Montecristo

Monte CristoMontecristo IslandIsland of MontecristoMonte Christo
Montecristo (, ; also Monte Cristo), formerly Oglasa (in Ancient Greek: Ὠγλάσσα Ōglassa), is an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea and part of the Tuscan Archipelago.wikipedia
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Tuscan Archipelago

Arcipelago ToscanoScoglietto di PortoferraioTuscan Islands
Montecristo (, ; also Monte Cristo), formerly Oglasa (in Ancient Greek: Ὠγλάσσα Ōglassa), is an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea and part of the Tuscan Archipelago.
History and literature have ensured that most people are familiar with the islands of Elba and Montecristo.

The Count of Monte Cristo

Count of Monte CristoLe Comte de Monte CristoMonte Cristo
Much of the island's fame is derived from the fact that it provides the setting for part of the novel The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas.
As the powerful and mysterious Count of Monte Cristo (Italy), he arrives from the Orient to enter the fashionable Parisian world of the 1830s and avenge himself on the men who conspired to destroy him.

Mamilian of Palermo

MamilianSan MamilianoSt Mamiliano
Around the middle of the fifth century AD, the caves of the island became home to several hermits escaping from the Vandals of Genseric, the most important of whom was St. Mamilian.
After that, he spent time on the island of Montecristo.

Arcipelago Toscano National Park

Tuscan Archipelago National ParkTuscan Archipelago
The island is a state nature reserve and forms part of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park.

Portoferraio

Porto FerrajoPicchiaiePorto Ferraie
Administratively it belongs to the municipality of Portoferraio in the province of Livorno, Italy.

Scoglio d'Africa

Montecristo is located in the Tyrrhenian Sea east of Corsica, south of Elba, west of the island of Giglio and the Monte Argentario peninsula, southeast of the island of Pianosa and east of the Scoglio d'Africa rock, also known as Formica di Montecristo.
It is located 18.5 km west of the Island of Montecristo, 23.5 km south of Pianosa Island and 43.1 km east of Corsica.

Pianosa

PlanasiaPianosa Island
Montecristo is located in the Tyrrhenian Sea east of Corsica, south of Elba, west of the island of Giglio and the Monte Argentario peninsula, southeast of the island of Pianosa and east of the Scoglio d'Africa rock, also known as Formica di Montecristo. After other attempts at colonisation in 1878, the Italian government founded a penal colony there, a branch of that in Pianosa.
The Appianos sold Pisa to Gian Galeazzo Visconti in 1399 and established the small Principality of Piombino which included Suvereto, Scarlino, Vignale, Populonia and the islands of Elba, Montecristo and Pianosa.

Elba

Elba IslandIsle of ElbaIsola d'Elba
Montecristo is located in the Tyrrhenian Sea east of Corsica, south of Elba, west of the island of Giglio and the Monte Argentario peninsula, southeast of the island of Pianosa and east of the Scoglio d'Africa rock, also known as Formica di Montecristo. During the imperial age, the Romans opened some quarries to extract granite, perhaps used in the construction of villas on the islands of Giglio, Elba, and Giannutri.

Vipera aspis hugyi

V. aspis hugyiVipera aspis montecristi
Also interesting are the Montecristo viper (Vipera aspis hugyi, a subspecies also present in southern Italy, and today considered introduced by humans) and Discoglossus sardus, an amphibian found only in a couple of islands in Tuscany and Sardinia.
Specimens from Montecristo Island, sometimes referred to as ''V.

Tyrrhenian painted frog

Discoglossus sardus
Also interesting are the Montecristo viper (Vipera aspis hugyi, a subspecies also present in southern Italy, and today considered introduced by humans) and Discoglossus sardus, an amphibian found only in a couple of islands in Tuscany and Sardinia.
It is also present on several small islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea such as Iles d'Hyères, Giglio, Montecristo, and the Monte Argentario peninsula in Tuscany.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Montecristo (, ; also Monte Cristo), formerly Oglasa (in Ancient Greek: Ὠγλάσσα Ōglassa), is an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea and part of the Tuscan Archipelago.

Tyrrhenian Sea

TyrrhenianTyrrhenian coastCorsica Channel
Montecristo (, ; also Monte Cristo), formerly Oglasa (in Ancient Greek: Ὠγλάσσα Ōglassa), is an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea and part of the Tuscan Archipelago.

Comune

comuniCommunecommunes
Administratively it belongs to the municipality of Portoferraio in the province of Livorno, Italy.

Province of Livorno

LivornoLivorno provinceLI
Administratively it belongs to the municipality of Portoferraio in the province of Livorno, Italy.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
Administratively it belongs to the municipality of Portoferraio in the province of Livorno, Italy.

Nature reserve

biosphere reservenature preservewildlife sanctuary
The island is a state nature reserve and forms part of the Tuscan Archipelago National Park.

Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas, pèreDumasAlexander Dumas
Much of the island's fame is derived from the fact that it provides the setting for part of the novel The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas.

Iron Age

Early Iron AgeIronLate Iron Age
The history of the island begins with the Iron Age.

Etruscan civilization

EtruscanEtruscansEtruscan League
The Etruscans exploited the forests of oak needed to fuel the bloomeries of the mainland where the iron ore of Elba's mines was melted.

Bloomery

bloomeriesiron furnaceiron furnaces
The Etruscans exploited the forests of oak needed to fuel the bloomeries of the mainland where the iron ore of Elba's mines was melted.

Etruria

TyrrheniaEtruscanKingdom of Etruria
The Etruscans exploited the forests of oak needed to fuel the bloomeries of the mainland where the iron ore of Elba's mines was melted.

Iron ore

ironiron mineiron-ore
The Etruscans exploited the forests of oak needed to fuel the bloomeries of the mainland where the iron ore of Elba's mines was melted.

Jupiter (mythology)

JupiterJoveJupiter Optimus Maximus
The Romans, however, knew it under the name Mons Jovis, and erected an altar to Iuppiter Optimus Maximus on the highest mountain, of which some traces remain.

Quarry

quarriesquarryingquarried
During the imperial age, the Romans opened some quarries to extract granite, perhaps used in the construction of villas on the islands of Giglio, Elba, and Giannutri.