Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus'

Mongol invasion of Rus'Mongol invasion of RusMongol invasionTatar YokeMongol invasion of RussiaMongolsMongol yokeMongol invasionsMongolMongol conquest
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.wikipedia
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Kiev

KyivKiev, UkraineKyiv, Ukraine
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.
Completely destroyed during the Mongol invasions in 1240, the city lost most of its influence for the centuries to come.

Kievan Rus'

Kievan RusRus'Rus
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.
The state finally fell to the Mongol invasion of the 1240s.

Golden Horde

Kipchak KhanateUlus of JochiHorde
All Rus' principalities were forced to submit to Mongol rule and became part of the Golden Horde empire, some of which lasted until 1480.
These internal struggles allowed the northern vassal state of Muscovy to rid itself of the "Tatar Yoke" at the Great Stand on the Ugra River in 1480.

Russia

Russian FederationRUSRussian
The invasion, facilitated by the beginning of the breakup of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, had incalculable ramifications for the history of Eastern Europe, including the division of the East Slavic people into three separate nations: modern-day Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, and the rise of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.
Rus ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century.

Moscow

Moscow, RussiaMoscow, Soviet UnionMoskva
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.
In the course of the Mongol invasion of Rus, the Mongols under Batu Khan burned the city to the ground and killed its inhabitants.

Grand Duchy of Moscow

MuscovyMuscoviteMuscovite Russia
The invasion, facilitated by the beginning of the breakup of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, had incalculable ramifications for the history of Eastern Europe, including the division of the East Slavic people into three separate nations: modern-day Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, and the rise of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.
The state originated with the Mongol invasion of Rus', at which point Daniel I was appointed to the newly-created Moscow in 1283 as effectively a puppet to the Mongol Empire (under the "Tatar Yoke"), the latter of which had eclipsed and eventually absorbed its parent duchy of Vladimir-Suzdal by the 1320s.

Cumans

CumanCuman peoplePolovtsy
The princes of Rus' first heard of the coming Mongol warriors from the nomadic Cumans.
After the Mongol invasion (1237), many sought asylum in the Kingdom of Hungary, as many Cumans had settled in Hungary, the Second Bulgarian Empire, and Anatolia before the invasion.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
The invasion, facilitated by the beginning of the breakup of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, had incalculable ramifications for the history of Eastern Europe, including the division of the East Slavic people into three separate nations: modern-day Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, and the rise of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.
The 13th-century Mongol invasion devastated Kievan Rus'.

Mstislav Mstislavich

Mstislav the BoldMstislavMstislav Mstislavich of Trepol
In response to this call, Mstislav the Bold and Mstislav Romanovich the Old joined forces and set out eastward to meet the foe, only to be routed on April 1, 1223, at the Battle of the Kalka River.
Mstislav Mstislavich the Daring (Мстисла́в II Мстисла́вич Удатный, Мстисла́в Мстисла́вич Уда́тний) was one of the most popular and active princes of Kievan Rus' in the decades preceding the Mongol invasion of Rus'.

Belarus

BLRRepublic of BelarusBelorussia
The invasion, facilitated by the beginning of the breakup of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, had incalculable ramifications for the history of Eastern Europe, including the division of the East Slavic people into three separate nations: modern-day Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, and the rise of the Grand Duchy of Moscow.
Many early Rus' principalities were virtually razed or severely affected by a major Mongol invasion in the 13th century, but the lands of modern Belarus avoided the brunt of the invasion and eventually joined the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

Yaroslavl

YaroslavYaroslavl, RussiaJaroslavl
Thereupon Batu Khan divided his army into smaller units, which ransacked fourteen cities of modern-day Russia: Rostov, Uglich, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Kashin, Ksnyatin, Gorodets, Galich, Pereslavl-Zalessky, Yuriev-Polsky, Dmitrov, Volokolamsk, Tver and Torzhok.
Another constant source of danger for the city and for the many Russian princes of the time came from the East and the many foreign invaders, usually from the Mongol Horde.

Rostov

Rostov the GreatRostov VelikyRostov Velikiy
Thereupon Batu Khan divided his army into smaller units, which ransacked fourteen cities of modern-day Russia: Rostov, Uglich, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Kashin, Ksnyatin, Gorodets, Galich, Pereslavl-Zalessky, Yuriev-Polsky, Dmitrov, Volokolamsk, Tver and Torzhok.
Ravaged by the Mongols in the 13th and 14th centuries (last sack by Edigu in 1408) and the Poles in 1608, Rostov became a medium-sized town.

Kashin (town)

KashinPrincipality of Kashin
Thereupon Batu Khan divided his army into smaller units, which ransacked fourteen cities of modern-day Russia: Rostov, Uglich, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Kashin, Ksnyatin, Gorodets, Galich, Pereslavl-Zalessky, Yuriev-Polsky, Dmitrov, Volokolamsk, Tver and Torzhok.
Kashin was first mentioned in a chronicle under the year of 1238, when it was sacked during the Mongol invasion.

