Moons of Neptune

moon of Neptune14satellite of NeptunemoonsNeptunian system14 known satellites14 moons14th to be discovered7 small regular moons at Neptuneexcept Neptune
Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.wikipedia
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Neptune

NeptunianAtmosphere of NeptuneNeptune-mass
Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.
Its largest moon, Triton, was discovered shortly thereafter, though none of the planet's remaining known 13 moons were located telescopically until the 20th century.

Triton (moon)

TritonAndvari Triton
By far the largest of them is Triton, discovered by William Lassell on October 10, 1846, 17 days after the discovery of Neptune itself; over a century passed before the discovery of the second natural satellite, Nereid.
Triton is the largest natural satellite of the planet Neptune, and the first Neptunian moon to be discovered.

Nereid (moon)

NereidNereids
By far the largest of them is Triton, discovered by William Lassell on October 10, 1846, 17 days after the discovery of Neptune itself; over a century passed before the discovery of the second natural satellite, Nereid.
It was the second moon of Neptune to be discovered, by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.

Psamathe (moon)

Psamathemoon
The two outermost Neptunian irregular satellites, Psamathe and Neso, have the largest orbits of any natural satellites discovered in the Solar System to date.
Psamathe (Latin: Psamathē; Greek: Ψαμάθη), also known as Neptune X, is a retrograde irregular satellite of Neptune.

Hippocamp (moon)

HippocampNeptune XIV
Mark Showalter discovered Hippocamp on 1 July 2013 while examining Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of Neptune's ring arcs from 2009.
Its discovery on 1 July 2013 increased the number of Neptune's known satellites to fourteen.

Solar System

outer Solar Systeminner Solar Systemouter planets
Neptune's outermost moon Neso, which has an orbital period of about 26 Julian years, orbits further from its planet than any other moon in the Solar System. The next-largest irregular satellite in the Solar System, Saturn's moon Phoebe, has only 0.03% of Triton's mass. The capture of Triton, probably occurring some time after Neptune formed a satellite system, was a catastrophic event for Neptune's original satellites, disrupting their orbits so that they collided to form a rubble disc.
Neptune has 14 known satellites.

Voyager 2

2Voyager IIMariner 12
No further moons were found until Voyager 2 flew by Neptune in 1989.

Regular moon

regular satelliteregular satellitesregular
Inward of Triton are seven small regular satellites, all of which have prograde orbits in planes that lie close to Neptune's equatorial plane; some of these orbit among Neptune's rings.
There are at least 57 regular satellites of the eight planets: one at Earth, eight at Jupiter, 23 named regular moons at Saturn (not counting hundreds or thousands of moonlets), 18 known at Uranus, and 7 small regular moons at Neptune (Neptune's largest moon Triton appears to have been captured).

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanemo
Triton is unique among moons of planetary mass in that its orbit is retrograde to Neptune's rotation and inclined relative to Neptune's equator, which suggests that it did not form in orbit around Neptune but was instead gravitationally captured by it.

1162 Larissa

Two asteroids share the same names as moons of Neptune: 74 Galatea and 1162 Larissa.
The name was also given to Larissa (Neptune VII), one of the moons of Neptune.

Rings of Neptune

Neptune's ringsAdams ringring of Neptune
Mark Showalter discovered Hippocamp on 1 July 2013 while examining Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of Neptune's ring arcs from 2009. Inward of Triton are seven small regular satellites, all of which have prograde orbits in planes that lie close to Neptune's equatorial plane; some of these orbit among Neptune's rings.
The rings are reddish in color, and their geometrical (0.05) and Bond (0.01–0.02) albedos are similar to those of the Uranian rings' particles and the inner Neptunian moons.

Scott S. Sheppard

S. S. SheppardScott SheppardSheppard
Discovered moons of Neptune (full list):

Natural satellite

moonmoonssatellite
Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.

List of water deities

sea goddessriver godsea god
Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
Neptune has 14 known moons, which are named for minor water deities in Greek mythology.

William Lassell

LassellLassell, William
By far the largest of them is Triton, discovered by William Lassell on October 10, 1846, 17 days after the discovery of Neptune itself; over a century passed before the discovery of the second natural satellite, Nereid.

Neso (moon)

Neso
The two outermost Neptunian irregular satellites, Psamathe and Neso, have the largest orbits of any natural satellites discovered in the Solar System to date. Neptune's outermost moon Neso, which has an orbital period of about 26 Julian years, orbits further from its planet than any other moon in the Solar System.

Julian year (astronomy)

yrayears
Neptune's outermost moon Neso, which has an orbital period of about 26 Julian years, orbits further from its planet than any other moon in the Solar System.

Retrograde and prograde motion

retrogradeprograderetrograde orbit
Inward of Triton are seven small regular satellites, all of which have prograde orbits in planes that lie close to Neptune's equatorial plane; some of these orbit among Neptune's rings. Triton is unique among moons of planetary mass in that its orbit is retrograde to Neptune's rotation and inclined relative to Neptune's equator, which suggests that it did not form in orbit around Neptune but was instead gravitationally captured by it.

Orbital inclination

inclinationinclinedtilted
Triton is unique among moons of planetary mass in that its orbit is retrograde to Neptune's rotation and inclined relative to Neptune's equator, which suggests that it did not form in orbit around Neptune but was instead gravitationally captured by it.

Saturn

Atmosphere of SaturnOrbit of SaturnPhainon
The next-largest irregular satellite in the Solar System, Saturn's moon Phoebe, has only 0.03% of Triton's mass. The capture of Triton, probably occurring some time after Neptune formed a satellite system, was a catastrophic event for Neptune's original satellites, disrupting their orbits so that they collided to form a rubble disc.

Phoebe (moon)

PhoebeA moonSaturn IX (Phoebe)
The next-largest irregular satellite in the Solar System, Saturn's moon Phoebe, has only 0.03% of Triton's mass. The capture of Triton, probably occurring some time after Neptune formed a satellite system, was a catastrophic event for Neptune's original satellites, disrupting their orbits so that they collided to form a rubble disc.

Hydrostatic equilibrium

hydrostatic balanceequilibriumhydrostatic
Triton is massive enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium and to retain a thin atmosphere capable of forming clouds and hazes.

Proteus (moon)

ProteusPharoscrater in Proteus
The largest of them is Proteus.