Money

monetaryspeciecashfunctions of moneycurrencymonetary economicsmonetary systempecuniarydoughgeld
Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context.wikipedia
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Debt

debtsprincipalborrowing
Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context. Instead, non-monetary societies operated largely along the principles of gift economy and debt.
Debt is when something, usually money, is owed by one party, the borrower or debtor, to a second party, the lender or creditor.

Medium of exchange

mediums of exchangeexchange mediumfreely exchangeable for goods
The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment.
Medium of exchange is one of the three fundamental functions of money in mainstream economics.

Commodity money

speciecommoditycommodity standard
Money is historically an emergent market phenomenon establishing a commodity money, but nearly all contemporary money systems are based on fiat money.
Commodity money is money whose value comes from a commodity of which it is made.

Standard of deferred payment

deferred payment periodrepaid
The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment.
In economics standard of deferred payment is a function of money.

Unit of account

money of accountunits of accountaccounting currency
The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment.
In economics, unit of account is one of the functions of money.

Store of value

stores of valuea firm foundationput
The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment.
The most common store of value in modern times has been money, currency, or a commodity like a precious metal or financial capital.

Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
A currency (from, "in circulation", from currens, -entis), in the most specific use of the word, refers to money in any form when in actual use or circulation as a medium of exchange, especially circulating banknotes and coins.

Payment

compensationpaymentspayee
Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context.
The most common means of payment involve use of money, cheque, or debit, credit or bank transfers.

Gift economy

gift exchangegift economiesgift
Instead, non-monetary societies operated largely along the principles of gift economy and debt.
Gifts are not given in an explicit exchange of goods or services for money or some other commodity.

Shell money

cowriesnzimbushells
Societies in the Americas, Asia, Africa and Australia used shell money – often, the shells of the cowry (Cypraea moneta L. or C. annulus L.). According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to introduce the use of gold and silver coins.
Shell money is a medium of exchange similar to coin money and other forms of commodity money, and was once commonly used in many parts of the world.

Barter

barter economybarteringbarter trade
The use of barter-like methods may date back to at least 100,000 years ago, though there is no evidence of a society or economy that relied primarily on barter.
In trade, barter (derived from baretor ) is a system of exchange where participants in a transaction directly exchange goods or services for other goods or services without using a medium of exchange, such as money.

Broad money

broader measures
Bank money, which consists only of records (mostly computerized in modern banking), forms by far the largest part of broad money in developed countries.
In economics, broad money is a term denoting a certain measure of the amount of money (of the money supply) in a national economy, and it is used depending on the local practice.

Coin

coinsspecieexergue
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
Other coins are used as money in everyday transactions, circulating alongside banknotes.

Gold standard

goldgold exchange standardbacked by gold
The gold standard, a monetary system where the medium of exchange are paper notes that are convertible into pre-set, fixed quantities of gold, replaced the use of gold coins as currency in the 17th–19th centuries in Europe.
Various commodities have been used as money; typically, the one that loses the least value over time becomes the accepted form.

Monetary system

monetary standardcurrency systemsbacked
The gold standard, a monetary system where the medium of exchange are paper notes that are convertible into pre-set, fixed quantities of gold, replaced the use of gold coins as currency in the 17th–19th centuries in Europe.
A monetary system is the set of institutions by which a government provides money in a country's economy.

United States dollar

$US$USD
After World War II and the Bretton Woods Conference, most countries adopted fiat currencies that were fixed to the U.S. dollar.
There, "dollars" is a reference to the Spanish milled dollar, a coin that had a monetary value of 8 Spanish units of currency, or reales.

Transaction account

checkingchecking accountchecking accounts
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
Cash (deposit and withdrawal of coins and banknotes at a branch)

Savings account

Savingssavings accountssaving account
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
A savings account is a deposit account held at a retail bank that pays interest but cannot be used directly as money in the narrow sense of a medium of exchange (for example, by writing a cheque).

Moneta

monet.
The temple of Juno Moneta at Rome was the place where the mint of Ancient Rome was located.
In Roman mythology, Moneta (Latin Monēta) was a title given to two separate goddesses: the goddess of memory (identified with the Greek goddess Mnemosyne) and an epithet of Juno, called Juno Moneta (Latin Iūno Monēta). The latter's name is source of numerous words in English and the Romance languages, including the words "money" and "mint".

Demand deposit

bank moneydemand depositscredit
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
These account balances are usually considered money and form the greater part of the narrowly defined money supply of a country.

Price system

pricing systemmonetary prices
Examples of commodities that have been used as mediums of exchange include gold, silver, copper, rice, Wampum, salt, peppercorns, large stones, decorated belts, shells, alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, candy, etc. These items were sometimes used in a metric of perceived value in conjunction to one another, in various commodity valuation or price system economies.
In economics, a price system is a component of any economic system that uses prices expressed in any form of money for the valuation and distribution of goods and services and the factors of production.

Numismatics

numismaticnumismatistnumismatists
Archimedes' principle provided the next link: coins could now be easily tested for their fine weight of metal, and thus the value of a coin could be determined, even if it had been shaved, debased or otherwise tampered with (see Numismatics).
While numismatists are often characterised as students or collectors of coins, the discipline also includes the broader study of money and other payment media used to resolve debts and the exchange of goods.

Banknote

paper moneybanknotespaper currency
The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts).
A note is a promise to redeem later for some other object of value, usually specie.

Gold coin

gold coinsgoldgold piece
Societies in the Americas, Asia, Africa and Australia used shell money – often, the shells of the cowry (Cypraea moneta L. or C. annulus L.). According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to introduce the use of gold and silver coins.
Gold has been used as money for many reasons.

Monetary economics

monetary theorymonetary economymonetary
At around the same time in the medieval Islamic world, a vigorous monetary economy was created during the 7th–12th centuries on the basis of the expanding levels of circulation of a stable high-value currency (the dinar).
It provides a framework for analyzing money and considers its functions, such as medium of exchange, store of value and unit of account.