Chernihiv

ChernigovCzernihówChernigiv
In the winter of 1239, he sacked Chernigov and Pereyaslav.
The golden age of Chernihiv, when the city population peaked at 25,000, lasted until 1239 when the city was sacked by the hordes of Batu Khan, which started a long period of relative obscurity.

Volokolamsk

Appanage of VolokolamskVolokVolokolamsky District
Thereupon Batu Khan divided his army into smaller units, which ransacked fourteen cities of modern-day Russia: Rostov, Uglich, Yaroslavl, Kostroma, Kashin, Ksnyatin, Gorodets, Galich, Pereslavl-Zalessky, Yuriev-Polsky, Dmitrov, Volokolamsk, Tver and Torzhok.
After the Mongol invasion of Rus', the town was divided into two parts: one assigned to Novgorod and another one to the Grand Dukes of Vladimir.

Battle of the Sit River

1237–1238 invasion of eastern and northern Rusat the Sit' Riveron the Sit' River
Crossing the Volga, he mustered a new army, which was encircled and totally annihilated by the Mongols in the Battle of the Sit River on March 4.
The Battle of the Sit River was fought in the northern part of the present-day Sonkovsky District of Tver Oblast of Russia, close to the selo of Bozhonka, on March 4, 1238 between the Mongol Hordes of Batu Khan and the Rus' under Grand Prince Yuri II of Vladimir-Suzdal during the Mongol invasion of Rus.

Pereiaslav

PereyaslavPereiaslav-KhmelnytskyiPereyaslavl
In the winter of 1239, he sacked Chernigov and Pereyaslav.
The city was the capital of the Principality of Pereiaslavl' from the middle of the 11th century until its demolition by Tatars in 1239, during the Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus'.

Veliky Novgorod

NovgorodNovgorod the GreatPrincipality of Novgorod
The only major cities to escape destruction were Novgorod and Pskov.
Novgorod was never conquered by the Mongols during the Mongol invasion of Rus.

Kitezh

Invisible City of Kitezh
As the story goes, at the news of the Mongol approach, the whole town of Kitezh with all its inhabitants was submerged into a lake, where, as legend has it, it may be seen to this day.
According to folk etymology, the name of the town came from the royal residence of Kideksha (near Suzdal), ransacked by the Mongols in 1237, while Max Vasmer labels the place-name as "obscure".

Battle of the Kalka River

Battle of Kalka RiverBattle of KalkaKalka River
In response to this call, Mstislav the Bold and Mstislav Romanovich the Old joined forces and set out eastward to meet the foe, only to be routed on April 1, 1223, at the Battle of the Kalka River. The campaign was heralded by the Battle of the Kalka River in May 1223, which resulted in a Mongol victory over the forces of several Rus' principalities.

Tatars

TatarTartarTatarian
It was only in the 14th and 15th centuries, with the rise of the Tatar khanates, that slave raids on the Slavic population became significant, with the purpose of trading slaves with the Ottoman Empire.
As various nomadic groups became part of Genghis Khan's army in the early 13th century, a fusion of Mongol and Turkic elements took place, and the invaders of Rus' and the Pannonian Basin became known to Europeans as Tatars or Tartars (see Tatar yoke).

Mongol Empire

MongolMongolsMongolian Empire
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.
By 1240, all Kievan Rus' had fallen to the Asian invaders except for a few northern cities.

Krutitsy

Christian bishopricKrutitsaKrutitsy Metochion
After adopting Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde, who first became a Muslim, allowed the Rus' to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.
After the Mongol invasion of Russia, in 1261, Russian Orthodox clergy established the Diocese of Sarai in the capital city of the Golden Horde, with an overt mission to serve the numerous Slavic population of Sarai (some Slavs were abducted by force, some joined the Mongol service voluntarily; Russian princes had to pay regular visits of homage to Sarai).

Tver Uprising of 1327

joined a rebellion against the Mongols
After the prince of Tver joined a rebellion against the Mongols in 1327, his rival prince Ivan I of Moscow joined the Mongols in crushing Tver and devastating its lands.
In the early 13th century, the Mongol Empire invaded the Kieven Rus' and proceeded to establish a hegemony over the Rus' states.

Russian Orthodox Church

Russian OrthodoxMoscow PatriarchateOrthodox
By doing so he eliminated his rival, allowed the Russian Orthodox Church to move its headquarters to Moscow and was granted the title of Grand Prince by the Mongols.
As Kiev was losing its political, cultural, and economical significance due to the Mongol invasion, Metropolitan Maximus moved to Vladimir in 1299; his successor, Metropolitan Peter moved the residence to Moscow in 1325.