A report on Monastery

Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain. Built in 1563–1584.
New Valamo, an Eastern Orthodox monastery in Heinävesi, Finland.
Hongan monastery in Kyoto, Japan.
The Plan of Saint Gall, the ground plan of an unbuilt abbey, providing for all of the needs of the monks within the confines of the monastery walls
Asta Nørregaard: Christmas Night Mass celebrated in a French Nunnery (1889)
Abbey of Monte Cassino, originally built by Benedict of Nursia, shown here as rebuilt after World War II
Buckfast Abbey, Devon, England, and its surrounding monastery, were rebuilt in the 20th century.
Hindu matha, Vidyasankara Temple
Parakala Mutt - as it stands today
Ukhra Nimbarka Peeth Mahanta Asthal
Part of Ganden Monastery, Tibet in 1921. Tsongkhapa's tomb is in the center left.
Thiksey Monastery in Ladakh, India
Rumtek Monastery, Gangtok, Sikkim, India
Tango Monastery, Bhutan
Mor Gabriel Monastery was founded in 397 by Mor Shmu'el and his student Mor Shem'un.
The Mor Hananyo Monastery, one of the many monasteries of Mount Izla
Monastery of Saint Athanasius, Bulgaria, was the first Christian monastery established in Europe in 344.
Monasterio de San Francisco in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, was the first and oldest monastery built in the Americas.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/526|title=Colonial City of Santo Domingo. Outstanding Universal Value|website=UNESCO World Heritage Centre website}}</ref>
The Monastery of Santa María del Parral of the Hieronymites monks in Segovia, Spain
Melk Abbey, Austria
Passionist Monastery in Monte Argentario, Tuscany, Italy
Bassac Abbey (12th -18th centuries), Bassac, Charente, France
Saint Catherine's Monastery on Mount Sinai, early 6th century.
Trinity Monastery in Chernihiv, Ukraine, was reconstructed in 1649.
Simonopetra monastery on Mount Athos
Rila monastery in Bulgaria, UNESCO World Heritage Site
Manasija monastery in central Serbia
The Sumela Monastery, south of Trabzon in Eastern Turkey. Built in 4th century (estimated 386 AD).
Pühtitsa Convent in Estonia from 19th century
Dayro d-Mor Mattai was founded in 363 by the hermit Mar Mattai who had fled persecution in Amid under the Roman Emperor Julian the Apostate.
Debre Damo was founded in the 6th century in Ethiopia.

Building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone .

- Monastery
Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain. Built in 1563–1584.

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Portrait depicting a Catholic monk of the Carthusian Order (1446)

Monk

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Person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks.

Person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks.

Portrait depicting a Catholic monk of the Carthusian Order (1446)
Buddhist monks collecting alms
Buddhist monks in Thailand.
Monk resting outside Thag-Thok Gompa, Ladakh
Buddhist monks performing ceremony in Hangzhou, China.
Painting of a Franciscan monk, shown with a traditional tonsure hairstyle
A Basilian monk
The nave of the church at Jasna Góra Monastery, one of the last monasteries run by the Order of Saint Paul the First Hermit
The cloister of Lehnin Abbey, a former Cistercian monastery
Munich's city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—and the origin of its name
Loccum Abbey continued as a Lutheran monastery since the 16th century A.D.
Monastery of St. Dionysius on Mount Athos.
General view of Holy Trinity-Makaryev Monastery, on the Volga River in Nizhny Novgorod Oblast, Russia.
Monk near Saint Petersburg, Soviet Union (c., 1931) by a traveler DeCou, Branson.
The Great Schema worn by Orthodox monks and nuns of the most advanced degree
Acharya Vidyasagar, a possessionless and detached Digambara Jain monk
A prominent Digambar Jain monk
Five Mahavratas of Jain ascetics
White-clothed Acharya Kalaka

Within Catholicism, a monk is a member of a religious order who lives a communal life in a monastery, abbey, or priory under a monastic rule of life (such as the Rule of St. Benedict).

St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict and foundress of the Benedictine nuns

Nun

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St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict and foundress of the Benedictine nuns
Hildegard of Bingen and her nuns
Maria Johanna Baptista von Zweyer, Abbess of the Cistercian abbey of Wald
Three Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul in the Portal of a Church, by Armand Gautier
Bridgettine Sisters at the March For Life in Washington, D.C., January 2009
Mother Teresa, founder of the Missionaries of Charity
Saint Sophia of Suzdal, wearing the full monastic habit of a Schemanun
Nun in Gradac, Serbian orthodox monastery
Ebstorf Abbey has continued as a Lutheran convent in the Benedictine tradition since 1529.
Two Anglican nuns
Two Birgitta sisters in Sweden 2019.
Bursfelde Abbey has continued as a Lutheran convent since A.D. 1579
A Chinese nun ascending steps on Mount Putuo Shan island
Sister Rosália Sehnem of the Sisters of St. Francis of Penance and Christian Charity
A sister of the Theresienne Sisters of Basankusu wearing a brightly coloured habit, riding a motor-bike, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2013<ref>The Theresienne Sisters of Basankusu (La congrégation des soeurs thérésiennes de Basankusu)</ref>
A Ugandan nun teaching during a community service day
Bridgettine Sisters at the March For Life in Washington, D.C., January 2009

A nun is a woman who vows to dedicate her life to religious service, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery or convent.

