Monarchy of the United Kingdom

MonarchBritish monarchQueen of the United KingdomBritish monarchyMonarch of the United KingdomQueenKing of the United KingdomSovereignKingBritish Crown
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies (the Bailiwick of Guernsey, the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Isle of Man) and its overseas territories.wikipedia
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United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies (the Bailiwick of Guernsey, the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Isle of Man) and its overseas territories.
The current monarch is Queen Elizabeth II, who has reigned since 1952, making her the world's longest-serving current head of state.

Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth IIthe QueenQueen
The current monarch and head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who ascended the throne in 1952.
Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the queen of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms.

British Overseas Territories

British Overseas Territoryoverseas territoryoverseas territories
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies (the Bailiwick of Guernsey, the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Isle of Man) and its overseas territories.
They all share the British monarch (Elizabeth II) as head of state.

Jersey

Bailiwick of JerseyIsle of JerseyIsland of Jersey
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies (the Bailiwick of Guernsey, the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Isle of Man) and its overseas territories.
Jersey has a separate relationship to the Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man, although all are held by the monarch of the United Kingdom.

Commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces

Commander-in-ChiefHead
The monarch is commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces.
The commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces, also referred to as commander in chief of the armed forces of the Crown, is a constitutional role vested in the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II, who as head of state is the "Head of the Armed Forces".

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Great Britain
As the monarchy is constitutional, the monarch is limited to non-partisan functions such as bestowing honours and appointing the prime minister.
The Prime Minister directs both the executive and the legislature, and, together with the Prime Minister's Cabinet, (consisting of all the most senior ministers, most of whom are government department heads), is accountable to the Monarch, to Parliament, to his or her's political party and, ultimately, to the electorate for the policies and actions of the executive and the legislature.

British Armed Forces

British militaryForcesarmed forces
The monarch is commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces.
Its Commander-in-chief is the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II, to whom members of the forces swear allegiance.

George VI

King George VIGeorge VI of the United KingdomDuke of York
George VI and his successor, Elizabeth II, adopted the title Head of the Commonwealth as a symbol of the free association of its independent member states.
George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was king of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death.

British Empire

BritishEmpireBritain
The British monarch was the nominal head of the vast British Empire, which covered a quarter of the world's surface at its greatest extent in 1921.
The United Kingdom is now one of 16 Commonwealth nations, a grouping known informally as the Commonwealth realms, that share a monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II.

Act of Settlement 1701

Act of SettlementHanoverian successionAct of Settlement, 1701
The Act of Settlement 1701 excluded Roman Catholics, or those who married them, from succession to the English throne.
Along with the Bill of Rights 1689, the Act of Settlement remains today one of the main constitutional laws governing the succession not only to the throne of the United Kingdom, but to those of the other Commonwealth realms, whether by assumption or by patriation.

Parliament of the United Kingdom

ParliamentUK ParliamentBritish Parliament
Parliament is bicameral but has three parts, consisting of the Sovereign (Queen-in-Parliament), the House of Lords, and the House of Commons (the primary chamber).

List of titles and honours of Elizabeth II

List of titles and honours of Queen Elizabeth IIQueen Elizabeth IIa unique Barbadian title
Although the monarch is shared, each country is sovereign and independent of the others, and the monarch has a different, specific, and official national title and style for each realm.

House of Lords

LordsBritish House of LordsThe House of Lords
Of the Lords Temporal, the majority are life peers who are appointed by the monarch on the advice of the Prime Minister, or on the advice of the House of Lords Appointments Commission.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
Religious upheaval and disputes with the Pope led the monarch to break from the Roman Catholic Church and to establish the Church of England (the Anglican Church).
The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
In 1707, the kingdoms of England and Scotland were merged to create the Kingdom of Great Britain, and in 1801, the Kingdom of Ireland joined to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
This disposition changed dramatically when the Acts of Union 1707 came into force, with a single unified Crown of Great Britain and a single unified parliament.

Commonwealth realm

Commonwealth realmsrealmsCommonwealth
The United Kingdom and fifteen other independent sovereign states that share the same person as their monarch are called Commonwealth realms.
Although the Dominions were capable of governing themselves internally, they technically remained—especially in regard to foreign policy and defence—subject to British authority, wherein the governor-general of each Dominion represented the British monarch-in-Council reigning over these territories as a single imperial domain.

Head of the Commonwealth

HeadCommonwealthHeadship of the Commonwealth
George VI and his successor, Elizabeth II, adopted the title Head of the Commonwealth as a symbol of the free association of its independent member states.
Subsequently, many other nations including Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and Singapore ceased to recognise the monarch of the United Kingdom as their respective head of state, but as members of the Commonwealth of Nations recognised the British monarch as Head of the Commonwealth.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom

Privy CouncilPCPrivy Counsellor
The monarch acts within the constraints of convention and precedent, exercising prerogative only on the advice of ministers responsible to Parliament, often through the prime minister or Privy Council.
Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, commonly known as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or simply the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom.

Government of the United Kingdom

British GovernmentUK GovernmentGovernment
After an election, the monarch (currently Queen Elizabeth II) selects as prime minister the leader of the party most likely to command the confidence of the House of Commons, usually by possessing a majority of MPs.

Head of state

heads of stateChief of Stateheads of states
The current monarch and head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who ascended the throne in 1952.
The last time the prime minister of the United Kingdom was unilaterally selected by the monarch was in 1963, when Queen Elizabeth II appointed Alec Douglas-Home on the advice of outgoing Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.

First Minister of Scotland

First MinisterScottish First MinisterScotland's First Minister
The sovereign appoints the First Minister of Scotland on the nomination of the Scottish Parliament, and the First Minister of Wales on the nomination of the National Assembly for Wales.
The First Minister is a Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) and nominated by the Scottish Parliament before being officially appointed by the monarch.

Constitutional monarchy

constitutional monarchiesconstitutional monarchconstitutional
The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom, its dependencies (the Bailiwick of Guernsey, the Bailiwick of Jersey and the Isle of Man) and its overseas territories.
Today slightly more than a quarter of constitutional monarchies are Western European countries, including the United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Denmark, Luxembourg, Monaco, Liechtenstein and Sweden.

Order in Council

Orders in CouncilOrder-in-CouncilOrders-in-Council
In the United Kingdom orders are formally made in the name of the Queen by the Privy Council (Queen-in-Council).

Lascelles Principles

In 1950 the King's Private Secretary Sir Alan "Tommy" Lascelles, writing pseudonymously to The Times newspaper asserted a constitutional convention: according to the Lascelles Principles, if a minority government asked to dissolve Parliament to call an early election to strengthen its position, the monarch could refuse, and would do so under three conditions.

Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland SecretarySecretary of StateNorthern Ireland
The sovereign can veto any law passed by the Northern Ireland Assembly, if it is deemed unconstitutional by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.
As with other ministers, the position is appointed by the British monarch on the advice of the prime minister.