand are typically carried out by a viceregal representative, the governor-general of New Zealand. The sovereign of New Zealand also serves as monarch to Cook Islands and Niue, territories in free association with New Zealand within the larger Realm of New Zealand.
The Realm of New Zealand consists of the entire area (or realm) in which the monarch of New Zealand functions as head of state.

Republicanism in New Zealand

New Zealand republicrepublicanismconstitutionally remove British sovereignty
Some New Zealanders think New Zealand should become a republic with a New Zealand resident as the head of state, while others wish to retain the monarchy.
Republicanism in New Zealand is a political position that holds that New Zealand's system of government should be changed from a constitutional monarchy to a republic.

Constitution of New Zealand

constitutionalNew Zealandconstitution
However, the Queen is the only member of the royal family with any constitutional role.
The monarch of New Zealand is the head of state, represented in the Realm of New Zealand by the governor-general, and is the source of executive, judicial and legislative power, although effective power is in the hands of ministers drawn from the democratically elected New Zealand House of Representatives.

Commonwealth realm

Commonwealth realmsrealmsCommonwealth
The person who is the New Zealand monarch is today shared with 15 other countries within the Commonwealth of Nations, all being independent and the monarchy of each legally distinct.

Prime Minister of New Zealand

Prime MinisterPremierNew Zealand Prime Minister
Other powers vested in the monarch, such as the appointment of a prime minister, are significant, but are treated only as reserve powers and as an important security part of the role of the monarchy.
She or he is responsible for chairing meetings of Cabinet; allocating posts to ministers within the government; acting as the spokesperson for the government; and providing advice to the sovereign or the sovereign's representative, the governor-general.

Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-GeneralGovernorGovernor of New Zealand
Since the monarch resides in the United Kingdom, most of the royal constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand are typically carried out by a viceregal representative, the governor-general of New Zealand.
The Governor-General of New Zealand (Te Kāwana Tianara o Aotearoa) is the viceregal representative of the monarch of New Zealand, currently Queen Elizabeth II.

Head of state

heads of stateChief of Stateheads of states
The monarchy of New Zealand is the constitutional system of government in which a hereditary monarch is the sovereign and head of state of New Zealand.

Royal Titles Act 1974

Since the passage of the Royal Titles Act 1974, the monarch's title in New Zealand has been Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God Queen of New Zealand and Her Other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith.
The Royal Titles Act 1974 changed the official title of the Queen of New Zealand to "Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God Queen of New Zealand and Her Other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith".

Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth IIthe QueenQueen
The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, ascended the throne on the death of her father, King George VI, on 6 February 1952.
She became the first reigning monarch of Australia and New Zealand to visit those nations.

Member of parliament

MPMemberMembers of Parliament
Most of the related powers are instead exercised by the elected members of parliament, the ministers of the Crown generally drawn from amongst them, and the judges and justices of the peace.
The New Zealand Parliament is made up of the monarch and the unicameral House of Representatives.

Monarchy New Zealand

Monarchist League of New ZealandMonarchist League
Monarchy New Zealand states "[t]his figure is about one dollar per person per year", about $4.3 million per annum.
Monarchy New Zealand is a national, non-partisan, not-for-profit organisation whose purpose is to promote, support and defend the constitutional monarchy of New Zealand.

Niue

Niue IslandNiue-FekaiNiueans
The sovereign of New Zealand also serves as monarch to Cook Islands and Niue, territories in free association with New Zealand within the larger Realm of New Zealand.
Niueans are citizens of New Zealand, and Queen Elizabeth II is head of state in her capacity as Queen of New Zealand.

Queen's Representative

Queen's Representative of the Cook IslandsActing Queen's Representative of the Cook IslandsQueen's Representative on the Cook Islands
The self-government provisions for the Cook Islands within the Realm of New Zealand allow the Queen to be directly represented as head of state in Cook Islands affairs by the Queen's representative, while the governor-general of New Zealand represents the monarch in matters pertaining to the entire realm.
The Queen's Representative is the formal title given to the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, as Queen of New Zealand, in the Cook Islands.