Forest dwelling was a common practice in early Buddhism, and it is still followed by some Buddhist sects such as the Thai Forest Tradition.

Monasticism

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Religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work.

Religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work.

Forest dwelling was a common practice in early Buddhism, and it is still followed by some Buddhist sects such as the Thai Forest Tradition.
Young Buddhist bhikkhus in Tibet
Trappist monk praying in his cell.
The Monastery of Saint Anthony in Egypt, built over the tomb of Saint Anthony, the "Father of Christian Monasticism"
Coptic monks between 1898 and 1914
A meeting of various Shankaracharya - heads of monasteries called mathas in the Advaita Vedanta tradition. The title derives from Adi Shankara, an 8th-century CE reformer of Hinduism.
Digambara Jain monks renounce all clothing.
China's Wudang Mountains is a center of Taoist monasticism and the practice of Tai chi.

Many monastics live in abbeys, convents, monasteries or priories to separate themselves from the secular world, unless they are in mendicant or missionary orders.

The cloister of Sénanque Abbey, Provence

Abbey

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The cloister of Sénanque Abbey, Provence
Church of the former Bath Abbey, Somerset
An interior of the Bridgettine's Nådendal Abbey, a medieval Catholic monastery in Naantali, Finland
Abbey of St Catherine, Mount Sinai
The Abbey of Monte Cassino
The church of the Abbey of St Gall
The remains of the church of Shrewsbury Abbey
Cloisters, Westminster Abbey
Abbey of Cluny in lights
Interior facing east, Paisley Abbey
The nave of St Botolph's Priory, Colchester
Cistercian Abbey of Sénanque
Cistercian Abbey of Sénanque
Jumièges Abbey, Normandy
The Abbey of Monte Cassino

An abbey is a type of monastery used by members of a religious order under the governance of an abbot or abbess.

Nave and organ of the Cathédrale Sainte-Cécile d'Albi in Southern France

Cathedral

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Church that contains the cathedra of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.

Church that contains the cathedra of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.

Nave and organ of the Cathédrale Sainte-Cécile d'Albi in Southern France
São Paulo Cathedral, a representative modern cathedral built in Neo-Gothic style.
Interior of St. Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, Memphis, Tennessee with a procession.
The cathedra of the Pope as Bishop of Rome, Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran
The Cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta is a Neoclassical Catholic cathedral in Nepi, Italy
Many cathedrals, such as the Notre-Dame de Paris, France, feature highly detailed stained glass windows
Most cathedrals, such as the Cologne Cathedral, Germany, serve as city landmarks
Battistero di San Giovanni in Pisa, Italy
The Palais de la Berbie, an episcopal palace in Albi, France
St. Martin's cathedral in Spišské Podhradie (Slovakia).
Bishop Ivo Muser in Urtijëi with pontifical vestments (mitre, pectoral cross, episcopal ring, and crosier)
St. John's Cathedral in Brisbane
The Patriarchal Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran, Rome.
Former archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams.
Aachen Cathedral, Germany, founded by Charlemagne in 800 AD, coronation place of the Holy Roman Emperor.
The cloister of Canterbury Cathedral with monastic buildings beyond
Nidaros Cathedral, Norway, became Lutheran at the Reformation
Metz Cathedral, France, was governed by a provost.
Chapter House of Oulu Cathedral, Finland
The stalls of St. Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny, Ireland, showing the bishop's throne and precentor's stall.
Interior of the Chapter House at Southwell Cathedral, England.
The 15th-century Porvoo Cathedral in Porvoo, Finland is quite well known from the Diet of Porvoo, when Tsar Alexander I of the Russian Empire granted Finland the status of Grand Duchy in 1809.
The Palace of the Bishops of Havelberg in Wittstock, Germany.
Many cathedrals are important landmarks. Cobh Cathedral, Ireland, rises up above the town.
Built at the beginning of the 19th century, the Neoclassical Kuopio Cathedral is one of the most important landmarks in Kuopio, which has also been immortalized in the city's coat of arms. Photo of the cathedral in winter 2019.
St. Mary's Cathedral, Sydney has a typical cruciform plan.
Music is an important part of cathedral services. Choir practice at York Minster, England.
Organ of Sonntagberg Basilica, Lower Austria
The baptismal font at Lübeck Cathedral, Germany
The funeral of the Patriarch Alexy II in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour, Moscow
Cathedrals are important meeting places. After a service at Ss. Peter and Paul Cathedral, Sri Lanka
Some cathedrals are major tourist destinations and World Heritage Sites. Pisa is one of the best known.
Cathedrals often contain a wealth of artworks. Tourists visiting the interior of St. Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna.
Many cathedrals are pilgrimage destinations. Santiago de Compostela, Spain, is one of the most famous.
Chartres Cathedral, France, a famous landmark that draws both pilgrims and art lovers.

