Moneyball

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Gamebookbook of the same namenovelnonfiction book of the same name2003 book2003 book of the same namea true storyBeane's ListMoneyball draft
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane.wikipedia
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Michael Lewis

Lewis, MichaelMichael M. LewisAgainst the Rules with Michael Lewis
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane.
, Lewis has published 18 books, three of which—Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (2003), The Blind Side (2006) and The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (2010)—have been adapted into feature films.

Moneyball (film)

Moneyballfilm adaptation2011 film
A film based on the book, starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill, was released in 2011.
The film is based on Michael Lewis's 2003 nonfiction book of the same name, an account of the Oakland Athletics baseball team's 2002 season and their general manager Billy Beane's attempts to assemble a competitive team.

Billy Beane

Bill Beane
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane.
He is the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book on baseball economics, Moneyball, which was made into a 2011 film starring Brad Pitt as Beane.

2002 Oakland Athletics season

Oakland Athletics20022002 Oakland Athletics
By re-evaluating their strategy in this way, the 2002 Athletics, with approximately $44 million in salary, were competitive with larger market teams such as the New York Yankees, who spent over $125 million in payroll that season.
The Athletics' season was the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Lewis was given the opportunity to follow the team around throughout the season).

2002 Major League Baseball draft

20022002 MLB draft2002 draft
Lewis explores the A's approach to the 2002 MLB draft, when the team had a run of early picks.
It is featured in Michael Lewis' 2003 book Moneyball.

Paul DePodesta

Peter Brand
When the Mets hired Sandy Alderson – Beane's predecessor and mentor with the A's – as their general manager after the 2010 season, and hired Beane's former associates Paul DePodesta and J.P. Ricciardi to the front office, the team was jokingly referred to as the "Moneyball Mets".
He is also known for his appearance in the book and movie Moneyball, about his time with the Athletics.

Jeremy Bonderman

BondermanBonderman, Jeremy
Lewis cites A's minor leaguer Jeremy Bonderman, drafted out of high school in 2001 over Beane's objections, as an example of the type of draft pick Beane would avoid.
Bonderman was drafted by the Oakland Athletics out of high school with the 26th pick in the 2001 Major League Baseball Draft, a selection that, according to Michael Lewis's Moneyball, caused Athletics general manager Billy Beane to throw a chair through a wall in fury.

Daryl Morey

Daryl Morey's own unorthodox approaches in the NBA have been called "Moreyball".
This style has been dubbed "Moreyball", as a nod towards Michael Lewis's Moneyball.

Sabermetrics

sabermetricsabermetriciansabermetricians
Its focus is the team's analytical, evidence-based, sabermetric approach to assembling a competitive baseball team despite Oakland's small budget.
His approaches to baseball soon gained national recognition when Michael Lewis published Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game in 2003 to detail Beane's use of Sabermetrics.

Brad Pitt

BradBrad Pitt’sfamous namesake
A film based on the book, starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill, was released in 2011.
In a performance that attracted strong praise, he portrayed the Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane in the drama Moneyball, which is based on the 2003 book of the same name written by Michael Lewis.

Bill James

James, BillBaseball AbstractBill James Online
Moneyball traces the history of the sabermetric movement back to such people as Bill James (now a member of the Boston Red Sox front office) and Craig R. Wright.
Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane began applying sabermetric principles to running his low-budget team in the early 2000s, to notable effect, as chronicled in Michael Lewis' book Moneyball.

Kevin Youkilis

Kevin "The Greek God of Walks" Youkilis
Known for his ability to get on base, while he was still a minor leaguer, Youkilis was nicknamed Euclis: The Greek God of Walks in the best-selling book, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game.

Chad Bradford

Bradford
This led to him figuring prominently in the Michael Lewis book Moneyball, which in 2011 was made into the film of the same title.

Jeremy Brown

He is also known for his place in Michael Lewis' 2003 #1 bestseller Moneyball.

Mark Teahen

He was one of the featured players in the book Moneyball, which claimed that he had the potential to become the next Jason Giambi.

Joe Blanton

Blanton
The Oakland Athletics selected Blanton in the first round, with the 24th overall selection, of the 2002 Major League Baseball draft, This draft was chronicled by Michael Lewis in his book, Moneyball.

Jürgen Klopp

Jurgen KloppJürgen Klopp’sKlopp
The mathematical model turned out to be that of Cambridge physicist Ian Graham, which was used to select the manager (Jürgen Klopp) and players essential for Liverpool to win the 2018-19 UEFA Champions League.
According to El País, Liverpool co-owner John W. Henry didn't trust public opinion so he looked for a mathematical method very similar to Moneyball, the approach that Henry used for the Boston Red Sox in guiding them to three World Series wins, which he also owns via Fenway Sports Group.

Oakland Athletics

Oakland AAthleticsPhiladelphia Athletics
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a book by Michael Lewis, published in 2003, about the Oakland Athletics baseball team and its general manager Billy Beane.
The 2003 Michael Lewis book Moneyball chronicles the 2002 Oakland Athletics season, with a specific focus on Billy Beane's economic approach to managing the organization under significant financial constraints.

Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
Its focus is the team's analytical, evidence-based, sabermetric approach to assembling a competitive baseball team despite Oakland's small budget.
Among the celebrated nonfiction books in the field are Lawrence S. Ritter's The Glory of Their Times, Roger Kahn's The Boys of Summer, and Michael Lewis's Moneyball.

John W. Henry

John HenryHenry, JohnJohn W Henry
Beane has held discussions with Wenger, former Manchester United F.C. manager Sir Alex Ferguson, and Liverpool F.C. owner John W. Henry.
He also hired baseball sabermetrics pioneer Bill James, whose work became widely known following the publication of Moneyball in 2003.

John Baker (baseball)

John BakerBaker
He was mentioned several times in Michael Lewis' 2003 book Moneyball.

Nick Swisher

Swisher, and the Athletics' 2002 draft, are heavily featured in Michael Lewis' 2003 book Moneyball.

Slugging percentage

slugging averageSLGslugging
Rigorous statistical analysis had demonstrated that on-base percentage and slugging percentage are better indicators of offensive success, and the A's became convinced that these qualities were cheaper to obtain on the open market than more historically valued qualities such as speed and contact.

Jim Mecir

Mecir
He spent 4½ years as a member of the Oakland Athletics and is prominently mentioned in Michael Lewis's bestselling book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game.

On-base percentage

OBPOn Base Percentageon base average
Rigorous statistical analysis had demonstrated that on-base percentage and slugging percentage are better indicators of offensive success, and the A's became convinced that these qualities were cheaper to obtain on the open market than more historically valued qualities such as speed and contact.