Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet

Mongolian CyrillicMongolianCyrillicMongolian cyrillic.Cyrillic scriptCyrillic became the official scriptMongol CyrillicMongol Cyrillic.Mongolian Cyrillic scriptRussian-based Cyrillic
The Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet (Mongolian: Монгол Кирилл үсэг, Mongol Kirill üseg or Кирилл цагаан толгой, Kirill cagaan tolgoi) is the writing system used for the standard dialect of the Mongolian language in the modern state of Mongolia.wikipedia
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Inner Mongolia

Inner Mongolia Autonomous RegionNei MongolInner
Cyrillic has not been adopted as the writing system in the Inner Mongolia region of China, which continues to use the traditional Mongolian script.
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.

Khalkha Mongolian

KhalkhaKhalkha dialectModern Mongolian
The Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet (Mongolian: Монгол Кирилл үсэг, Mongol Kirill üseg or Кирилл цагаан толгой, Kirill cagaan tolgoi) is the writing system used for the standard dialect of the Mongolian language in the modern state of Mongolia.
The Khalkha dialect (Mongolian script:, Qalq-a ayalγu, Mongolian Cyrillic: Халх аялгуу, Khalkh ayalguu, ) is a dialect of Mongolian widely spoken in Mongolia and according to some classifications includes such Southern Mongolian varieties such as Shiliin gol, Ulaanchab and Sönid.

Mongolian script

MongolianMongol scriptTraditional Mongolian alphabet
Cyrillic has not been adopted as the writing system in the Inner Mongolia region of China, which continues to use the traditional Mongolian script. After the Mongolian democratic revolution in 1990, the traditional Mongolian script was briefly considered to replace Cyrillic, but the plan was canceled in the end.
During the communist era, when Cyrillic became the official script for the Mongolian language, the traditional script became known as the Old Mongol script, in contrast to the New script, referring to Cyrillic.

Mongolian Latin alphabet

in which Mongolia used the Latin alphabetLatin alphabetLatin was used as the official script
It was introduced in the 1940s in the Mongolian People's Republic under Soviet influence, after two months in 1941 where Latin was used as the official script, while Latinisation in the Soviet Union was in vogue.
In 1939, the second version of the Latin alphabet was introduced but not used widely until it was replaced by the Cyrillic script in 1941.

Mongolian language

MongolianMongolKhalkha-Mongolian
The Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet (Mongolian: Монгол Кирилл үсэг, Mongol Kirill üseg or Кирилл цагаан толгой, Kirill cagaan tolgoi) is the writing system used for the standard dialect of the Mongolian language in the modern state of Mongolia.
Between 1930 and 1932, a short-lived attempt was made to introduce the Latin script in the Mongolian state, and after a preparatory phase, the Mongolian Cyrillic script was declared mandatory by government decree.

Phonemic orthography

phonetic spellingphonemicphonetic
It has a largely phonemic orthography, meaning that there is a fair degree of consistency in the representation of individual sounds.

Mongolian Revolution of 1990

1990 Democratic Revolution in Mongolia1990 Democratic Revolutiondemocratic revolution in 1990
After the Mongolian democratic revolution in 1990, the traditional Mongolian script was briefly considered to replace Cyrillic, but the plan was canceled in the end.
The protesters injected a nationalist element into the protests by using traditional Mongolian script—which most Mongolians could not read—as a symbolic repudiation of the political system which had imposed the Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet.

Mongolia

MongolRepublic of MongoliaMongolian
The Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet (Mongolian: Монгол Кирилл үсэг, Mongol Kirill üseg or Кирилл цагаан толгой, Kirill cagaan tolgoi) is the writing system used for the standard dialect of the Mongolian language in the modern state of Mongolia.
in Mongolian Cyrillic; Mongγol Ulus [transliterated] in Mongolian script) is a landlocked country in East Asia.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
Cyrillic has not been adopted as the writing system in the Inner Mongolia region of China, which continues to use the traditional Mongolian script.

Mongolian writing systems

Mongolian alphabetMongolianMongolian alphabets
Mongolian Cyrillic is the most recent of the many writing systems that have been used for Mongolian.

Cyrillic script

CyrillicCyrillic alphabetUzbek Cyrillic
It is a Cyrillic alphabet and is thus similar to, for example, the Bulgarian alphabet.

Bulgarian alphabet

Bulgarian CyrillicBulgarianBulgarian Cyrillic alphabet
It is a Cyrillic alphabet and is thus similar to, for example, the Bulgarian alphabet.

Russian alphabet

RussianCyrillicRussian Cyrillic
It uses the same characters as the Russian alphabet except for the two additional characters Өө and Үү.

Oe (Cyrillic)

ӨCyrillic letter Oe Ө Oe
It uses the same characters as the Russian alphabet except for the two additional characters Өө and Үү.

Ue (Cyrillic)

ҮCyrillic letter UeUe
It uses the same characters as the Russian alphabet except for the two additional characters Өө and Үү.

Mongolian People's Republic

MongoliaPeople's Republic of MongoliaMongolian
It was introduced in the 1940s in the Mongolian People's Republic under Soviet influence, after two months in 1941 where Latin was used as the official script, while Latinisation in the Soviet Union was in vogue.

Soviet Empire

Soviet sphere of influenceSoviet imperialismSoviet
It was introduced in the 1940s in the Mongolian People's Republic under Soviet influence, after two months in 1941 where Latin was used as the official script, while Latinisation in the Soviet Union was in vogue.

Latinisation in the Soviet Union

LatinizedLatinisationLatin
It was introduced in the 1940s in the Mongolian People's Republic under Soviet influence, after two months in 1941 where Latin was used as the official script, while Latinisation in the Soviet Union was in vogue.

Ukrainian alphabet

UkrainianUkrainian CyrillicUkrainian orthography
Үү and Өө are sometimes also written as the Ukrainian letters Її (or Vv) and Єє respectively, when using Russian software or keyboards that do not support them.

Yi (Cyrillic)

ЇYiЇ ї
Үү and Өө are sometimes also written as the Ukrainian letters Її (or Vv) and Єє respectively, when using Russian software or keyboards that do not support them.

Ukrainian Ye

ЄЄ єYe
Үү and Өө are sometimes also written as the Ukrainian letters Її (or Vv) and Єє respectively, when using Russian software or keyboards that do not support them.

Soft sign

ЬЬ ьsoft
Palatalisation is indicated by и (i), the soft sign ь or е (ye), ё (yo), я (ya) and ю (yu) after the palatalised consonant.