Church buildings embodying the functions of a cathedral first appeared in Italy, Gaul, Spain, and North Africa in the 4th century, but cathedrals did not become universal within the Western Catholic Church until the 12th century, by which time they had developed architectural forms, institutional structures, and legal identities distinct from parish churches, monastic churches, and episcopal residences.

St. Dominic of Silos enthroned as abbot (Hispano-Flemish Gothic 15th century)

Abbot

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St. Dominic of Silos enthroned as abbot (Hispano-Flemish Gothic 15th century)
Coptic icon of Saint Pachomius, the founder of cenobitic monasticism
Carving of Saint Benedict of Nursia, holding an abbot's crozier and his Rule for Monasteries (Münsterschwarzach, Germany)
Thomas Schoen, abbot of Bornem Abbey
Benedictine Archabbot Schober in prelate's dress and cappa magna
Arms of a Roman Catholic abbot are distinguished by a gold crozier with a veil attached and a black galero with twelve tassels (the galero of a territorial abbot would be green)
Abbot Francis Michael and Prior Anthony Delisi (on the left) of Monastery of the Holy Spirit, a Trappist monastery in Conyers, Georgia, US.
"The Abbot", from the Dance of Death, by Hans Holbein the Younger

Abbot is an ecclesiastical title given to the male head of a monastery in various Western religious traditions, including Christianity.

Carthusians

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The Carthusians, also known as the Order of Carthusians (Ordo Cartusiensis), are a Latin enclosed religious order of the Catholic Church.

The Carthusians, also known as the Order of Carthusians (Ordo Cartusiensis), are a Latin enclosed religious order of the Catholic Church.

Painting by Sebastiano Ricci (1659–1734) depicting the founder of the Carthusians, Bruno of Cologne (c. 1030-1101), revering Mary, mother of Jesus and adoring the Christ Child, with Hugh of Lincoln (1135–1200) looking on in the background.
Carthusian monk depicted in Petrus Christus's painting Portrait of a Carthusian.
A typical Carthusian plan: Clermont, drawn by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, 1856.
The Grande Chartreuse is the head monastery of the Carthusian order.
Painting from the Carthusian cloister of Nuestra Señora de las Cuevas in Seville by Francisco de Zurbarán. The scene depicts Hugh of Grenoble in a Carthusian monastery.

These names were adapted to the English charterhouse, meaning a Carthusian monastery.

Coptic icon of Pachomius the Great, the founder of Christian cenobitic monasticism

Cenobitic monasticism

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Coptic icon of Pachomius the Great, the founder of Christian cenobitic monasticism
The groundplan of the monastery of St. Gall in Switzerland, providing for all of the needs of the monks within the confines of the monastery walls

Cenobitic (or coenobitic) monasticism is a monastic tradition that stresses community life.

St. Paul the Hermit Fed by the Raven, after Il Guercino (17th century), Dayton Art Institute

Christian monasticism

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Devotional practice of Christians who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship.

Devotional practice of Christians who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship.

St. Paul the Hermit Fed by the Raven, after Il Guercino (17th century), Dayton Art Institute
Nun profession ceremony for a new nun, admitted to the cloister (behind the half door).
Icon of Saint Anthony the Great, the founder of Christian monasticism
Jovinian was the most influental early opponent of monasticism
Analavos worn by Eastern Orthodox Schema-Monks.
Konstantin Savitsky, monk 1897
Orthodox monks farming potatoes in Russia, c. 1910
St. Anthony of Kiev wearing the Great Schema.
Clonmacnois Round Tower
Saint Benedict by Herman Nieg, Heiligenkreuz Abbey, Austria
Loccum Abbey has been a Lutheran monastery since the 16th century A.D.
A monastery in Hronský Beňadik (Slovakia).
The hospital at Soutra Aisle.

Monastics generally dwell in a monastery, whether they live there in a community (cenobites), or in seclusion (recluses).

The Priory de Graville, France

Priory

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The Priory de Graville, France

A priory is a monastery of men or women under religious vows that is headed by a prior or prioress.