Administrator of Tokelau

AdministratorActing Administrator of TokelauAdministrators
The administrator of the territory of Tokelau is a government official appointed by New Zealand's minister of foreign affairs to represent the New Zealand Government—not the monarch personally.
The Administrator acts as a representative, not of the Queen personally, but of the New Zealand Government.

Government of New Zealand

New Zealand GovernmentgovernmentNew Zealand
The Government of New Zealand (formally termed Her Majesty's Government ) is defined by the Constitution Act as the monarch acting on the advice of the Executive Council.
Based on the principle of responsible government, it operates within the framework that "the Queen reigns, but the government rules, so long as it has the support of the House of Representatives".

New Zealand House of Representatives

House of RepresentativesParliamentMP
The Crown is further responsible for summoning and dissolving the House of Representatives, after which the governor-general usually calls for a general election.
The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor-General).

Independence of New Zealand

independenceNew Zealand independencean independent country of its own
New Zealand gradually became independent from Britain and the monarchy evolved to become a distinctly New Zealand institution, represented by unique symbols.
Thus, although the monarch of the United Kingdom remains also the monarch of New Zealand this person acts in a distinct capacity as sovereign of each.

Oath of Citizenship (New Zealand)

Oath of Citizenshipoath of allegiance
As the embodiment of the state, the monarch is the locus of Oaths of Allegiance, required of many employees of the Crown, as well as by new citizens, as per the Oath of Citizenship laid out in the Citizenship Act.
The Oath of Citizenship, as opposed to the Oath of Allegiance, is for new New Zealand citizens to pledge loyalty to the Queen of New Zealand, Elizabeth II, and faithfully observe to the laws of New Zealand.

Tokelau

Tokelau IslandsUnion IslandsTK
The administrator of the territory of Tokelau is a government official appointed by New Zealand's minister of foreign affairs to represent the New Zealand Government—not the monarch personally.
The head of state is Elizabeth II, the Queen in right of New Zealand, who also reigns over the other Commonwealth realms.

Cook Islands

Cook IslandCookThe Cook Islands
The sovereign of New Zealand also serves as monarch to Cook Islands and Niue, territories in free association with New Zealand within the larger Realm of New Zealand.
The head of state is the Queen of New Zealand, who is represented in the Cook Islands by the Queen's Representative.

Treaty of Waitangi

Te Tiriti o WaitangiTreatyThe Treaty of Waitangi
The Treaty of Waitangi between Queen Victoria and Māori was signed in 1840, and as a result, the British sovereign became New Zealand's head of state.
However, the Tribunal's findings do not establish that the Crown does not have sovereignty today, since the Crown has de facto sovereignty in New Zealand regardless and the Tribunal has no authority to rule otherwise.

Minister of the Crown

ministers of the Crownministerministers
Most of the related powers are instead exercised by the elected members of parliament, the ministers of the Crown generally drawn from amongst them, and the judges and justices of the peace.

New Zealand Police

PoliceNew Zealand Police ForceNZ Police
As part of a Commonwealth-wide tour for her Silver Jubilee, Elizabeth was in New Zealand from 22 February to 7 March 1977; she made a brief visit, between 12 and 20 October 1981, following a Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Melbourne; marked the centennial of the New Zealand Police during a tour from 22 February to 2 March 1986; the Queen closed the Commonwealth Games in Auckland and, with her son, Prince Edward, took part in events marking the sesquicentennial of the Treaty of Waitangi between 1 and 16 February 1990; between 1 and 10 November 1995, she attended the CHOGM in Auckland and opened the newly refurbished parliament buildings; and, as part of her global tour for her Golden Jubilee, Elizabeth was in New Zealand from 22 to 27 February 2002.
While the New Zealand Police is a government department with a minister responsible for it, the commissioner and sworn members swear allegiance directly to the Sovereign and, by convention, have constabulary independence from the government of the day.